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October 01, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-10-01

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 1, 1990

Guess who's coming

to dinner... yow
program, but thought that more "With the direction of student
ur- needed to be done because students leaders in sponsoring programs,
am feel uncomfortable about approach- faculty meals present an excellent
has ing faculty members.

r TA?

by Lisa Sanchez
Don't be surprised if you bump
elbows at the salad bar with one of
your professors in the cafeteria
tonight.
The Housing Division and Office
of Residence Education are pro-
moting the Faculty Meal Program
through brochures and posters telling
students to feel free to invite their
professors for residence hall meals.
The professors' meals are free.
Housing Program Director Robin
Sarris hopes this venture will
"personalize (the) individual exper-
ience" of the student. Increased in-

formal student-faculty contact is
meant to "blend the learning in the
classroom with the learning outside
the classroom," she said.
Sarris said the goals of the Faulty
Meal Program are two-fold: students
are given the opportunity to meet
individually with their professors,
while faculty members are encour-
aged to tour the students' home
environment.
Students taking advantage of the
Faculty Meal Program need only to
seize the initiative and forward an
invitation. Faculty members may
receive the guest meal ticket at the

residence hall's front desk.
History Professor Rhoads M
phey said the Faculty Meal Progr
is not a new idea. In the past, he I
taken part in faculty meals not o
in the residence halls, but also
fraternity and sorority houses.
has mentioned the program in tw(
his larger lectures, yet no one1
approached him about the meals.
"Hopefully, this renewed inter
will encourage more people to t
part," Murphey said.
Tiziana Dearing, a resid
advisor in South Quad, had posit
feelings about the goals of

nly
in
He
a of
has
rest
ake
ent
tive
the

'With the direction of student leaders in
sponsoring programs, faculty meals present an
excellent way to break the barriers between
students and faculty'
- Tiziana Dearing
South Quad RA

Earlier this month, South Quad
sponsored a faculty dinner and
invited professors to dine with a
number of students.

way to break the barriers between
students and faculty," Dearing said.
She added that it was a fantastic
experience for her residents to be

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson

I GOTN A INJGOT A
PERFECT PERFc.'
SCORE ON SCORE?
M'{ 4UM

W41AT 910 1IU IRAN OUTY
GET? 1F NO' OF TIME ! Dl
MISSED AM{, 4 ME HAD A
l~oo oE ME PER.FECT SZ
2S CEKT'S. 1TOO WI' D 1M

Iws BIo1.oI!
WMT- a10D GiRLS MATURE
)Q GE.T? FASWR ThN O{S!
c(J JUS3T GOT A
BE~TTERGRAOlE
BECAUJSE NO~t- A
GIRL! IlT WHOFAIR!
0~

I

mmgE lIS OP5VT
PAY pA t! MK AM. N25E
UiP. Xs MEAN W AN SWERS
AR~E CORRFCT/ tM.
O q A" s WREIAN(
IT ! I WI E BET .
Lq

1 BOYCOTT

Continued from page 1
ployer interfering in this right shall
be engaged in "unfair labor prac-
tices."
The local action is part of a na-
tional boycott including 35 law
schools in the Law Students
Coalition for Worker's Rights and is
coordinated by Frontlash, the youth
branch of the AFL-CIO. Although
the organization has compiled a list
of 17 "union-busting" firms, only
five of them are interviewing at
Michigan this year.
According to Frontlash Director
Joel Klaverkamp, the firms advise
company managers to employ psy-
chological scare tactics to prevent
organization.
"They tell employees that unions
are violent, corrupt, evil institutions
that are only out for your money,"
said Klaverkamp. He added that

some firms tell corporations to hire
more women because of their
"docile" nature.
The Labor Relations Act,
Klaverkamp asserted, is difficult to
enforce especially under the previous
and current administrations.
A. Samuel Cook, a senior partner
in the Baltimore law firm Venable,
Baetjer, Howard, and Civiletti -
one of the firms being boycotted,
has written a four-page response
denying the "union-busting" accusa-
tions. He said, however, the AFL-
CIO is doing him a favor by keeping
his firm on the boycott list. If law
students feel uncomfortable working
with management then he suggests
they not waste time interviewing
with his firm.
Cook contended that his firm can
be held to the highest ethical stan-
dards, and said, "When (the) union's
own staffs try to organize they have
engaged in illegal, unfair labor

Calvin and Hobbes

H4{o ID YOU I f LQ
MAW QUItz? BE(
TIT
~v

JNIED IT
AVJSE I1
O1 W*OF
ME.

W~E WOR~ST IPW~, TNWUGI4,
WP$S T"NT VS'S'E DERVNS
WOR OUR 6ET ON W10' 0
GET M BIETERS£COE.
1 4AAT PM ER 25 CETS.

BUT GET Tut.,

I GAEN E D "El
I/ I(GV

R'

by Bill Watterson
I THIk'i 9 09, NONW
BF-TM.RSTkDN if T You
AROE. START ON
ME.
1 .
Z^ N

able to talk one-on-one with their
professors.
Mike Maes, an engineerin
sophomore, intends to ask hi
professor to lunch when the big
exam approaches. He said the
Faculty Meal Program "gives me the
chance to ask questions to prepare
for the exam, in a sort of very
informal office hours, only better
because, without the professor's
work nearby, I'll have his focused
attention."
Students may invite an4
instructor to participate in the
Faculty Meal Program, including
professors, TAs, or lecturers.
practices."
Despite the efforts of the guild,
Venable, Baetjer, Howard, and
Civiletti had a full day of interviews
last Thursday.
"I understand why some of th
students boycotted them, but I don''
agree with the reasons," said law
student Jane Boland, who inter-
viewed with the firm. "I'm not en-
tirely in favor of unions."
Another law school student said
she was unaware of the boycott.
"You hear different things, and you
can't keep them all straight," she
added.
The idea for such a boycott origi*
nated in 1984 at Harvard University
Law School as the brainchild of
Michael Dinnerstein, a student at the
time. In 1986, more than 200
Harvard law students signed a peti-
tion in which they agreed not to in-
terview or accept positions at a
number of "union-busting" firms.
gotten in just because they are girls,
they haven't even ID'd some oo
them."
"You can get a fake ID for $40
to $50," said Jason White, first-year
LSA student, "But I wouldn't,
there's always frat parties."
Using a fake ID is a misdemeanor
and is punishable by a $100 fine
and/or 90 days in jail. Suspension o
the individual's driver's license is
also possible.
Federal governments.
The "new town within a city"
concept was highlighted in the 1987
Detroit strategic planning project.
Young has touted the idea for several
years.
"This is hope," said attorney
David Baker Lewis, who helped draft
the strategic planning project three
years ago. " I don't think all the
ideas are feasible or would be em-
braced, but it's a start."
Col, Andrew Duncan, assistant
director for information at the Inter-
national Institute of Strategic Stud-
ies, endorsed what he called a scatter-
shot search for peaceful solution be-
ing pursued by individuals and
groups in the Arab world and the
West.

Nuts and Bolts
50 RACEL. BROK(E 1SINGCS OFF
WITH YOtU . ,.
YEAH-, SHE SCUD
77 AT -AT OUR
AGE'A SERIOUS
RSA'O4%I;p £wuLD
L' DTRIMENTAL

-t

""In

1
!if
{{ w....
,} ,.
rF
r. , -
-

by Judd Winick
wMo'S Gsjr23!°iNG
SIDE ARE.YO ON?!
I UAS JS-
Z DON'T WANT TRUTHT
MAt.Z WANT S!MPXWY!

Continued from Page 1
FAKE
a busy night at Rick's Cafe, said a
manager who has noticed a decrease
since the 21-year-old admittance rule
has been in effect and since they
started turning IDs into police.
The management at Good Time
Charley's refused comment.
Turning in fake IDs does not
solve the problem, said Mike Ray,
an engineering senior. "Students can
always find someone to buy for

them," he said.
"People are going to go around
'My friends have
gotten in just because
they are girls, they
haven't even ID'd
some of them'
- Diana Rodriguez
LSA first-year student
rules," said LSA first-year student
Diana Rodriguez, "My friends have

Corner the Business Job Market
Computer Science and other Engineering graduates
Combine your computer experience and knowledge with your interest in business: The
Real Estate Department of Goldman, Sachs & Co. is interviewing for Financial46ystems
Analysts.
Who is Goldman Sachs?
Goldman, Sachs & Co. is a full-service investment banking and securities firm serving
corporations, institutions, governments and individuals worldwide. Established in 1869,
we are one of the oldest, largest and most strongly capitalized firms in the industry.
The Real Estate Department is involved in arranging sales and financings of real estate
assets, mortgage transactions, mergers & acquisitions, and portfolio restructurings for
clients around the world. For example, we arranged the $850 million financing of the
tallest building in the world, the Sears Tower in Chicago.
What is a Financial Systems Analyst?
Financial Systems Analysts develop and maintain the department's software and hard-
ware systems. We use computers for diverse tasks ranging from valuing Real Estate
assets to keeping track of investors and clients. Analysts also become involved in the
valuation of properties and the execution of transactions.
If you are interested in a fast-paced environment, working with the latest technology in
networks, databases and communications in order to solve business and finance prob-
lems, we would like to talk to you. We will be on campus again in the spring; fall inter-
views are primarily for Winter graduates.

DETROIT
Continued from page 1
erty at no cost.
Mayor Coleman Young met a
few months ago with PRIDE offi-
cials and asked for more details of
the plan, mayoral spokesperson Bob
Berg said yesterday.
"He backs the concept but he has
not gone over the specifics," Berg
said. "He has been saying that he
SADDAM
Continued from page 1
Dominique Moisi, deputy director
of the French Institute for Interna-
tional Relations in Paris, said he
would "love to see a diplomatic op-
tion" but "it would mean that...Sad-
dam Hussein gives in to Western
pressure, and it's rather unlikely."
A compromise is still possible,

supports the idea of re-developing
that area."
Questions to parties involved in
the proposal were referred to
Michigan National Chair Robert
Mylod, who refused to comment on
it, the Detroit News said.
Several specifics were undeter-
mined, including how the project
would be financed. The Developers
said they would need complete coop-
eration with the city, state and
he said, in which Iraq would with-
draw in return for agreement to hold
an international conference to rede-
fine Kuwait's boundaries, give Iraq
access to the sea and redistribute
Kuwaiti oil reserves.
"But I do not see it in the cards
right now," Moisi said. "Maybe in
the very beginning a diplomatic op-
tion might have been open. Now it's
a bit late."

GARBAGE
Continued page 1
The resolution also states that all
workers whose jobs would be lost
would be transferred to other city de-
partments or absorbed by the private
contractor.
Judy Levy, a local AFSCME of-
ficial, said, "I am against subcon-

tracting work... I have a distinct feel-
ing workers would receive much less
and the owners much more."
The department needs the extra*
revenue to make up for a $1.7 mil-
lion deficit. Increasing costs for
transport and dumping at the Brown-
ing-Ferris Industries (BFI) landfill in
Salem Township account for much
of the deficit.

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Who:
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Bachelor's degree graduates in:
Computer Science
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Other engineering and technical fields
Tuesday, October 16, 1990
Engineering Placement Center, Stearns Building
Sign up at the Placement Center:

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