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September 26, 1990 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, September 26, 1990

Students'

arrests increase

College
College Press

parties
Service

end in clashes with police

Lunch-
time
:reading
First-year LSA
studentDan
Whang takes
advantage of one
of the last few
nice days to relax
outdoors as he
studies near the
Graduate Library.

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The school year has opened with
a seemingly unusual number of
mass arrests on campuses
nationwide.
A number of private student par-
ties, a mainstay of the season as col-
legiates return to campus, have
sometimes eroded into violent con-
frontations with police.
Big parties, sometimes spilling
outdoors from apartments and frater-
nity houses, have ended in clashes at
various universities in recent weeks.
Observers cite relatively new
minimum drinking age laws and a
new willingness to crack down on
student drinking for the increased
number of confrontations.
Students say their social lives are
effectively being pushed out of bars
RooMs
Continued from page 1
problems created by overcrowded
classroom, such as students not be-
ing able to see chalkboards or hear
professors, University officials are
examining ways to improve class-
room facilities.
Halloway said there have been
proposals to add chalkboards, desks
and transparencies to rooms in Ma-
son Hall, Angel Hall, and the Frieze
Building. However, he added the is-
sue has been discussed for at least
five years without many concrete re-
sults.
Before improvements can be
made, Halloway said the situation
must be thoroughly studied to know
where the problems lie, to aid, Hal-
loway's office is planning to send
questionnaires to teaching assistants
and professors to evaluate the rooms.
Though overcrowding has the po-
tential of being a fire safety hazard,
Robert Patrick, assistant administra-
tor of Public Safety, said the Uni-
versity's rooms are safer than those
at other institutions.
"We try to check on all of the
rooms and make sure that they are
safe. However, if more fire exits are
needed or something else then we get
it as soon as we can. Safety is not
the problem," Patrick said.
More overcrowding problems
could be solved, if there was better
communication between professors
and the Room Scheduling Office,
said Stella Theros, administrative as-
sistant in the Room Scheduling Of-
fice.
"Sometimes after professors
change rooms, they don't tell us..."
Theros said. "We need to be better
informed about room changes before
we can help anyone. More people
should be made aware of this prob-
lem," she said.

and sponsored campus functions and
into supervised private parties.
Now many schools are trying to
break up, or at least regulate, the
private student parties, too.
Many collegiates think their
"unspoken rights as college students
are being violated," said Felix
Savino, head of the Drug and Alco-
hol program at the University of
Wisconsin, where Madison police
have been busy breaking up large
private parties this fall.
Moves to break up parties ended
in tragedy at the University of Ari-
zona, where a campus security police
officer was killed at a fraternity party
on Aug. 24, when he tried to wrest a
gun from an angry student during
what is usually the biggest party
weekend of the semester.

The killing has led to an invita-
tion-only rule at fraternity parties.
One day later, on Aug. 25,
University of New Mexico (UNM)
campus police arrested 14 students
attending a Lambda Chi Alpha street
party that apparently got out of
hand.
In the process, police barricaded
the streets of the school's fraternity
row, brought in a canine unit and
then turned the episode into a racial
issue by first trying to round up stu-
dents at Alpha Phi Alpha, the only
predominantly black fraternity in the
area.
"When they got there, the action
they took was against us," com-
plained Shihunwa Crum, head of the
Black Student Union.

I

MrCHIGAN .
W~~r es

----------- -"-- ii=q
T.A. Peter Webb's English 167 class is overcrowded, forcing first-year LSA
student Julie Weeder to stand through class.

1140 South University

Prof. Edward Gramlich, chair of
the Undergraduate Economics De-
partment, explained such room
changes: "Lots of departments are
congested. The problem is that if
you close a course you prevent stu-
dents who need it for graduation re-
quirements to get in. And, if you
open it then it is too big, and you
have overcrowded rooms."
The long-term problems remain,
but suggestions are being made to

resolve them.
Stuart recommended more space
be added until the long-term problem
of overcrowded rooms is resolved.
"We could rent out space at the
Michigan Theater. But what we need
to do is solve the long-term problem
by reallocating resources so academic

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