100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 16, 1990 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 16, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes
ThMT CLOUDO f ICWJPMI. T1AROk)GNAN~
STARS ISs OUR INO PP&N& E. ARNES.
GAI.A { , HE %IN CoS4\Q TERMS WE AR
MLK ( W#M. OUR SuATOWC AI P IQZLESIN
SOAR "S, WM 7A.G A\N OF SAND ON A
IS ON THE INFINITE BEACH.
EDGE OF IT./

byB"ilWteron ATESEC enables students
to work in foreign lands

by Laura Lancaster

V1"-'

Nuts and Bolts

by Judd Winick

LEVON! T-CAN'T GEI.
?NE BACK D OOR O0MN

co k1tjI
11 /11!
#D \
. . y -. , - . _.t . r _
HEYI

3

I

-v

U

0

WR T7'S Gcrrr.N INTO
TH-E BACK OOR OPENED.
GOTrTA WALKyz ALL 7HEWAY
OUT FR~ONT I L)0S-
0
V
*
n4
Y'N WJUr SWEL
;
C."l
r U...

ORNi
LOH MYLRD.LO&G
AP THo R GRO-NN5
QU .1) -wlm
VIA LOG.UE.

This past year, 17 students from
the International Association of Stu-
dents in Economics and Business
Management (AIESEC) earned mo-
ney working for foreign corpora-
tions.
AIESEC is a 40-year-old, non-
profit, non-political student organ-
ization. The association strives to be
an international organization with a
focus on its international exchange
program.
Insula Corp., a Sweden-based
computer company, employed LSA
senior Chris Lin in a market research
and product manager position in Fin-
land over the summer. The position
proved to be "one of the best jobs
I've ever had in terms of responsibil-
ity," said Lin.
Lin said he learned to enjoy
Finnish culture.
"Exercise is natural instead of a
chore for them, sauna is a popular
pastime for them. I had some of the
best times in sauna," he said.
Lin even learned how to play
peseboll - Finnish baseball. "It is
a game similar to baseball except the
pitcher stands by the batter and the
ball is thrown straight up. The run-
ners run in a zigzag pattern instead
of a diamond."

Both the University of Michigan
and Michigan State participate in
this association while Penn State
and Yale represent the Ivy League
schools. On an international level,
70 universities spread over each con-
tinent participate in this program.
AIESEC students are responsible
for finding companies in their own
country to hire foreign students. A
few companies that participate in
AIESEC are Apple Computers Inc.,
Chrysler Corp., NBC and Xerox.
Carssen Spenser, an LSA senior,
also enjoyed the European culture.
Spenser had lived in Europe when he
was younger, so working in Austria
for Municipal Electric company for
he summer rekindled his memory of
Europe..
Rebecca London, a graduate
with a B.A. in Economics, went to
northern Yugoslavia to change rough
translations of contracts to make
them sound professional.
"At first it was scary because I
couldn't communicate too well, but
by the end I felt at home," she said.
Within her six-week internship
in Ljubljana, the capitol of northern
Yugoslavia, London learned the
"basic words."
"By the end I could order a beer

by myself," she said. "It's different
very different. The hours they worl
are from eight to four even for th(
managers. If my project manager
were in America he would be work.
ing from eight to ten, but in Yu.
goslavia he worked seven to three
only seven to three," said London.
Another indication of the Yu-
goslavs maintaining strong famil)
bonds is their attitude toward mar*
riage.
"Everyone lives with their par-
ents until they get married. Like thi;
one guy who was 33 years old I
worked with lives with his mother
and brother," said London. "He
makes enough money to live on hi
own so I asked him why he doesn't;
he said we just don't do that here."
The Yugoslavs uphold othet
commitments too. "All the menu
have military duty, so a lot of the
AIESEC students had less schooling
than I do. Most of them do it for a
year before they can go back to
school."
This summer, the students earned
from $1,200 to $1,400 a month. Lin
used his earnings to rent a condo-
minium from another AIESEC stu-.
dent. Students must pay for their in*
dividual accommodation and airfare.

LLVON WAIT! Ml u
WHRE R AE'1'OO
GOING? BAT.
BAT?

4

OUT OF W vF R Wr tAT
5WA-nCKA ONOUR
DOOR.
t
4
_ , WAIT.

Bush warns Iraqi atrocities
may lead to war crimes trials

ized by its "aworid" approaeh to poliey....
b/both pubie management and poiy$$ aayi
and aims to develop quantitative and quail.
tS Columbia's Prvgr~am offer:
U Essentia1 tools in<Pubkic Matage-
b..ment and Policy Analysis
P ssib/ ' Ablt otio h Program toyor
.include::::.nir:::,:
ing, i#ternationat relatims,
COLUMBIA tA
UNviIVE RrIY economicdeveomn education
.more...................
Graduate U Excellent 100% job placement
Program inPbi record
U Unlimited acesst ouba
Policy and facilities and professionaI schools
Administration S Stimunlating New York location...
..~...-... - - - - - - ----------------.----------------

Associated Press
President Bush said yesterday that
Iraqi atrocities in Kuwait could lead
to trials similar to those held after
World War II, and his defense secre-
tary said U.S. troops will stay in
Saudi Arabia as long as needed.
Iraq, meanwhile, insisted it would
rather fight than withdraw from
Kuwait.
"Hitler revisited," Bush said in
Dallas of Iraqi actions in the tiny
emirate that Saddam Hussein's
troops seized Aug. 2.
"But remember, when Hitler's
war ended there were the Nuremberg
trials. Every day now, new word fil-
ters out about the ghastly atrocities

perpetrated by Saddam's forces,"
Bush said.
Yesterday, U.S. Defense Secre-
tary Richard Cheney said Americans
would stay "as long as the Saudis
want us ... as long as it takes to get
the job done. No one should
underestimate our staying power."
"Time is much more likely to be
on our side than it is on his side,"
Cheney said, referring to Saddam and
the U.S.-led multinational force.
Asked if there was the political
will in the United States to maintain
troops in Saudi Arabia for years,
Cheney said, "There certainly is."
The defense secretary, who spoke
in London as part of a 10-day tour

dR d
MPA Program, Columbia University
School of International & Public Affairs
420 West 118th Street, Rm 1417
New York, NY 10027, (212) 854-2167
Nancy Degnan, Assistant Dean

Y eS, please send me an application and
information on Columbia's MPA Program.

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE

L

Cf Lna Qt
*R S RESTAURANT
"26 YEARS EXPERIENCE"

71

CONGRESS
Continued from page 1
ceive Medicaid funding," Dong said.
"We also think young women have a
right to reproductive freedom."
Although parental notification is.
not as restrictive as the parental con-
sent laws effective in about half of
the United States for non-Medicaid
funded abortions, McBride said the
notification amendment is still
detrimental.
"The minor is forced to tell the
parent in which case the parent can
prevent the child," she said. She
added that in cases of incest, parental
notification becomes even more dif-
ficult.
If the amendment does pass
through the conference committee,
APARTHEID
Continued from page 1
to the change.
In the town of Middelburg, east
of Johannesburg, white residents
voted to close all public facilities
rather than open them to all races.
Other towns planned to charge
exorbitant fees for "non-residents."
Most of the people living inside
town limits are white, while Blacks
are forced to live outside the town
boundaries under remaining apartheid
laws that segregate neighborhoods.
For example, the town of Bethal
planned to charge an annual fee of
$200 to non-residents wishing to use
the public library.
Anti-apartheid leaders urged
Blacks to begin using facilities and
threatened strikes and boycotts
against towns trying to maintain
segregation.
"Entry to public facilities must
be unconditional and free. What
these councils are planning is an il-
legal act of banditry," said African
National Congress official Joe
Nkuna.
Hernus Kriel, federal minister of
planning and provincial affairs,
warned that towns trying to circum-
vent the change may face legal
action.
PROTEST

and is passed by the president, with
or without the Armstrong amend-
ment, it would be a major step for
the pro-choice movement.
"We're trying to get that foot
hold back. That's the strategy - to
build back towards Medicaid funding
for all low income women,"
McBride said.
Pat Rose, former chair of the
Right to Life Organization of
Washtenaw County said her organi-
zation is opposed to the Medicaid
amendment.
"We don't think the government
should be in the business of killing
babies," Rose said.
Since the amendment was passed
in 1977, Congress has prohibited the

that also will take him to Moscow,
said economic sanctions were oni
just beginning to hurt Iraq. IJe
stressed that America hopes to avoid
war.
Iraq denied it was softening its
stance on the gulf crisis.
"Kuwait is the 19th province bf
Iraq and this fact will not be changed
whatsoever, even if we fight a lon
war for that," Information Minister
Lafif Nassayif Jassim was quoted as
saying.
He told reporters in Baghdad Sun-
day night that he believes a U.S.-led
attack is imminent, but that Iraq
would not fire the first shot, the
official Iraqi News Agency reported.
use of federal funds for abortions, al-
though some state governments have
continued to pay.
A proposal to restore Medicaid
funding was passed by both the.
House and Senate last year, but was
vetoed by President Bush. McBride
said that if the Medicaid Amendment
passes the conference committee,
Bush would be less likely to veto
the entire bill due to current budget
debates.
"There's a lot of pressure on him
to approve the budget," McBride
said. The bill to which the Medicaid
amendment is attached will decid4
budget spending for Medicaid aid
Medicare, education and other social
spending.

("oHE1F J AN
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
OF DETROIT
COBO HALL NATIONAL CONTEST
sponsored by Michigan Restaurant Association
Michigan Chefs De Cuisine Association
BLUE RIBBON BEST CHEF
AWARD WINNER
IN WASHINGTON D.C.
VOTED #1 BEST ORIENTAL FOOD
IN ANN ARBOR 1990-Michigan Daily.
VOTED #1 BEST CHINESE FOOD
IN ANN ARBOR 1990-Ann Arbor News

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 U.S. mail and $28 on campus, for fall only $22.00 U.S. mail.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sportsj47-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

EDITORALSTAFF:
Editor in Chief
Nuiging Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Assocate Editors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Noah Fkeo
Krisine LaLonde
Diane Cook. Ian Hoffman
Josh M iik, Noeie Vance
David Schwartz
Stopiien Henderson,
L Matdiew Miler
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juiarez

Sport Editor
AssoclatsSports Editors
Arts Editors
Boot
Rim
Music
Thentsr

Mike Gil
Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman. Eri Lemnt
Ryan Schreiber, Jeff Sheow
Kristin Paln, Annette Pebusso
Cardyn Pala
Jen Bilk, Brent Edwards
Pete Shq*o
May Beth Barber

News: Josephine Baenger, Michelle Clayton, Jinho Ching, Heather Fee, Jule Foster, Henry GollalJennifer Hi, Chdusin
Kioostra, Amanda Neuman, Shalini Patel, Meissa Peerless, Dan Poux, Matt Pulliam, David Rheingdd, Gil Renberg, Bethany
Robertseon, Sarah Schweitzer, Amabel Vered,StefanieVines, Ken Walker, Donna Woodwe.
Opinion: Tom Abowd, David Bryce, Mark Buchan, Mike Fischer, Leslie Helbrum, David Levin,Andrew Levy, Jennifer Mattson. Chi
Nordstrom, Dawn Pauiinski, Tony Siber, Glynn Washinglon, Kevin Woodson..
Sports: Ken Artz, Andy Brown, Mike Bess, Walt Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Steve Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKorte, Mat Dodge, Josh
Dubow,Jeni Durst, Scott Erskine, Phil Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Albert Lin, Rod Lowenihal, Adam MIer., John Niyo, Sarah
Osbun, Matt Rennie, David Schechler, Ken Sigura,Andy Stabile, Dan Zoch.
Aft Mark Onell, Greg Balse, Jenie Dahimnam, Michael Padl Fischer, Forrest Green Il, Mke Kuniavsky, Elizabeth Lenhard, David
Ludier, Mke Moilor, Ronald Scott, Sue Uselmann, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zuberi,
Photo: Anthony M. Crll, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Knssy Goodman, Kenneth Smoler,
Weekend: Phil Cohen, Miguel Cruz, Donna Iadinaoo esseWaker. Fred Zinn.

m- , m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan