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October 17, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-17

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, October 17,1990

Strange accent leads
to language discovery

I

Overseas Office

assists travellers

NEW YORK (AP) - A Balti-
more man suddenly began speaking
with a Scandinavian accent after suf-
fering a stroke, displaying a rare dis-
order that may shed light on how the
brain produces language, a study
says.
The man, who had no experience
with foreign languages, sounded
both Nordic and unfamiliar with En-
glish, said Dr. Dean Tippett.
"He was pretty clear; everyone
who heard him said he sounded
Scandinavian or Nordic," said Tip-
pett, a neurophysiology fellow at the
University of Maryland School of
Medicine in Baltimore.
The man enjoyed his new accent
at first, saying he hoped it would at-
tract women, Tippett said.
But by the time his accent had
largely faded, six weeks after the
stroke, he said he was happy to be
speaking like an American again.
His speech was normal by about
three months after the stroke.
The man had what's known as
foreign accent syndrome, a rare con-
dition in which a brain malfunction
produces speech alterations that
sound like a foreign accent. Other
reported cases in Americans have in-

volved apparent German, Spanish,
Welsh, Scottish, Irish and Italian
accents.
The syndrome is triggered by
bleeding in the brain, head injuries
or strokes. A stroke is a blockage of
blood supply to an area of the brain.
Scientists say studying the syn-
drome may reveal secrets about how
particular parts of the brain con-
tribute to spoken language.
Immediately after the stroke, the
man's speech was slurred for a day or
two. His accent appeared as he re-
covered from that, Tippett said.
The man typically added extra
vowel sounds as he spoke, saying
such things as, "How are you doing
today-ah?" Tippett said. His voice
also rose in pitch at the end of sen-
tences, as if asking a question.
Some vowel sounds were also
substituted making "hill" come out
as "heel" and "quiet" with the vowel
sound drawn out. "That" was pro-
nounced "dat"
Arnold Aronson, a Mayo Clinic
speech pathologist who has evalu-
ated about 20 people with the syn-
drome, said he knew of only about a
dozen additional cases in the scien-
tific literature.

by Nicole James
Approximately 12,000 students a
year visit the Overseas Opportunities
Office of the International Center to
look through the catalogs of foreign
universities, check out possible jobs
and internships, and plan summer
trips to Europe.
"Students who come here regard-
ing anything overseas... will be re-
ferred to the place for the right in-
formation," said International Oppor-
tunities Coordinator William Nolt-
ing. Students can "find out what the
main options are," he added.
The office gives counseling, ad-
vice, and information. In addition,
The Council on International Educa-
tionaltExchange - a non-profit,
private organization of which the
University is a member - adminis-
ters work abroad and volunteer work
camp trips.
The office tries "to advise people
to travel independently and as
POLL
Continued from page 1
poll were released Oct. 1.
Only a quarter of those asked re-
sponded, said Judicial Poll Commit-
tee Chair Carol Hollenshead.
Respondents rated the two candi-
dates' technical qualifications, work
capacity, interpersonal skills, and
character traits.
"I feel that I have a substantial
amount of experience on the bench,"
Thomassen said."I feel I'm a fair,
open-minded person, and I do a good
job."
Thomassen said that one of his
goals is to develop a relationship be-
tween the court, the Ann Arbor po-
lice, and the University as it implc-
ments its private security force.
Thomassen has worked in the

cheaply as possible," said Jeannin
Lorenger, the international opportu-
nities advisor.
International student ID card.,
youth hostel cards, Eurail passes,
and train passes for other countries
can be purchased at the office.
The office helped third-year stu-
dents Lisa Truax and Myriam
Zreczny plan a trip to Europe las4
summer.
The office "gave us information
on trains, and accommodations,
Truax said. The people were "really
friendly and helpful. It's not like we
just walked in and they forgot about
us; they kept looking for more in-
formation for us," she added.
Student comments are available
on trips, jobs, and study experiences.
The advisor and coordinator of the
office have both studied and lived
overseas, so they have first-hand
knowledge of what it is like.
15th District Court since 1969.
Berggren said in his' candidacy
statement that he hopes to briig
"much needed enthusiasm to the
bench, along with a spirit of caring,
humor and a deep moral commit-
ment." His 28 years of law-related
experience include defending and
prosecuting in the State of
Michigan, civil litigation, housing
law, and legal ethics in law school
courses dealing with legal problems
of the poor.
Berggren could not be reached fo*
comment.
The 15th District Court, located
on the sixth floor of City Hall, han-
dles local traffic violations, criminal,
and civil matters. Judicial elections
will be held as part of the general
election on Nov. 6.

Out with the old
University grounds worker Karen Lamb digs out dead flowers and
replaces them with tulip bulbs.

I

The Michigan Daily - this is what college was meant to be!!!l

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SAY IT IN THE...
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS m
, r

~icI~n4~q Ursuit

SOCIAL
Continued from page 1
American students. Sophomore
Jackie Bauer wants to go to Japan,
so it's helpful for her to meet stu-
dents who are actually from the
country.

MW
1-1## '14V ;o I
f V ;o;o
1-10 , . Z A /r// 0.1
;o 50 ;o

Homecoming 1990
October 17-20

Win Dinner
with Coach Moeller
at the Gandiy Dancer Restaurant
Answer this Trivia Question:
Former Wolverine Great, Chalmers "Bump" Elliot.
now athletic director of the University of Iowa,
had the same two notable events occur both in 1947
and again in 1964. What were the two events
and what part did he play in them?
Entries can be placed in containers
located at: the NCRB, the CCRB, the
North Campus Commons. the IM Building,
the Res Hall Computer Centers the Union
and the dorms.
Winners will be announced at the Pep Rally,
The Grand Prize is dinner with Gary Moeller,
his wife and a guest of your choice. Autographed
footballs will also be given away. In case of a tie,
there will be a drawing for these prizes.

Wednesday, October 17 Diag Events

Thursday, October 18
10:00 p.m.

Friday, October 19
1:30 p.m.
3-5:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
Saturday, October 20
9:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.

Diag Events
Soundstage
"The Difference"
The U-Club in the Union
Panel Discussion,
"Preserving Editorial Freedom
for the Future"
The Michigan Daily Centennial
Rackham Auditorium
Evans Scholars Car Bash
Diag
Pep Rally
Grad Libary Steps and Diag
Go Blue Brunch
Track and Tennis Building
"Journalists and their Sources"
Angel Nall, Auditorium A
Mudhowl
SAE vs. Phi Delta Theta
Corner of S. University
and Washtenaw

Calvin and Hobbes

EVE MRZ TAKES ME
FOR. GRATED!? NOBO1Y
PP Is MAtlPATVEkTION
TO M ( NEED'S!
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is IT TOt'MUCHA To ASK
TOKEN GST\JRFOF
IV

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CdJI Q L
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DOU ARS ?
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by Bill Watterson
SE?! r SSTIMATER
TO AMOP E ! 809OtN

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Game

Nuts and Bolts
WELL'M CLAD You EiD
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SOME VERY 1 ISNN AM75
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WILL HAVE TO W'AT.
c-
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by Judd 'Winick
Y5MAW VE ND
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NAKED, WELL HOW CANYu
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Sponsored by UAC, Krogers, Meijers and University of Michigan vs.
The Gandy Dancer Restaurant University of Iowa

________ ... + vi" nq

4e('/ 4,r Michigan's
BlRrkensIoc a9
"Service that brings you to your feet,
Sandals, clogs, & shoes
for all-weather comfort
Repair Service % 663-1644
209 N,4th Ave. B Ker own Mon-Sat 10-6

*1

~be lMkbigau &zilu
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EDITORAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
mlnaging Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
AsseodateEditors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Noah Rnkel
Krisine LaLonde
Diane Cook, Ian Hoffman
Josh Mlinik, Noele Vance
David Schwartz
Stephen Henderson,
L Matthew Miler
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez

Sports Editor
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Books
Rim
Music
Theatar

Mike Gi
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Pete Shapiro
Mary Beth Barber

News: Josephine Ballenger, Michelle Clayton, Jinho Chung, Heather Fee, Julie Foster, Henry GddblatJenrufer Hr, Chdslne
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Robertson, Sarah Schweitzer, Annabel vered, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Dona Woodweli.
Opinion: Ton Abowd, David Byce, Mark Buchan, Mike Fischer, Lesie Helbrunn, David LevinAndrew Levy, Jennier Matson, Chris
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Sports: Ken Artz, Andy Brown, hike Bess, Walt Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Steve Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKorte, Matt Dodge, Josh
Dubew, Jeni Durst, Scot Erskine, Phil Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Albert Lin, Rod Lowenthal, Adam Mier, John Niyo, Sarah
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Ludiner, Mike Moitor, Ronald Scott, Sue Uselmann, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zubert,
Photo: Anthony M. Crdl, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Krnssy Goodman, Kenneth Smoler,
Weekend: Phil Cohen, hguel Cruz, Donna Iadipado, Jesse Waker, Fred Zinn.

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