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March 26, 1990 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-26

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The Michigan Daily - Sports Monday - March 26, 1990 - Page 3

Richard Eisen

Loyola Marymount fans look for their Lions to defeat UNLV before yesterday's West Regional final. However,
the Runnin' Rebels shut down the explosive Lion team to advance to their third Final Four.
U spFinLal Four teams set
TUNLV stops Loyola's emotional ran

All right, I'm not going to be embarrassed about
it, so I'm just going to come out and say it. Here it
is: My NCAA pool is shot to pieces.
And may it rest in pieces all over my floor.
Why, oh why were there so many upsets in this
year's tournament? Does it just seem like there were
an incredible amount of them or were there truly a
boat load of upsets this year? Because I want to
know.
What an exciting tournament we've had so far.
Some folks even say it's the most exciting sporting
event on the face of the planet. After this year's
World Series and Super Bowl was brought to us by
Sleepinol, I'd have to agree that the tourney delivers
the most emotional, action-packed sporting events
that money can buy.
So, if this is true, how come all I worry about is
my damn pool? Because the tournament is also the
best sporting event that can bring me money?
Possibly. All these upsets and heart-stopping buzzer
beaters have destroyed my beloved picks; one by one,
the favorites fell, leaving my pool flapping in the
wind.
When Duke beat Connecticut Saturday, I didn't
think of how bad I truly feel for Huskie coach Jim
Calhoun, whose lifelong dream is to coach in a Final
Four game, or senior guard Tate George, who spent
years of futility in Connecticut only to see his hopes
of a title spill away from him in the form of a
Christian Laettner jump shot.
No. All I thought was, "Jeez, my pool is shot." Is
this in the spirit of the tournament? Should I feel
guilty?
Who the hell wins these pools
anyway? I can't pick these upsets
anymore; there are too many of
them. How can anyone win this
year's tournament pool with all
these no-name teams advancing to
the round of eight?
What was Texas doing in the
final eight? Didn't they know I had
them losing in the first round to
Georgia? Am I asking too many
questions? Regardless, Longhorn
coach Tom Penders did a tremen-
dous job bringing his team from
out of left field and into national
prominence. Too bad he did it at the
expense of my pool. Penders
Now, let's get to Xavier, which knocked out
Georgetown, the team I picked to reach Denver from
the Midwest Region. They cost me major, major
points and because of it, I rooted against them. Is this
sick? Someone help me out. I might be in dire men-
tal straights here and not know it.
Muskateer coach Pete Gillen, like Penders, told
his team they could achieve the impossible and they

Upsets abound in
LMarch Madness
believed him. One of the hottest coaches around,
Gillen was up for Michigan's position last year and
now seems headed for Miami, FL.
Gillen, however, must work on his appearance as
he looks like what my mom would call a "schme'n-
drick." His jacket sleeves end at his elbows and his
hair looks like it was cut by Stooge Moe's barber.
Alas, this is petty; I'm only saying this because he
cost me 28 beloved points.
UCLA cost me the most points of any team in the
tournament when they knocked out Kansas, which r'
picked to lose to UNLV in the final game April 2.
With time running out, the Bruins, one point downi,
sent first-year player Tracy Murray to the line to
shoot two free throws. What a nice story, a first-year
player with the opportunity to restore respectability
to UCLA and send them to the Final 16 for the fitst
time in 10 years.
I, however, didn't see it this way. I mean 60 pool
points hung in the balance here. In fact, I was reduced
to the state of screaming "Noonan! Noonan!" at the
television when Murray calmly corded those two free -
throws.
Some teams, however, helped me out. Like Mich-
igan State, for instance. The key to picking pools is
not only to guess upsets but to also pick correctly
which highly ranked team will choke. Enter Michigan
State.
To be fair about it, however, the Spartans got
robbed. Kenny Anderson's shot at the end of regula-
tion left his hand after the buzzer sounded. Poor State.
But, the more I thought about it, the happier I
became. They were lucky to have
advanced that far in the first place.
Kirk "I look like Boo Radley"
Manns' reverse layup against Mur-
ray State could be filed away in the
"Happy Birthday" drawer. Plus,
they looked poor against UCSB and
luckily, for the Spartans, the Gau-
chos looked worse.
And to hell with rooting for the
Big Ten in the tourney; we're
talking State here. Thanks to State,
one of my two remaining Final
Four teams, Georgia Tech, ad-
vanced. A heart-wrenching, unfair,
last second, overtime Michigan
State tournament loss combined
with a team advancing in my popl
- it doesn't get much better than that.
UNLV still remains alive and I picked them to
win it all. Loyola-Marymount stood in my way for
the second straight week. Thus, it was the pool vs.
Hank Gathers. The ultimate confrontation. Greed and
callousness or Winning One for the Gipper in its
purest form. For whom did I root?
The pool. The tournament. What a sporting event.

4
i
i
b

*1by the Associated Press
OAKLAND - UNLV outraced
sentimental favorite Loyola Mary-
mount for a spot in the Final Four
on Sunday, getting 24 first-half
points from Stacey Augmon in a
131-101 victory that ended the
Lions' remarkable run in the NCAA
tournament.
UNLV (33-5) scored its most
.'points of the season and held the
* nation's highest-scoring team well
under its 124-point average. The
Runnin' Rebels sprinted out of reach
for good by reeling off 13 straight

points late in the first half of the
West Regional final.
Augmon, one of four Rebels
with at least 20 points, finished with
33. Anderson Hunt had 30, Greg An-
thony 21 and Larry Johnson 20.
The victory sends the Rebels into
their third Final Four, against
Southeast region champion Georgia
Tech next weekend in Denver.
Loyola, meanwhile, headed home
a winner in its mission to honor the
memory of Hank Gathers, who
collapsed in a game and died March
4. The Lions won three emotional

victories in advancing the furthest
ever in the tournament.
Bo Kimble, the nation's top
scorer, had 42 points before leaving
to a thunderous ovation from the
Oakland Coliseum crowd with a
minute left.
But he couldn't do it alone, and
the Lions couldn't overcome the loss
of Gathers, last year's No. 1 scorer.
Jeff Fryer scored 21 points for
Loyola. A 49 percent shooter from
3-point rage in the tourney, he was
only 1-for-9 on the long shots in the
first half.

'Lethal 3' helps Georgia Tech reach first Final Four

NEW ORLEANS - Dennis
Scott, Kenny Anderson and Brian
Oliver scored all but four of Georgia
Tech's points Sunday as the Yellow
Jackets beat Minnesota 93-91 in the
Southeast Regional final and earned
their first trip to the Final Four.
Scott scored 40 points, Anderson
30 and Oliver 19 to give the Atlantic
toast Conference its second team in
the Final Four at Denver next
weekend.
Georgia Tech (28-6) will meet
UNLV on Saturday in one of the
national semifinal games.
Duke, the East Regional cham-
pion and the other ACC team still
live in the tournament, will meet
"Arkansas, the Midwest Regional
champion in the other semifinal.
Sixth-seeded Minnesota (23-9)
was the last of a record seven Big
Ten in the field of 64, but the
Golden Gophers fell short in their
first appearance in the round of
eight.

Minnesota had a chance to win
but Kevin Lynch's 3-point attempt
from the side missed at the buzzer.
Georgia Tech, the region's fourth
seed, took the lead for good at 84-83
with 3:50 to play on two free throws
by Oliver.
Scott added two free throws 15
seconds later.
Lynch made one free throw for
Minnesota before Anderson hit a 3-
pointer with 2:55 left and Georgia
Tech led 89-84. Anderson kept the
Yellow Jackets alive Friday with a
disputed jumper at the buzzer to
force Michigan State into overtime.
Willie Burton, who led the Gol-
den Gophers with 35 points, hit a 3-
pointer to get Minnesota within two
with 2:19 left.
Oliver was called for an offensive
foul to give Minnesota the ball back
with 58 seconds to play.
Lynch was fouled with 35 sec-
onds to play and made just one.
Oliver made two free throws with

31 seconds left and Anderson made
two more for a 93-88 lead with 20
seconds left.
Burton's 3-pointer with eight sec-
onds left gave Minnesota one more
chance and Anderson missed the
front end of a one-and-one with six
seconds to play, but Lynch missed
the final shot of his and Minnesota's
season.

GET IT!
The Personal Column
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