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October 30, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-30

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 30, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

..1IAPT S G OOD .
Op-t -

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RRC-OZA! kA.' M RG !
STOP ThRPASWN~.G.! ~ UVE
~AOST GOT IT-., PdMOS V.-
MM4V! 7T1ERE.'
.e

by Bill Watterson
0a, ITS A GOOD TING 10
H AO TIS REMOVED.' JUST
LOOK AT ALL
WESE SAO5F T!

'Battle'
targets
increase

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Nuts and Bolts
50 I TOLD I-JIM I AtR PY
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WATSoN,"tMlg IS WRI.LoRI!
THIS tS WATSON.
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WF-LL, LUMUS Z. H-AVE To
Go, BUT SEASE cALL ME
LA7R, O.K .
SURE.
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by Judd Winick
YO, STUBDr
.i-iT UP FRR
O VRLS5AK&,1j4ILL'YA .

ATTORNEY
Continued from page 1
educated person and only three of the
50 possible jurors had seen the cen-

ter exhibit. Ultimately, the defense
succeeded because it proved to the
jury that the works did have artistic
value, he said.
Censorship and art will be "a real

battle over the next few years," said
Sirkin. "All of you should be com-
mitted to never letting it happen
again," he told the future lawyers in
the audience as he closed his speech.

RESTAURANT
"26 YEARS EXPERIENCE"

No, it's not the prez...KRISSYGOODMAN/Daiy
It's guitar instructor David Swain as he strums away a beautiful fall day
on the porch of the Herb David Guitar Studio, located at 5th and E.
Liberty.

I

* C$HE11F JAN
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
OF DETROIT
COBO HALL NATIONAL CONTEST
sponsored by Michigan Restaurant Association
Michigan Chefs De Cuisine Association
BLUE RIBBON BEST CHEF
AWARD WINNER
IN WASHINGTON D.C.
VOTED #1 BEST ORIENTAL FOOD
IN ANN ARBOR 1990-Michigan Daily
VOTED #1 BEST CHINESE FOOD
IN ANN ARBOR 1990-Ann Arbor News

SAPAC
Continued from page 1
Instead of developing new pro-
grams, SAPAC has had to curtail
existing ones. "We only have one
it was the intention of
the University to
increase support for
SAPAC
- Walter Harrison,
Executive Director of
University Relations

full-time counselor," said Steiner,
noting a need for more staffers.
Also, SAPAC's crisis phone line
no longer has live operators 24
hours a day, everyday of the week.
Although counselors can still be
reached in emergency situations, the
end of the 24-hour line took effect in
September primarily due to a lack of
funds, Steiner said.
Harrison said that while it is true
the center has not received increased
funding for more programs, "it .was
the intention of the University to in-
crease support for SAPAC."

in donors
by Purvi Shah
In an effort to collect more blood
for this year's U of M - OSU Blood
Battle, University organizers are in-
cluding more residence halls and giv*
ing donors the option to make ap-
pointments.
"We're really focusing on the res-
idence halls and trying to go right to
the people," said Katie Leshock, Al-
pha Phi Omega (APO) blood drive
co-chair.
In addition to targeting more
people, Neal Fry, the regional Red
Cross representative to the Univer-
sity, promises this year, "studentD
will be in and out in an hour."
The contest is the first time
many students donate blood, said
Leshock.
"The Blood Battle draws in more
first-time donors, but the drawback
is that people think they don't have
to donate the rest of the year. The
number one reason why people do
not donate blood is that they were
never asked. We try to eliminate
that," Leshock added.
Fry said ten percent of the Uni-
versity's student body donates blood
in the annual Blood Battle, compared
to three percent donated by factory
workers and 20 percent given by
small corporation employees.
In order to increase participation,
Blood Battle organizers are empha-
sizing the need for blood products,0
promoting the rivalry between the
University and Ohio State, and ex-
plaining the painless procedure of
donating blood.
"What it really is, is two
pinches," said Steve Edelstein, APO
blood drive co-chair. "It's relatively
painless, the whole thing is com-
pletely donor-safe, and we need the
blood badly."
All the needles are sterile, and*
Red Cross tests blood given to recip-
ients to ensure safety.
Since the beginning of the Blood
Battle eight years ago, both the Uni-
versity and Ohio State have collected
a total of 90,000 pints of blood.
The University Hospital, how-
ever, uses 95,000 units of blood
derivatives per year, while the 70
hospitals in the southeastern
Michigan area use more than 30 mil-
lion units each year.
"There are huge blood shortages
across the nation - especially in
southeastern Michigan - so it's
more important than ever for people
to donate...."
Due to the scarcity in southeast-
ern Michigan, blood is imported
from places as near as Flint and as
far away as Bulgaria, Fry said.
Leshock said there is always a
need for blood, "and the idea of do-
nating should be greater than the idea
of the Blood Battle."
<ASW

BLOOD
Continued from page 1
before each game," Leshock said.
The rivalry adds a festive element
to the Blood Battle. "It's a fun thing
to be doing because the Buckeyes are
so stupid," Fry said.
"People get really psyched," said
Elif Oker, an APO member and two-
time Blood Battle volunteer.
The festivity influenced Leshock
to join APO since the Blood Battle
is one of the largestprojectsdthe co-
ed service fraternity coordinates.
After she donated blood, she said she
"saw a cool group of people" and
thought, "I've got to do this."

"One of the neat things is that
you see the good right in front of
you," she added. "It's really gratify-
ing."
Edelstein joined APO for similar
reasons. "When I started giving
blood as a freshman, I knew I wanted
to run it. Only one out of 17 stu-
dents actually gives blood I
wanted to change that," he said.
Despite the fun, the thought that
runs through Oker's mind when vol-
unteering, he said, is, "Please don't
fall on me." So far, Oker has not
seen anyone faint.
Leshock added, "We're foaming
for hemoglobin." Excuse her for be-
ing just a little blood-thirsty.

LUNCHEON SPECIAL 11:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.
DINE IN OR TAKE OUT SERVICE
Specializing in Szechuan, Hunan, and Peking Cuisine
1201 S. University, Ann Arbor - 668-2445
Open 7 Days a week 11 a.m. -10 p.m.

i 1989
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
RECREATIONAL SPORTS
General Motors ... "Putting quality on the road"
See the visions and concepts of General Motors:

ELECTIONS
Continued from page 1
parliament," Makaridze said.
In a weekend interview,
Gamsakhurdia predicted that
Georgia's transition to independence
would take about two years, and that
the republic would maintain
extensive economic relations with
the Soviet Union. It also seemed
likely that Georgia would rely on the
Soviet Union in national security
matters.
About 35 parties, most grouped
by coalition, took part in Sunday's
election, the first true multiparty
vote in Soviet history.
Non-Communists have won
elections in several cities and
republics elsewhere in the Soviet
Union, but the Georgian balloting
was the first in which formal parties,
created under new Soviet laws, were
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

listed on the ballot.
Some politicians boycotted the
election, claiming it was not
democratic. One of them, the leader
of the National Democratic Party,
Gia Chanturia, was shot in the arm
Friday as he left a political meeting.
Two National Democratic Party
members, Gia Kobakhedze and Irakli
Tsereteli, spoke on Georgian
television and accused Gamsakhurdia
of organizing the shooting on orders
from Soviet authorities.
Gamsakhurdia denied
responsibility from the shooting,
and accused authorities in an
interview Sunday of trying to
sabotage the election by not telling
people where to vote.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
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PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
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EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Associate Editors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Noah Finkel
Kristine LaLonde
Diane Cook, Ian Hoffman
Josh Mitnid, Noele Vance
David Schwartz
Stephen Henderson,
1. Matthew Miller
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez

Sports Editor
Associate Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Rim
Music
Theater

Mike Gill
Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lenmont,
Ryan Schreiber, Jeff Sheran
Kristin Palen,Annette Petrusso
Caroyn Paor
Jon Bilk, Bent Edwards
P yeteShairbo
Mary Both Barber

*I

DATE:
PLACE:
TIME:

October 30 and 31, 1990
Central Campus Recreational Building
9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

r

General Motors and GMAC Financial Services are pleased to be associated with your campus' "GM
Auto Expo." See the latest GM cars and trucks in the convenience of your own campus community,
and ask about the wide variety of financing plans available to college students through GMAC
Financial Services, including the GMAC College Graduate Finance Plan.
HOW TO WIN- Ry atendingonaur ehool's GM Auto Fxn event vol can he eligible to win one of two 55(X)erants toward 'our 1uiton expensesp rovided h General Motors or

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DAILY
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News: Josephine Ballenger, Michelle Clayton, HeatherFee, Jule Foster, Jay Garda, Henry GoldblattJennifer Hirt, Christine Kloostra,
Amanda Neuman, Shalini Patel, Melissa Peerless, Dan Poux, Matt Puliam, David Rheingold, Gil Renberg, Bethany Robertson, Jon
Rosenthal, Sarah Schweitzer, Annabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Donna Woodwell;
Opinion: Tom Abowd, Russell Baltimore, Mark Buchan, Mike Fischer, Lde Hellbrurnn, Andrew Levy, Jennifer Mattson, Chis
Nordstrom, Dawn Paulinsid, Glynn Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Ken Artz, Jason Bank, Andy Brown, Mike Bess, Walt Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Steve Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKorte, Matt
Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Scott Eskine, Phil Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Jeff Lieberman, Rich Levy, Mbert Un, Rod
Loewenthal, Adam Miller, John Niyo, Sarah Osblxn, Mat Rennie, David Schechter, Ken Sigura, Eric Sklar, Andy Stabile, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Mark Binelti, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth Colquilt, Jenie Dahtnanm, Michael Paul Fischner, Forrest Green ill, Mice Kolodykse
Kun iavsky, Elizabeth Lenhard, David Lubiner, Mike Molter, Ronald Scott, Lauren Turetsky, Sue Usedmann, Kim Yaged, Nabeel
Zubed,
Photo: Brian Canteni,Anthony M. Croi, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Krissy Goodman, Michele Guy, Rob Kroenert,Jodi Millman,
Kenneth Smo.ler.

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