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September 27, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-09-27

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 27, 1990

__ --_

UAW-GM
contract
likely to be
ratified
DETROIT (AP) - A new labor agreement contain-
ing three years of income guarantees for about 300,000
General Motors Corp. workers appeared headed toward
certain ratification by the United Auto Workers union;
yesterday-
Even UAW Local 594 at GM's Truck & Bus Group
plant in Pontiac, a center of support for the UAW di.ssi-
'dent New Directions Movement, voted 77 percent in fa-
vor of the contract in ratification balloting yesterday.
The decision to ratify the contract was somewhat
historic for the local.
"This is the first one we've ratified in nine years,"
said Howard Farnsworth, a shop committee member.
The local voted to reject tentative agreements in 1984
and again in 1987. "Finally we get to ratify one here at
594.,'
At other locals, ratification margins were much
higher, as much as 98 percent, for example, among pro-
duction workers at GM's Arlington, Texas assembly
plant.
The union said it would release results at the end of
the month after ballots from all 155 locals at GM
plants were counted. Union members in many of the
large plants, including assembly and stamping opera-
tions, were set to vote today and Friday.
The CAW and the UAW, which split in 1985, said
the contract they reached first would be used as a pattern
for agreements with other automakers.

Sunbelt may

pay ro
WASHINGTON (AP) - Slap-
ping taxes on Sunbelt states to cover
the savings and loan bailout, an idea
pushed by some Michigan lawmak-
ers, would be unfair and probably
would backfire, a financial industry
consultant said yesterday.
All taxpayers should the cleanup
burden, said Bert Ely, a conservative
advocate of federal deposit insurance
reform. The thrift crisis resulted
from defects in the insurance pro-
gram, which benefits the entire na-
tion by keeping the banking system
afloat, he said.
"Attempting to impose this loss,
particularly in a punitive manner, on
select groups of taxpayers would be
unfair and counterproductive for the
economy," Ely told a task force
established by the House Banking
Committee.
The panel is studying who should
pay the hundreds of millions of dol-
lars needed to rescue the ailing thrift
industry.

But consumer advocates and
members of Congress sharply dis-
agreed, saying people who had prof-
ited from government policies that
caused the crisis bear a dispropor-
tionate responsibility for fixing the
problem.
"Although we have rigorou
regulated our state-chartered thrifN,
we are being stuck with billions of
dollars in costs from a state which
did not," said Rep. Howard Wolpe
(D-Mich).
The Lansing Democrat asked for
support of a bill he introduced as
chair of the 18-state Northeast-Mid-
west Congressional Coalition.
Noting that many of the faid
thrifts are state-chartered, he
carelessness and lax regulation by
state governments were a little-no-
ticed cause of the S&L crisis.
His bill would establish a for-
mula for determining which states
caused an "excessive" share of the
problem.

JOSE JUAREZ/Day
Yo!
Yo-Master Zeemo, an Ann Arbor resident and U-M alumnus, practices yo-yo tricks near the
Diag yesterday evening. He is one of a few professional yo-yo masters in the Midwest, and
he practices on the Diag whenever he has time.

e

CUTBACK
Continued from page 1
people they already have as clients,
they need to turn away cases that
they would have accepted (in the
past)," Allen said. "When students
go in to seek advice, and legal con-
sultation, they won't be able to get
the kind of quality they got in the
past."
All landlord and tenant cases,
which used to be handled on an indi-
vidual basis, are now being handled
in clinics, said Michael Appel, a
staff member of the Housing Law
Reform Project, a subsidiary of
SLS.
Appel said everyone pitches in
with secretarial duties, since the re-
ceptionist, Carol Burry, is leaving.
Burry said the cutback was an impor-
tant consideration in her leaving.
Employees of SLS have gone
without raises for two years, said

Roumel. There is no prospect of pay
hikes in the future, he added.
Members of SLS have speculated
that the organization's financial
problem lies with its connection
with MSA. Most of the members of
SLS agreed that the organization
would be better off if it were funded
by a direct allocation from students.
Student Legal Services was estab-
lished in 1979 to provide legal repre-
sentation to University students in-
cluding court representation by at-
torneys and paralegals in virtually
any civil or criminal matter. SLS
represents and advises approximately
two to three thousand students per
year.
Students pay $1.00 towards SLS
per semester.

ASSAULT
Continued from page 1
Ann Arbor Police Department where
a report was filed.
Police have no leads or suspects
in the assault, Brecher said.
Captain Volker Gaul, a ROTC
instructor and University ROTC
public affairs officer, said in the two
and a half years he has been at the
ROTC, there has never been a phys-
ical attack on a cadet in uniform.
"Verbal abuse happens...students
get chided for being in the service.
This is the first time there has been
a physical confrontation," Gaul said.
ROTC is taking no special pre-
cautionary measures against similar
attacks other than warning their
cadets to be careful and "use good
judgement," said Colonel Peter Bu-
ley, the commander of the Air Force
ROTC unit.
Gaul said the ROTC will not

change its uniform policy, which re-
quires cadets to wear their unifora
to certain classes, unless another
physical attack occurs.
ROTC junior Tim Gilhool said
fear of a similar attack would not de-
ter him or other cadets from wearing
their uniforms on campus.
"People might wear their uni-
forms more often. We have a lot of
pride in what we do, it's not jus
weekend thing. If you hit us, V
won't stand for it," Gilhool said.
"I have no qualms about wearing
my uniform," Brecher said.
First-year ROTC trainee Eric
Todd is a member of the physical
training group of which Brecher is in
charge. Brecher told the group about
the assault yesterday morning.
"She (Brecher) seemed disturbed,
but she is strong and is handling
herself well," Todd said. "She hasn't
lost confidence."

Calvinand Hobbes

by Bill Watterson

li

-

I

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.5

Corner the Business Job Market
Computer Science and other Engineering graduates
Combine your computer experience and knowledge with your interest in business: The
Real Estate Department of Goldman, Sachs & Co. is interviewing for FinancialSystems
Analysts.
Who is Goldman Sachs?
Goldman, Sachs & Co. is a full-service investment banking and securities firm serving
corporations, institutions, governments and individuals worldwide. Established in 1869,
we are one of the oldest, largest and most strongly capitalized firms in the industry.
The Real Estate Department is involved in arranging sales and financings of real estate
assets, mortgage transactions, mergers & acquisitions, and portfolio restructurings for
clients around the world. For example, we arranged the $850 million financing of the
tallest building in the world, the Sears Tower in Chicago.
What is a Financial Systems Analyst?
Financial Systems Analysts develop and maintain the department's software and hard-
ware systems. We use computers for diverse tasks ranging from valuing Real Estate
assets to keeping track of investors and clients. Analysts also become involved in the
valuation of properties and the execution of transactions.
If you are interested in a fast-paced environment, working with the latest technology in
networks, databases and communications in order to solve business and finance prob-
lems, we would like to talk to you. We will be on campus again in the spring; fall inter-.
views are primarily for Winter graduates.

PULLED 61 SPACEMAN
SPIK, PLMAET 6 1S
ABWT TO COlL1DE
WITN PLMET 5!

VW O TMETO OSE,
OkiR NERD.OCovs LOOETH4E
2AkO. R NRID FC5TO
WE"

THE PLANETS CRASH, GQRwG AD
C~mAUvk D lb DST! OA CO ~REMiAINS!

TIME ! Pas
6{ S= lot)PPAPSP$
FOIZNA5RD.
TIME ?! I JUST
FI~tSEIED THE~
a PIRST PRBLEM!

LZ

(~j 990 nivesal ressSy=dcat

Nuts and Bolts
OH GOD~, EAC4E-L
'5 DuMPlNGME l UMO5
Y KNOW JHOWI
-~MUCH ZICAR~E
_ o A5CVr YOU, AND
YO0U*VE BEEN
0 50 +SOGOOD 1T'4ME.-
1 t 0

HERE IT COM'ES
BUT =
t / DON'T TH-INK
! Q!((COUR RE.LATIO.J -
/(, poSN*IP CAN WORK
00Oo ANYM ORE.
0
0
e' r /rt

-1 THINKYOUR WO4 W ERR
BUT X DON'T -THINK THIS
IS RIGaNT FOR EiTHER
OF US.
oO
LEAsT SHE
DIDN'T SAY ...,

by Judd Winick
_ THINK WE SHOULD JO-ST
BE FRIENDS.
4k
N N
RADY c70
BLO COW

101

J V

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
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PHONE NUMBERS: News (313)764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
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GO BLUE!!!
from all of us
at
DASCOLA STYLISTS

I

E

EDITORAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
MAnqing Editor
NWws Editors
Opinion Editor
As"oca"Editors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Noah Finkel
Kisne LaLnde
Diane Cook, Ian Holknan
Josh M iiok, NodeVance
David Scwwartz
Stien Henderson,
LMa~m Mille
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez

Sports Editor
hmoat Sports Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Rilm
Music
Theaer

Andy Gote M~
David Nym, F*doLsmnont
Ryan Sdvr*er,. JslShoran
Carolyn P4%r
Jon 81K Wnt Edwrds
Forrest Geen III
May StBarber

Who:
When:
Where:
How:

Bachelor's degree graduates in:
Computer Science
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Other engineering and technical fields
Tuesday, October 16, 1990
Engineering Placement Center, Steams Building
Sign up at the Placement Center:

Opposite Jacobson's
668-9329

Big

News: Gei Anluit Josepine Balenger, Joanna Broder, Mchele paya, Heather Fee, Juie Foster, Chrisne looota, nanda
Neuman, Dan Poux, Malt Pullam, Gi Renberg, Bethany Robertson, Sarah Schweitzer, Steanie Vines, DnnaaWoodwe.
Opinion: Tom Abod, David Bryce, Mark Buchan, Mike Fischer, Lesle Heltbunn, David Levi ,Androw LevyJonnie Mason, Clvis
Nordstom, Dawn Paiknsdd, Tony Siber, Glynn Washingt, Kevin Woodson..
Sports: Ken Arz, Andy Brown, Mk Bess, Walt Btzu, Jeff Cameron, Se Cohen, Theodore Cox~ Andy DeKo e, Mat Dodg Joh"
Dubow, Jeni Dust, Scot Er nkie, RA Green, R.C. Healom David Kraft, Abert Lin, Rod Lowentad, Ada Mier,John Nyo Seh
Ourn, MatRennie, David Sdbechler, Ken SiguraAndy Sal, Dan Zoi.
Arts: Mak Bnd, kGreg Balse,Jenie Dahlmann, Mike Kuidavuky, Elzabelh Lenhard, David Lubiner, Wke MCdtoX, Renald Soc, Pere
Sh*o, KinYaged, NabeelZubed,
Phot Anhony M. Croll, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldmn, Kdssy Goodmn, Kem h Smoler,
Weefund: PhilCohennUguel Cruz, Donna lad Wo,.Jesse Wake, FredZinn.

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