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October 11, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-11

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 11, 1990

Students take a stand against
off-campus housing injustices
by College Press Service

Facing high off-campus rents and
hostile local government that have
plagued students on many campuses
across the country, a group of Uni-
versity of Maryland students is tak-
ing a fight for lower rents to the
court room.
The group of unnamed students
and landlords, led by student gov-
ernment President Daniel Cones, has
filed suit to overturn a 1989 law that
restricts the number of unrelated
people who can live in any one
dwelling.
Similar efforts to restrict students
from off-campus houses and apart-

ments also have sparked student re-
sistance at the University of Idaho,
Northwest Missouri State, Mar-
quette, and Duke universities.
At Maryland, the suit claims
Prince George's County's
"minidorm" law violates students'
constitutional rights.
"It is clear that the whole intent
of the law is to make it difficult to
rent houses to students," said Jay
Holland, the lawyer representing stu-
dents and landlords in their case
against the county.
The mini-dormitory law, passed
last November, mandates that any

house where three or more unrelated
people live must have at least 70
feet of bedroom space for each per-
son and at least one parking space.
By limiting the number of stu-
dents in a house, each person has to
pay a bigger share of rent, putting a
house rental out of reach for most
students. That leaves students to
choose between less-private apart-
ments and dorms.
Similar campus-community con-
frontations are unfolding at other
schools this fall.

Y
S

ACCIDENTS
Continued from page 1
Monday of 19 Palestinians in a
clash with police in Jerusalem, and
by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's
threat to retaliate against Israel.
Saddam announced Tuesday that
Iraq had added another missile to its
arsenal and said it could be launched
"against the target of evil when the
day of reckoning comes."
He made it clear he was referring

to Israel and the U.S.-led forces sent
to Saudi Arabia after Iraq invaded
Kuwait on Aug. 2. About 170,000
U.S. forces are deployed in Saudi
Arabia and on warships in the gulf
region.
In Washington, family members
of U.S. service personnel, two
members of Congress and religious
leaders gave a news conference to
state their concern about the
military deployment in Saudi
Arabia.

They urged Bush to pledge no
offensive action and to make the
U.S. forces part of a "truly
multinational and purely defensive
peacekeeping force" under U.N.
leadership.
Although the United States has
so far taken no military action in
the gulf, at least 24 servicemen
have died in training of other
accidents, the Pentagon said
Wednesday.

FLIERS
Continued from page 1
"they shouldn't necessarily be pun-
ished, they should be educated."
MSA Rackham representative
Corey Dolgon said by not attacking
the incident, the administration
"legitimized (it) under the guise of
free speech."
"What the dean is saying is, 'it's
my job to protect this,' but racist
speech is not free speech," Dolgon
asserted.
Bollinger said the administration
had not issued a statement condemn-
ing the flyers. "I don't think it's ap-
propriate for the institution to inves-
tigate and sanction even very repel-
lant political comment," he said.

Others believed an investigation
would be extremely difficult.
Dorsey said that although more
should have been done, it is not
likely an investigation would locate
those responsible.
Second-year law student Mike
Troy, a former MSA representative,
said, "it's nearly impossible to track
someone down who did something
like this."
Bollinger agreed that such an in-
vestigation would prove unsuccess-
ful.
At least several dozen fliers were
placed primarily in first-year law
students' folders, and scattered
amongst those belonging to second-
and third-year students, said Cori
Yates, a second-year law student who

discovered the fliers the night they
appeared. The folders, located in
Hutchins Hall, are open to the pub-
lic.
Yates said she and her friends also
removed at least seven fliers from
the walls on the second and third
floors.
The incident occurred during
Minority Alumni Weekend at the
Law School.
.wil

Go away already...AUAM- I
Students dodged puddles on the diag, and ran to class through the third (or is it fourth?) day of consecutive
rain, in this picture shot from the third floor of the UgLi.
U.S. student activism on Gulf
Crisis draws meager turnout

S-

by College Press Service
- It was going to be a show of stu-
dent opposition to the United States'
military intervention in the Middle
East.
But only 20 University of
Illinois at Champaign-Urbana stu-
dents showed up to protest at the
Sept. 5 rally.
T[he lukewarm turnout, was in
fact, typical of student anti-war
demonstrations that have been held
nationwide since President Bush an-

nounced Operation Desert Shield, in
which he sent 40,000 U.S. troops to
defend Saudi Arabia against a possi-
ble Iraqi invasion.
Rallies generally have been
sparsely attended and erratically held.
Student Desert Shield opponents
say the much-touted campus anti-war
movement, born in the days of
Vietnam, will come to life soon.
The issue "is whether people will
accept a military confrontation,"
maintained grad student Robert

Naiman, who organized the Illinois
demonstration. He thinks it will take
a while for it to take hold.
"There wasn't anything specifi-
cally set up for this issue," he noted.
"It's simply the shock of the new. It
takes a little bit of time for people.
to react to the situation.
Others attribute the anti-war
movement's slumber to students;
unwillingness to concede there really
may be a war.

_
'

C

R E A DIN G &
L E A R N I N G
"S K ILL S
C E N TE R

EFFICIENT STUDY SKILLS = MORE FREE TIME!
The U of M's READING AND LEARNING SKILLS CENTER
is offering a Reading and Study Skills Workshop to help
college students:
- learn efficient reading and study strategies
- organize and plan study time
- read faster with greater comprehension
" have more time for other interests
Workshops will be held Thursdays, Oct. 18 - Nov. 8,
4-5:30pm at the RLSC. Fee: $100 (U. of M. students),
$135 non- U. of M.

VIGIL
Continued from Page 1
aware that they are paying for some-
thing very wrong and inhumane,"
said Van Valey.
School of Social Work student

Julie Blum said that as a woman
with Israeli and American citizen-
ship, she felt it was really important
to attend the vigil.
"I want to stress that violence is
bad, she said. "The matter of blame

in this case is complicated, and both
sides are at fault."
"Supporting the existence of
Israel doesn't mean supporting every
move the Israeli army makes," she
added.

r-

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