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October 05, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-05

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 5, 1990

Nuts and Bolts
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62
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by Judd Winick
TA
bar
STAINED.
by Bill Watterson

Congress holds first meeting
on deficit-reduction proposal

WASHINGTON (AP) -
Congress' first showdown loomed
yesterday on the $500 billion deficit-
cutting plan as an all-out lobbying
blitz by President Bush and top
lawmakers left vote counters opti-
mistic but nervous.
The focus of the battle was in the
House, where despite public expres-
sions of confidence by Democratic
and Republican leaders, aides con-
fided that their vote counts still fell
short of assured passage.
By late Wednesday, each party
was about 40 votes short of getting
majority support in the House for
the measure, with many uncommit-
ted members in both parties, sources
said.
"We're still worried," one Demo-

cratic staff aide said late Wednesday.
"We're still working hard."
Bush summoned 27 Republican
members of congress to the White
House to seek their support for the
plan, which would be the largest
package of tax increases and spend-
ing cuts ever. He dispatched lieu-
tenants to the Capitol to buttonhole
lawmakers in corridors in what one
White House aide called the adminis-
tration's biggest lobbying effort.
"We have people who have
been...advocating certain positions,
coming out of the left, coming out
of the right, coming out of the broad
center, and I'm having to say to
them, 'Now look, lay aside that pas-
sion for that specific issue...and put
the national interest first," Bush told

reporters.
Senate leaders seemed more con-
fident of prevailing in yesterday's
vote, which was to be on a broad
outline of the spending plan.
Congress will vote in two weeks on
a separate measure containing the ac-
tual spending cuts and tax boosts.
The plan would produce $134 bil-
lion in new taxes, $109 billion in
cuts in benefit programs, and about
$200 billion in reduced militar)
spending over the next five years,
including $40 billion in savings in
the fiscal year that started Monday.
Taxes would be raised on alcohol,
tobacco, yachts, gasoline, heating
oil, a small portion of the incomes
of the wealthy and other luxury
items.

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Bush plans r
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Bush administration is preparing a
blueprint for a smaller, less costly
Star Wars shield that could not pro-
tect the United States against an all-
out Soviet ballistic missile attack,
the program's director said yesterday.
The new system, not yet offi-
cially announced, would defend
against "tens or hundreds" of mis-
siles fired accidentally by the Soviets
or deliberately by a Third World
renegade leader, rather than the thou-
sands of missiles that would be ex-
pected to fill the skies in a full-scale
attack by Moscow.
Gulf

educed Star
Henry Cooper, the Pentagon offi-
cial in charge of the Strategic De-
fense Initiative, said in an interview
that the revised anti-missile system
could be deployed more quickly than
the system currently envisioned.
He said he could not give a target
date for deployment or a precise es-
timate of the cost.

Wars costs

1

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$ $

$

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$ BUDGET PRIORITIES COMMITTEE

$
$

$
$

"Reasoned Allocations."

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

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Continued from page 2
possible .-ilitary options - would
be "the 'Chainsaw Massacre' in air
force clothing."
"If we carpet bomb Iraq and mas-
sacre millions, we are no better than
Saddam Hussein himself," Cole said.
Political Science Prof. Ernest
Wilson agreed with Cole saying the
United States should not attack Iraq
"simply to kick Hussein out of
Kuwait." He added, however, that if
Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia, "a mulit-
lateral approach would be required."
The remaining speakers focused
on the economic repercussions of the
Gulf crisis for domestic and interna-
tional markets.

"I would say it's still somewhat
uncertain but obviously less than"
the Pentagon's estimate of $55 bil-
lion for the initial phase of the cur-
rent Star Wars plan.
About $20 billion has been spent
on Star Wars research since 1984.
Economics Prof. Robin Barlow
called the Iraqi takeover of Kuwait
"bank robbery" because of the mas-
sive oil reserves Iraq gained in the
takeover.
Barlow warned that this usurpa-
tion of Iraqi oil by Kuwait would
have far reaching effects for interna-
tional markets by causing "a shift in'
power in OPEC to a more hawkish
policy."'
Prof. Gunter Dufey of the School
of Business Administration showed
hope for the situation by saying that
the higher oil prices resultant of the
Gulf crisis are "severe but not deadly
for Western economies."
"The markets have shown re-
silience... it gives me optimism,"
Dufey said.

The administration is requesting
$4.7 billion for Star Wars in the cur-
rent budget year, but Congress is
expected to shave at least $1 billion
off that figure. The House's version
of the 1991 defense budget set Star
Wars spending at $2.3 billion, a fig-
ure Cooper called "wholly irrespon- t
sible."
Even if Congress adopted the:
$3.7 billion 1991 Star Wars budget
proposed by the Senate, the Pen-
tagon would be forced to "terminate
or mothball" some parts of the pro-
gram, Cooper said.
During the' question and answer
session, an audience member sparked
a small debate among panel mem-.
bers when he asked how effective
they thought the current sanctions
were going to be.
Cole argued that sanctions would
be effective, citing the successful
early 1950's international boycott of
Iran as an example of how sanctions
can work.
Dufey disagreed saying that Iraq
has many sympathizers in the world
which could lead to the breakdown of
sanctions.
"Ultimately only economic pain
will be inflicted and different soci-.
eties have different thresholds of tol-
erance." Dufey added.
- Melissa Peerless contributed to
this report
students, Hopwood Award winners
and other authors read selections
from their material.W
Elisa Lichtenbaum, a 1990 Hop-
wood Award winner describes the
Writers series as a "good forum for
local writers" in a "small ... homey,
and relaxed atmosphere." It's a good
place to hear works from people
"you wouldn't otherwise hear," she
said. As for her own experience with
giving a reading at the Guild House,
she said it's a "really good feeling too
be reading for people."
The weekly Friday Noon Lun-
cheon Forum provides a chance to
eat lunch for $1 and discuss various
topics presented by speakers. Up-
coming topics for this month are in-

First Allocation Application Deadline: OCT 12 by 2p.m.
Student Recognization Forms: Due Every Fri by 3p.m.
Committee Member Application Deadline: OCT 5 by
Work Studies Assistant needed for paid office work.

4p.m.

5 4
.

Religious
Services
A fVVCVAVA

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I

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t

Burger Fresh
Delivers Fresh TM
1 Ye I

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Celebrating50 years of
campus ministry
(1236 Washienaw Cf. " 668-7421/662-2404)
Pastor: Rev. Don Postema
SUNDAY WORSHIP
10 a.m.-World Wide Communion Sunday
6 p.m.-Evening Prayers
WEDNESDAYS
9-10 p.m.-Undergrad Group-join us
for conversation, fun, refreshments
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Church at U-M)
218 N. Division (at Catherine)
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m. at St. Andrews
Supper-6 p.m. at Canterbury House
The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
665-0606
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 F. Huron
Sunday: Worship-9:55 a.m.
Wednesday: Supper & Fellowship-5:30 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
SUNDAYS
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Group-9:30
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest at Hill Street, 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship at 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Worship at 7:30 p.m.
Campus Pastor: John Rollefson
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
331 Thompson Street
Weekend Liturgies: Sat., 5 p.m.,
SUN., 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon, and 5 p.m.
Confessions, Fri., 4-5 p.m.
NEWMAN CLUB SKATING EVENT
SAT., Oct. 6, 6-6:30 p.m.
CATHOLIC INQUIRY CLASS
TUES., Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m.
SCRIPTURE SERIES
WED., Oct 10, 6:30 p.m.
CALL 663-0557 for information
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
SUNDAY: Worship-10:30 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Devotion-9 p.m.
1511 Washtenaw

Elisa Lichtenbaum, a 1990 Hopwood Award
winner describes the Writers series as a
"good forum for local writers" in a "small ...
homey, and relaxed atmosphere"
Another popular event is the elude discussion of the RU486 birth
Writers Series, held every Monday control, a look at life as a University
evening at 8:30 p.m. Local writers, dean, and "the biological arms race."
rbe Lirbigan fli
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 U.S. mail and $28 on campus, for fall only $22.00 U.S. mail.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

GUILD
Continued from page 1
tillas, pumpkin with sugar cane,
and salad. After the meal, everyone
must wash their own dishes.
Karin Tice, an Ann Arbor resi-
dent who has lived in Central Amer-
ica says that the dinners are a good
place to find out about political
events and the situation in Central
America. She said it is a good op-
portunity to associate with friends
and people who have similar inter-
ests, and that it's one of the "few
places where people from the com-
munity and students can come to-
gether to talk and get to know each
other."

A..

EDITOFIAL STAFF:
Editor In Chief
Mwing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Assocists Editors
Weekend Editors
Phto Editor

Noah Rnkel
Kristine LaLonde
Diane CookIan Hoffman
Josh Mink, Noele Vance
David Sdwartz
Stephen Henderson,
1. Mathew Wier
Ronan Lyndh
Kein Woodson
Jose Juaarez

Sports Editor
Asseclats Sports Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Fim
Music
Thaesr

Dike Gil
Andy Gotesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Ryan Sdheiber, Jeff Sheran
Kdsdn Pain, Mnett Peruso
Cardyn Poor
Jen Bilk, BrentEdwads
Pete Shapiro
May Be Banter

News: God Amnuit, Josephine Balenger, Joanna Broder, Michele Clayton, Headher Fee, Juie Foster, Jennier Hid, Chsdne Klooeta,
Amanda Neuman, Dan Poux, Matt Prham, G Renberg, Bethany Robertson, Sarah Sdweitzer, Stefanie Vinesonna Woodwel.
Opinion: Tom Abowd, David Bryce, Mark Buchan hike Fischer, Lesie Heirun, David Levin,Mdre iy, Jemner Mattson, Chrs
Nordstrom, Dawn Paulinsid, Tony Siber, Glynn Wasingn, Kevin Woodson..
Sports: Ken Ariz, Andy Brown, Mike Bes, Wait Butzu, JetfsCameron, Steve Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy 0eKote, Mat Dodge, Josh
Dubow, Jen Durst, Scof Ersk i, Phil Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Abert Lin, Rod Lowenthal, Adam Mier, Jahn Niyo, Sarah
Osbum, Matt Rennie, David Schediter, Ken Sigura, Andy Stabile, Dan Zod.
Arts: Mark Binell, Greg Baise,Jerie Dahimari, Forrest Green II, Mike Kunilavsky, izabedh Lenhard, David Lubiner, Mile Molter,
Ronald Scott, Sue Uselmann, Kin Yaged, Nabeel Zubed,
Photo: Anthony M. Crdl, Jenniler Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Kdssy Goodman, Kenneh Smoler,
Weekend: Phi Cohen, Miguel Cruz, Donnaladipaco, Jesse Waker, Fred Zinn.

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