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October 29, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-29

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 29, 1990

Truman Foundation

modifie
by Meera Gummaraju

tion a
two ye

scholarship
nd up to $12,000 per year for tween December 1992 and August
ears of graduate study. 1993.

The application deadline for the
1991 Truman Scholarship has been
extended to Nov. 5, and juniors may
now apply for one of the 82 scholar-
ships to be awarded this year.
The Harry S. Truman Scholar-
ship Foundation - instituted by
Congress in 1975 as the official fed-
eral memorial to honor the 33rd
president - recognizes Truman's
"contributions to the nation, com-
mitments to public service, leader-
ship, and interest in education."
In addition to extending the app-
lication deadline, the foundation has
raised the maximum award from
$28,000 to $30,000.
Truman scholarships pay for stu-
dents' tuition, room and board during
their last two years of undergraduate
study and first two years of graduate
work.
Sophomore Scholars receive
$3,000 per year for the junior and
senior years of undergraduate educa-

Applicants for the Truman schol-
arship must be sophomores at a two-.
year accredited college or juniors at a
four-year accredited institution.
In addition to
extending the
application deadline,
the foundation has
raised the maximum
award from $28,000
to $30,000.

A junior is a student who plans
one more year of full-time under-
graduate study and who expects to
receive an undergraduate degree be-
tween December 1991 and August
1992.
Applicants must also rank in the
upper third of their class, be a United
States citizen or national, and be
committed to a career in public ser-
vice.
Scholars in graduate programs
planning to receive degrees in one to
two years are eligible to receive up
to $13,500 per year.
Scholars in graduate programs for
three or more years of academic
study are eligible to receive up to
$9,000 per year for a maximum of
three years.
Fourteen of the nearly 500 Tru-
man Scholarship awards given since
1975 have gone to University stu-
dents.

A sophomore is a student who
plans two years of full-time under-
graduate study after the 1990-91 aca-
demic year and who expects to re-
ceive an undergraduate dearee he-

Rapper responds AP Photo
Luther Campbell of the rap group 2 Live Crew defends his music during an appearance on "Donahue" last
week. At his right is Charles Freeman, a store owner arrested for selling the group's album.
'U' student to compete in

Calvin and Hobbes

I'M A GENIVS.
I CANT BELIEVE .1
NOW SMWT
I AM.
Jt
9
U
imrne ghat bal{
or I'll punch your
face i n .

BRAN~S TIM NOICD.
I KNOW WHAMT
TOOVWINW.
Smt ~move,
siss'y boy'.

S
'

by Bill Watterson
W o o
va-.

Jeopardy!
by Chuck Penoza in a

i n

1

4)\

(p ?
if

SCIENTIFIC PEEN-N %
JERKS.

University students who are fans
of the game show Jeopardy! may be
surprised to see a familiar face during
next week's "Tournament of Cham-
pions."
Graduate student Erik Larsen, a
student in the School of Information
and Library Studies, qualified to
compete in the week-long, $100,000
tournament by winning five games
earlier in the season. The tournament
begins airing Monday, Nov. 5.
The tournament was taped one
week ago, Oct. 22 and 23, but Jeop-
ardy! policy forbids Larsen from re-
vealing if or how much he won. His
first appearance on television will be
Nov. 8.

map
whim, m
He re
about th
informat
try out.
and fou
the audi
writtent
ardy!, an
A whi
received;
"I w
tosh, wh
the cont
ardy!, a
to be on
probably
recalled.
Larse
1990. H

championship
stcard, as he said, "on a games, and in the process won
pore or less." $54,400, which paid for his graduate
eceived a letter in the mail studies. "I like to tell people I'm on
ree weeks later, giving him a Merv Griffin Scholarship," he said.,
tion on where and when to The wins brought him a good
He made the arrangements deal of publicity in Lubbock. "The
nd himself sailing through local news did a segment on me, and
ition, which consisted of a I would always get interrupted at
test, a mock game of Jeop- work," Larsen said, "People wou10
nd an interview. ask me 'Hey, weren't you on Jeop-
ardy!?' all the time."
file after the audition, Larsen Larsen said he found the touma-
a phone call. ment more difficult than the regular
competition. "Both the questions and
as working on my Macin- the level of competition were
hen the phone rang. It was higher... the Final Jeopardy! ques-
estant coordinator for Jeop- tions, in particular, were much
nd she asked me if I wanted harder," he said.
the show. I told her I could Although Larsen refused to revel
y fit it into my schedule," he whether he won the $100,000 tou
nament prize, he said of his previous
experience, "Without it, I wouldn't
n's first show aired Feb. 21, be here talking to you... it sure beats
le won five consecutive working for a living."

0
a
°w
rn

I

Nl l ro l

Larsen's path to the tournament
began more than a year ago, while
he was living in Lubbock, Texas.
After hearing the voice-over asking
for potential contestants, Larsen sent

Nuts and Bolts
CAN Z BORROW YOUR--
WMS $FR~OM L.A$T LETUE
'1 MIWED IT.
SURE.
s HOPEsYo CAM READ IT.
ITS MAOSTW CINIlQ(EN SCRATI.

by Judd Winick

CHICK(EN SRACHC
NO CHICKENS DO'VT DOT
7kbR='" ITH LITTLE
CIPLLE .
A.-
t /
A '
t

/-,---- >
1 - // t
'z_ _
_. N.-

YO'RE c ...,
CAN WIE PEASETY
PLEASE'.?PLEA5ti

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
James Sasser (D-Tenn) said the mea-
sure would begin a "fundamental ad-
justment to many years of indul-
gence and excess."
"It will be worse for America,
worse for our children if we do not
reduce this lingering, pervasive
deficit now," said budget panel's
ranking Republican, Sen. Pete

Domenici of New Mexico.
With two of the White House of-
ficials who helped negotiate the plan
watching from the visitors gallery
- Chief of Staff John Sununu and
Budget Director Richard Darman -
opponents objected that farmers
would be hit too hard and that the
measure imposed a new burden tax-
payers do not need.
"You're going to see the work-
ing, struggling people of this coun-

try will be hit by increased taxes and
fees," said Sen. Trent Lott (R-
Miss.)
But after 10 months of inten4
and partisan warfare, exhausted law
makers said it was time to close the
deal.
The public will feel the first ef-
fects of the legislation Dec. 1 when
the Federal gasoline tax will rise by
5 cents a gallon to 14 cents.

TAXES

I

Continued from page 1
for (the students)," he said.
University officials said it was
too early to tell what kind of action
the University will take to cope with
delayed funding.

"I'm afraid it's too soon to an-
swer that question," said Gilbert
Whitaker, University provost and
vice president for academic affairs.
Whitaker said the problem will be
discussed soon.
Another proposal left out of the
budget package would have taxed tu-

CIVIL
Continued from page 1
gives (officers) reasonable, privileged
use of force."
Weber and Rinne said the
protestors then entered a conference
room inside CP&P, where Public
Safety officers Patrick and Pifer
guarded a back hall to the CIA repre-
sentatives' interviewing room.
Weber said the protestors entered
the hall and Patrick kicked Marcuse
in the groin.
Rinne said Marcuse kneed Pifer
between the legs from behind and
threw him on the floor, and "rushed"
Patrick. Rinne said the protest was
"peaceful," but Marcuse "was ag-
gressive."
"Patrick protected himself by
kicking Marcuse," she said.

Marcuse asked Detective Barbour
to arrest Patrick, Weber said, but
Barbour arrested the student for as-
sault and battery.
City Assistant Prosecuting At-
torney Ron Plunkett later charged
Marcuse with a second case of as-
sault against Pifer in a criminal case
which preceded the present civil
suits.

ition assistance money from em-
ployers under the Employer Provide
Education Assistance program.
"We're very pleased," Butts said.
"With all the complexity of the pro-
cess it's good to see with these
'small' issues Congress was able to
look out for the interest of students."
Plunkett ultimately dropped the
case on the day of its trial, April 14,
1988, Weber reported.
"The criminal case was droppe5
by the city because Marcuse was tr
ing to turn it into a political circus,"
Rinne said.
University counter-plaintiff attor-
ney Peter Davis could not be reached
for comment.

Ube Mirbigan 1tiIfj
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terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
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