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March 26, 1990 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-26

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Sports Monday - March 26, 1990
Michigan Sports
Calendar
A compilation of Michigan sporting events and
information for the coming week.
Monday, March 26
No events scheduled
Tuesday, March 27
Baseball at Bowling Green, 3:00 p.m.
Wednesday, March 28
Baseball vs. Western Michigan, 3:00 p.m.
Thursday, March 29
Men's Tennis Blue/Gray Championships, Montgomery, Al.
Friday, March 30
Men's Tennis Blue/Gray Championships, Montgomery, Al.
Softball in the Ohio State Tournament at Columbus, Oh.
Women's Tennis at Iowa, 2:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 31
Softball in the Ohio State Tournament at Columbus, Oh.
Men's Tennis Blue/Gray Championships, Montgomery, Al.
Women's Track in N.C. State Invitational at Raleigh, N.C.
Baseball at Indiana (Doubleheader), 1:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 1
Men's Tennis Blue/Gray Championships, Montgomery, Al.
Women's Tennis at Minnesota, 9:00 a.m.
Baseball at Indiana (Doubleheader), 1:00 p.m
Cycling Team in Michigan Criterium Bicycle Race, Runway
Plaza, just south of 1-94 on State St., 12:30 p.m.
IM Fraternity Top 2
Here's a look at total points
after the track relays event
Fraternity (Letters) Points Previous

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by Dan Zoch Michigan State and
Daily Sports Writer also set new highs
Illinois ran away with the Big Ten competition was stun
women's gymnastics championships Friday After Friday ni
night. Michigan finished sixth out of seven. Fighting Illini were c
But they could have done better, their bright-orange s
Michigan did improve over their last-place Saturday's individu
finish from the year before, and that was one nounced. The Wolve
of the team's major goals this year. It's not nast for each event.
that Michigan performed poorly Friday night The high point o
- far from it. The Wolverines scored their tition was watching
highest all-around score of the season. Their bie Geiger take a bro
finish really should come as no surprise, beam. It was nice to
though, because they've been ranked sixth in thing so positive ou
the conference all season- them the night befo
Michigan was doing great until the last see a rookie like G(
event, the balance beam. The team placed first dence booster for h
on the vault, third on the uneven bars, and competition.
third on the floor exercise. Overall, they were
in fourth place. On the floor exe
In gymnastics, a team has to accept five Lundbeck did a gre
out of six scores. This means one gymnast missed a medal bec
can mess up and the team can still post a competition.
good score. Michigan messed up four times, In the classical s
dropped the worst, and had to accept three year for the Wolve
scores under a 9.0. That's a pretty bad with a new coach, a
showing. They finished the event dead last, year gymnasts. Coa
by far, and dropped from fourth place to sixth. reins of a program ft
At the top of the heap, Illinois racked up 1982, their only ch
the highest all-around total score ever in a Big they've never even
Ten tournament. For that matter, second-place spots.
'I - I
4
JUUE HOLLMAN/Dai
First-year standout Debbie Geiger leads the way for Michigan in
Saturday's competition, earning a bronze medal on the beam.

Women gymnasts
fall off the beam

third-place Minnesota
in the Big Ten. The
n-ning.
ght was over, and the
rowned champions in all
plendor, the finalists for
al competition were an-
rines qualified one gym-
f the individual compe-
first-year gymnast Deb-
nze medal on the balance
see Michigan get some-
t of an event that killed
re. It was even nicer to
eiger earn such a confi-
her next three years of
ercise, sophomore Laura
at job on her routine, but
ause of some outstanding
ense, this is a rebuilding
rines. They had to deal
new arena, and nine first-
ch Beverly Fry took the
hat hasn't done well since
ampionship. Since then,
placed in the top three

Now they have the Varsity Arena, a
beautiful building refurbished with the finest
equipment and a nifty scoreboard. It's even
adorned with ads from Coca-Cola and Chrys-
ler, a sure sign that the team is in tune with
the future.
The Wolverines have nine first-year gym-
nasts and three sophomores. They only have
four out-going seniors. Four of the first-year
gymnasts, led by Geiger, have already had one
fine season and, with three years of expe-
rience, should be phenomenal by the time
they're seniors.
Sixth place isn't to be overjoyed about.
But it's not something to be torn apart by,
either. Illinois owned that tournament Friday
night, and they had seven medal-winners
Saturday. Minnesota has been on top for
years, but they're falling. Michigan State had
a fine performance and deserved their second-
place finish.
Maybe Michigan should have come in
fourth. If they wouldn't have choked on the
balance beam, they would have. But what's
the difference? We're seeing a team on it's
way up in the standings and in three years,
maybe two, when they'll be competing for
the gold medal, who's going to care whether
they came in fourth or sixth place three years
ago?

4

1. Sigma Phi Epsilon (10E)
2. Delta Tau Delta (ATA)
3. Sigma Nu (EN)
4. Alpha Epsilon Pi (AE H)
5. Evans Scholars
6. Alpha Tau Omega (AT)
7. Alpha Delta Phi (AA(D)
8. Sigma Alpha Mu (EAM)
9. Beta Theta Pi (B8H)
10. Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI)
11. Delta Sigma Phi (AD<D)
12. Chi Phi (X(D)
13. Phi Kappa Psi ((DKT)
14. Zeta Beta Tau (ZBT)
15. Phi Delta Theta (tAe)
16. Kappa Sigma (KE)
17. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (XAE)
18. Phi Kappa Tau ((DKT)
19. Triangle
20. Pi Kappa Phi (HK<D)

1230.3
1133.6
1079.8
1074.2
1055.7
1051.5
1035.5
1001
965.8
893.1
883.8
826
788.4
787.7
764.7
734.2
648
596.5
560.5
551.8

GYMNASTS
Continued from page 1
The uneven bars, not always a
strong event for the Wolverines,
came next. The team turned in
what was definitely its best perfor-
mance of the season. The lowest
counting score was a 9.25. Eva
Gordon had the routine of her life,
scoring a 9.65 and earning a place
in the finals competition.
Entering their last event,
balance beam, the Wolverines
were in a close race for fourth
place. However, balance beam has
been a rough spot for the Wolver-
ines in the last few meets.
"We had our best meet of the
season on three out of four events.
It was bad having beam as our last
event because we know it is not
our best event," coach Fry
explained. "We know what we
have to do to beat these teams, and
it just adds a lot of pressure. Kids
can handle pressure on floor and
on vault, but beam is a tough
event to handle pressure on. There
is a lot of wide open space and not
very much balance beam under-
neath you."
Thus, the Wolverine's low
score on this event placed them
last in the beam competition.
Debbie Geiger was the sole Wol-
verine to stick her beam routine.
She scored a 9.4, enough to give
her a spot in the finals.

The first day of competition
also served as a qualifier for the
finals competition on Saturday
with the top eight scorers advan-
cing. Michigan qualified one gym-
nast in each event.
Diane Armento was the lone
competitor for the Wolverines on
the vault. Armento performed the
same vault as the previous day and
received the same score, 9.5. This
was the fourth highest score of the
finals.
The next event was the uneven
bars. Gordon wasn't able to repeat
her 9.65 performance as she suf-
fered a fall on a release move.
Debbie Geiger, the Wolverine
beam qualifier, turned in a very
solid performance to score a 9.5.
This score earned her a third place
tie.
"I've been working all season
hard on beam, and it is nice to see
that it paid off," Geiger com-
mented.
Laura Lundbeck did her usual
great floor routine and scored a
9.6. Though this was her season
best, coach Fry was a bit disap-
pointed..
"I thought that she (Lundbeck)
had one of the top three floor
routines, and I don't think that she
got what she deserved," Fry said.
"It's kind of a let down because
Laura is a beautiful floor worker."

Sports Monday
Senior Editors
Andy Gottesman
David Hyman
Night Editor
Phil Green
Matt Rennie
Assistant Night Editors
Tom Kent
Photo Editor
Jose Juarez
Answer to Sports Monday Trivia
Sandy Koufax and Spud Chandler

HILL
Continued from page 1
"He was like an assistant coach
in the gym... he just had a sense a-
bout gymnastics that was uncanny,
and on top of that he had a way of
communicating that to the other
kids," Greening said.
"He's just a leader, a natural
leader without a big rah rah thing.
He led by doing, not by telling, yet
he was always open to help, to tell
the kids whatever he could tell them
when they asked him."
Hill arrived at Michigan and soon
established himself as the team's
best pommel horse performer.
Most gymnasts have more
trouble with the horse than any other
event, and Darden suggested that this
may be because of the horizontal
movement involved in the horse as
opposed to the vertical rotation used
in other events.

But for Hill, the explanation is
simpler. "I learn a lot faster on
pommel horse than I do on anything
else...I pick up tricks more easily.
And I like it a lot."
Greening calls Hill a natural on
the horse. "He had balance and
control, even before he was' high
school age, that most kids never
achieved."
This season, Hill is once again
Michigan's top athlete on horse. He
is also one of the best in the country
as his No. 7 national ranking attests.
Darden says Hill's horse routine
"bleeds difficulty."
His other events are also im-
proving. Earlier in the year, he was
ranked. eighth nationally on floor
exercise, and while he may not be
highly ranked anymore, he is an
important member of the floor team.
"We know we can count on him
to establish a base score," Darden
said. "We do this to start on a real

positive foot. It's great to have
somebody go up there and hit. II
makes the job of the next guy a
little bit easier."
Hill is currently in a down stage
of his season. After steadily in-
creasing scores through a meet at
Navy, which included a career high
9.70 on horse, Hill hit the Big Ten
Championships. Although he posted
a 9.50 on horse, it was only good
enough for 11th place.
In the next meet, perhaps venting
frustration and disappointment, he
came back strong with a 9.60 on
horse, and a 9.0 average on his other
two events. But since then his horse
routine has suffered, with a 9.20 and
an 8.55 in the last two meets.
Hill feels that a lack of practice
time has hindered him.
"With all the meets in between
spring break, we've just been pack-
ing in (and travelling), not hav-

ing...all the time I need to train for
my horse routine," he said. "And
consequently it got worse."
But Darden feels that Hill has
what it will take to regain his past
success.
"He's really making a name for
himself because he does cover the
very fine points of competing. He:
has a feel for the judges, he has a
feel for the event, and he knows how
to perform not only for himself and
for his team, but to the crowd asa
well."
With this past weekend free from;
competition, Hill has had plenty of
time to concentrate on training. And
he is confident that he will return to
form, enabling him to begin a
strong drive towards the NCAA
Championships next month.
"It'll all come together before
(this) weekend."

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