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April 24, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-04-24

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 24, 1990

Graduation After 4 Years

Graduation After 5 Years

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GAPS
Continued from Page 1
However, Story emphasized the
need to get a commitment to reten-
tion from the professorate who teach
outside the program. "I don't think
(many professors) now see retention
as part of their jobs," Story said.
Faculty often think, "We already
have a program - CSP - whose
job it is to make adjustment of mi-
norities to the University work."
The University has established a
commission to work in part to in-
crease the retention and graduation of
students of color. Moody said the
commission will take recommenda-
tions made by past committees and
turn them into policies that can be
implemented in the fall.
The commission, which recently

met for the first time, will be work-
ing this summer to create the poli-
cies, Matlock said. In the end, "every
academic unit should be looking at
retention and have some kind of re-
tention program," he added.
Goals of the commission will in-
clude meeting the "full financial
needs of all underrepresented minor-
ity students who are Michigan resi-
dents" and expanding the financial
aid resources available to out-of-state
underrepresented minority students,
according to a memo written by
Moody in November of 1989 outlin-
ing his hopes for the newly-founded
commission.
Also in the memo, Moody set as
an objective of developing and im-
plementing a "comprehensive plan
to enhance minority student suc-
cess."

Graduation After 6 Years
904

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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Christian sects in Jerusalem
object to Jewish settlement
JERUSALEM - Christian shrines in the Holy Land will close Friday
and ring a funeral toll from their belltowers to protest a government-
funded Jewish settlement in the Old City's Christian quarter, church
leaders said.
The announcement came one day after the Israeli government con-
firmed that it put up $1.8 million to help finance the settlement of 150
Jews in a 72-room complex near the Church of the Holy Sepulcher.
The settlement, set up on April 11, has provoked angry demonstra-
tions by Christian clerics and Palestinians, both Christian and Moslem.
In announcing Friday's daylong protest, the leaders of 10 religions in
the Holy Land said government support for the settlement "endangers the
survival of all Christian communities in the Holy City."
The Greek church, which says a former tenant illegally leased the
compound, got a court order to have the Jews evicted. The Supreme court
will consider an appeal of the order on Thursday.
Jude dismisses child-abuse
charge against cocaine mom
MUSKEGON, Mich. - A judge yesterday dismissed a child-abuse
charge against a welfare mother accused of delivering cocaine to her baby
via the umbilical cord.
Muskegon County Circuit Judge R. Max Daniels ruled there was no
evidence that crack cocaine used by Kimberly Hardy caused the low
birthweight and gastrointestinal problems of her son, born last August.
Daniels, however, denied Hardy's motion to dismiss the cocaine
delivery charge, a 20-year felony. Her trial is scheduled for June.
Police say Hardy, the first woman in Michigan to face such a charge,
admitted she smoked crack 13 hours before the birth. A drug test ordered
two days later showed signs of cocaine in the baby's system.
Hardy has seen her infant son only a few times. "We've never bonded
because he was taken from me right from the hospital," she said, adding
that she has kicked her addiction through drug treatment.
U.S. base greets ex-hostage
WIESBADEN, West Germany - Freed American hostage Robert
Polhill checked into a hospital suite and spent his first day of freedom
yesterday savoring scrambled eggs and bacon and enjoying an afternoon
snooze.
U.S. officials, who plan to question Polhill about his nearly three
years in captivity, gave the 55-year-old professor a day off to rest and un-
dergo routine medical tests. He was released Sunday.
They said Polhill, held by a pro-Iranian group, was likely a captive in
the same building as two American colleagues, but they doubted he would
know much about any of the other 15 Western hostages in Lebanon.
Meanwhile, there were reports from Tehran and Lebanon that a second
hostage release may be in the offing. But news reports in Tehran and
Beirut and a Pro-Iranian Shiite cleric said the U.S. would have to recipro-
cate.

0

0

50 -

40 --
1974

I a I le

1976

1978

1980

1982

19841

Year Enrolled

i

CAR
Continued from Page 1
Body panels covered with solar
cells will power the Sunrunner and
are scheduled to be completed in two

weeks, Lynch said.
The work required to finish the
car will continue this summer by a
30-student crew, many of whom
gave up summer engineering intern-
ships to contribute to the project.
However, the construction and
testing of the car are merely the tip
of the iceberg of preparation under-
taken by the 110-member team.
The route's intricacies, such as
stop signs and changes in elevation,
have been studied by the team. Dave
Bell, race strategy group leader,
spent his Spring Break driving to
Florida and back to record the race
route.
"The race is interesting in that

the quality of cars and drivers will be
similar; therefore, strategy is very
important," he said.
Bell explained that with thorough
knowledge of the course and predic-
tions from a team of 10 meteorology
graduate students, the solar car team
can gain an advantage over other less
prepared teams.
In addition, the use of an 18-
wheel trailer with a complete auto
lab in its back half has been secured
for transportation of the Sunrunner.
But extensive preparations cannot
be made for free. The solar car team
has raised more than $750,000 in
cash and donations to support their
effort.

"It's simple: money equals
speed," said Lynch, one of the prin-
ciple fundraisers for the project.
"Based on the fact that we've raised
more money than other teams, the
rumors seem to be that we're the fa-
vorite."
Fancy agreed. "I think we are the
favorites. We have the biggest bud-
get by far." But she added the team's
primary goal is a top three finish.
The top three finishers in this
summer's Sunrayce will be invited
to compete in the World Solar Chal-
lenge in Australia next fall. GM,
winner of last year's Solar Chal-
lenge, will partially fund those three
teams.

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by Bill Watterson
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In the dark?
We've got Hylights
Daily Sports

U.S. officials said they had no information that a second release "was
going to happen."
Amtrak derailment injures 83
BATAVIA, Iowa - A 19-car Amtrak passenger train derailed
yesterday, injuring at least 83 of the 400 people aboard, authorities said.
Seven cars of the eastboundCalifornia Zephyr derailed about1:25 p.n.
on Burlington Northern tracks, authorities said. Eyewitnesses counted as
many as nine cars off the track.
The train was carrying 394 passengers and about 20 crew members,
said Debbie Hare, an Amtrak spokesperson in Chicago.
Area hospitals reported receiving at least 83 people from the accident,
10 of whom were hurt seriously enough to be admitted.
Iowa State Patrol Lt. Ronald Moon said there were no known deaths.
Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and
Burlington Northern were dispatched to the scene.
The train had 12 passenger cars, four baggage cars and three
locomotives, said Sue Martin, an Amtrak spokesperson in Washington.
EXTRAS
Fat-like gel replaces cream
in new oat bran ice cream
BOSTON - Government food scientists looking for a healthier way
to satisfy forbidden cravings said yesterday they have created the ultimate
in guilt-free desserts - oat bran ice cream.
Actually, calling it ice cream is stretching it a bit, for it has none of
the fat-filled cream that is an essential ingredient for the real thing. In-
stead, it gets its creamy consistency from a tasteless, fat-like gel that's
made entirely from oats.
Its principal creator, George Inglett, calls this secret ingredient OatriM.
He said it could take the place of fat in many cold foods, including may-
onnaise, cheese spreads, salad dressings and margarine.
"It has a double whammy," Inglett said. "It will replace animal fat,
such as cream, in desserts. And it acts in the body to lower cholesterol."
able £ir4infliI
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 in-town and $39 out-of-town, for fall only $18.00 in-town and $22.00 out-of-town.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
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EARN WHILE YOU LEARN
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