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March 12, 1990 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-12

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A dog's day in Detroit

The Michigan Daily- Monday, March 12,1990 - Page 3
Gov't prepares
for first count
of the homeless

WASHINGTON (AP) - An
army of federal workers is about to
participate in the first census of the
homeless.
The occasion is the first census
of the homeless.
How many are there? Where do
they live? What kind of help do they
need?
To many of the homeless, being
counted seems likely to make little
difference in their lives.
"I don't see nothing I stand to
lose or gain," said Spencer Cox, a
homeless New Yorker. "It's just use-
less. What's the point?"
A homeless man in Stamford,
Conn. echoed Cox's view. "What
good could it do?" said the man,
who would identify himself only as
Bob.
Estimates of the number of
homeless nationwide have ranged
from 250,000 to 3 million in recent
years.
Counting them - a task some
consider impossible - will be at-
tempted on the nights of March 20-
21, less than two weeks before the
Census Bureau's official counting
day for the rest of the nation.
"It's the first time we've gone
out in the street," said Cynthia
Taeuber, who is directing the effort.
Advocates for the homeless, local
governments and other organizations
have been enlisted to help, and most
are cooperating, she said.
In some cases that assistance is
being given "grudgingly" however,

since the groups have concerns about
whether there will be a complete and
accurate count.
"The Bush people are not into
taking care of people who need
help," said Karl Kirman, contacted at
the Columbus House shelter in New
Haven, Conn. "And they don't want
to know why we need help." But
Kirman said he would answer the
census questions anyway.
Simone Baxter, of Hartford,
Conn., who said she has been home-
less for four months, believes it is
important to be counted.
"I don't think the government re-
alizes how many homeless people
there are," she said.
William Barrios, who lives in a
shelter for veterans in New York said
people in shelters will be coopera-
tive. "They get a census every night
when they check in," he said.
"The homeless people on the
streets, they're not going to cooper-
ate. They're druggies and alcoholics
looking for their next fix," Barrios
added.
In Washington, Mitch Snyder of
the Center for Creative Non-Vio-
lence is urging the homeless to snub
the Census Bureau.
"You can't count all the people
in the streets. Experience quickly
teaches the homeless that to be iden-
tified as such is to risk harassment...
and abuse," Snyder said.
In Detroit, Toylce Cheatham is
worried about talking to government
officials, even though the Census
Bureau promises to keep the answers
secret.

More than 5,000 people attended the 72nd Annual Detroit Dog
Show held in Cobo Hall, yesterday. Above: Kathie Duguid and
her Border Collie Jesse compete in the Grand Prix jumping
event . Jesse placed second in the event. Right: Sugarrests
after qualifying in the Grand Prix jumping competition.
Below: A beagle has his whiskers trimmed.
Photos by Josd Juarez

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:.:Graduating? Moving out of the Dorm
GIs Your House Too Cluttered?
;;Making Room for Tew Things?
.-IEWE us "YOUR (CIE ANC1E-v
.Enterthe MARKET
BUY and SELL EXCESS FURNITURE!!!!!
-The SWAPSHOP Section Of The Classifieds-
Televisions
Y Stereos 4tiel e S
.V .. V'
Vacuums Tables Desks

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Dense fog to give way to sunny skies

by The Associated Press
A crazy quilt of late-winter
F'eather descended over Michigan
yesterday, including rain, snow, clear
skies and warm air that created thick,
damp fog in spots and threatened to
unleash flooding across the Lower
Peninsula.
Moist, warm air flowing over
still-cold ground and snow left over
from February blizzards generated
fog across the south central and
southeastern Lower Peninsula, slow-
*'ng motorists and playing havoc
with air travel.
The fog lifted earlier yesterday in

the southwestern Lower Peninsula.
Light rain fell during the afternoon
across parts of northern lower
Michigan and much of the Upper
Peninsula.
Snow was reported near Manis-
tique in the south central Upper
Peninsula. -In Copper Harbor at the
tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula and
at Harbor Beach at the tip of the
Thumb, skies were dry and visibility
was unlimited.
Visibility was reduced to one-six-
teenth of a mile, about 110 yards, at
Detroit Metropolitan Airport and
Oakland-Pontiac Airport, officials

said.
"We have delays and possible di-
versions for the rest of the night due
to fog," said a spokesperson for
Northwest Airlines, which accounts
for 63 percent of all commercial traf-
fic at Metro.
Metro remained open yesterday
evening, but numerous flights were
delayed or diverted, spokesperson
Mike Conway said.
"There's very, very few arrivals at
this point," he said. "for the most
part. (Airlines) are leaving the planes
on the ground in their origination ci-
ties, rather than head for Detroit and
have to get diverted, say, to Cleve-
land."
With afternoon temperatures

climbing to as high as 72 degrees in
Battle Creek, the National Weather
Service issued flood warnings for the
Saginaw and Muskegon rivers and
their tributaries.
Flooding was expected by tomor-
row on the Chippewa River at
Mount Pleasant, the Pine River at
Alma, the Shiawassee River at
Owosso and the Flint River at Flint.
The Tittabassee River at Midland
was expected to overflow its banks
Wednesday, followed Thursday by
the Saginaw River at Saginaw.
Additional flooding of those and
other rivers was possible because
high temperatures were expected to
reach the mid-60s to mid-70s this
week in southern Lower Michigan.

WtTHE LIST
'What's happening in Ann Arbor today

TFgd
@tt6in

Meetings
UM Taekwondo Club -
beginners welcome 7-8:30 p.m.
2275 CCRB
UM Shorin-Ryu Karate-do
,Club -beginners welcome 7:30-
'8:30 p.m. in the CCRB small
'gym
Asian American Association -
general meeting and sexuality
workshop at 7 p.m. in the Trotter
House
Student Initiative --- meeting
to discuss activity on campus at 7
p.m. in the Union Crofoot Room
Student Coalition for Student
Awareness --- meeting at 8 p.m.
:in the Education Center (1522
;Hill behind Luther Cooperative)
Speakers

Hamza speaks at 4 p.m. in Room
100 Hutchins Hall
Furthermore
Free Tutoring - for all lower
level science and engineering
courses; 8-10 p.m. in UGLi Rm.
307
Safewalk - the night-time safety
walking service is available from
8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. in UGLi Rm.
102 or call 936-1000
Northwalk - the north-campus
night-time walking service is
available from 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.
in Bursley 2333 or call 763-
WALK
ECB Peer Writing Tutors -
peer writing tutors available for
help on papers 7-11 p.m. in the
Angell/Haven and Church St.
computing centers

Food BysL
" i
TRY US FOR LUNCH!
Pizza, Subs and Salads
Eat-in or Carry Out
FREE DELIVERY!
(11 a.m.-2 p.m.)
Corner of State and Hill
994-4040
NOW OPEN
I
Located in the Michigan Union
530 S. State Street - 662-6169

CARRY

FREE

OUT
MAIN CAMPUS
665-6005

DELIVERY
NORTH CAMPUS
995-9101

Small Deep Dish
with Cheese
and Choice of
1 Topping.

Medium Round Pizza
with Cheese
and Choice of
2 Items.
(Approx. 12")

I

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