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March 12, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 12,1990
Greyhound
expands small
city service

DALLAS (AP) - Gunshots
fired at a bus run by strike-beset
Greyhound Lines Inc. in Florida
injured eight people %yesterday, a
company spokesperson said.
Two people were seriously hurt
and six others, possibly hit by
flying glass, suffered less serious
injuries, said George Gravlev,
spokeperson at Greyhound's Dallas
headquarters.
Greyhound Lines Inc. said buses
were again running yesterday to 120
communities that hadn't been served
since drivers walked off their jobs at
the only nationwide bus line.
The company was able to add
routes to spots in the Southeast and
Southwest yesterday after a new
class of drivers graduated from train-
ing courses, said Greyhound
spokesperson Elizabeth Hale.
On Saturday, Greyhound carried
38 percent of the number of passen-
gers it did on the same Saturday a

year ago and operated one-third of the
number of departing buses, Hale
said. Figures for yesterday would re-
flect the larger number of routes, but
were unavailable until today, she
said.
The 120 communities had been
without service since the Amalga-
mated Council of Greyhound Local
Unions - which represents 6,300
drivers and more than 3,000 office
and maintenance workers - went on
strike March 2.
Officials at the union's headquar-
ters in Phoenix, and at offices in
Dallas and Washington, D.C. didn't
respond to telephone calls yesterday.
Big cities have been served by
Greyhound virtually since the strike
began. The additions yesterday in-
cluded smaller cities and small towns
along routes between metropolitan
areas, Ms. Hale said.

AP Photo

Ed Scribner, president of the Metro Detroit AFL-CIO, addresses a group
of Greyhound strikers outside a Greyhound terminal on W. Lafayette in
Detroit.

I

Sperm ba
NEW YORK (AP) - The sperm
bank accused in an alleged racial
mix-up faces a separate lawsuit by a
couple alleging it threw away the
sperm from a man about to undergo
treatment for testicular cancer, ac-
cording to a published report.
Idant Laboratories was sued by
Gasper and Catherine Mastrobuoni
last year after the sperm was thrown
out because of a billing mix-up, the
Daily News reported in yesterday's
editions.
"I was devastated when I found
RANKS
Continued from Page 1
ness, medical and engineering
schools question the reliability of
the poll, saying it is subjective and
is not based on scientific data.
"There are some different ones
(schools) ahead of us whom we
think we're better than," said Gilbert
Whitaker, Dean of Business Admin-
istration. "The ratings are not very
scientific."
Joseph Johnson, dean of the Med-
ical School, said "We're happy to be
number 13," but also agreed that
"(T)hese ratings are full of variables
and even if we were number one, it'd
have to be taken with a grain of
salt."
Johnson added that the Medical
Schools' evaluation was "less valid"
than the business, law, or engineer-
ing schools because the Association
of American Medical Colleges voted
down participation in the poll.
"Many medical school deans
across the country did not partici-
pate," Johnson said.
"There is some question about its
reliability," Johnson added. "It is not
an official poll."
For this year's poll, Market Facts
Inc. of Washington, D.C. consulted
"thousands of academic and profes-
sional authorities to determine how
the experts on and off campus per-
ceive a given institution" in the win-
ter of 1989-90, the magazine said.
The survey also ranks individual
departments within colleges.
The Univeristy 's nuclear engi-
neering department receives the
highest ranking of any of the Uni-
versity's departments, at number two
in the nation. The Industrial engi-
neering department places third and
the aerospace, electrical, and envi-
ronmental engineering departments
are all ranked fifth.

nk faces an additional lawsuit

out they destroyed my husband's
sperm," Mrs. Mastrobuoni told the
News. "It was our only chance for
having a child."
Idant is accused in another law-
suit filed last week of providing the
wrong semen to a white woman who
later bore a Black child. The
woman's husband, also white, had
his sperm stored before undergoing
chemotherapy for cancer.
Idant has denied fault in that case.
The News said it was unable to
reach company officials for comment

on the Mastrobuoni claim. A call
placed by The Associated Press to
Idant's answering service Saturday
night wasn't returned.
When Mastrobuoni's cancer was
discovered, a Veteran's Administra-
tion hospital referred him to Idant,
the News said. He agreed to pay the
bank $200 and it stored some of his
semen in January 1985, before he
started radiation treatment.
When the couple didn't hear from
Idant, they called and learned the
husband's sperm had been discarded

because the lab had only received a
$20 payment from the Veterans Ad-
ministration.
"We never received any type of
billing," Mrs. Mastrobuoni told the
News. The newspaper said it could
not reach Veterans Administration
officials for comment.
Mastrobuoni's cancer has been
cured but an attorney for the couple,
Joseph Filiardi, said "it's very un-
likely his sperm count is high
enough to effectuate conception."

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Israel may demand war
damages of united Germany
WEST BERLIN - Israel is entitled to and may demand reparations
for the Holocaust from a united Germany, the Israeli ambassador to West
Germany said in an interview released yesterday.
"I can't rule out that Israel will demand reparations at some point,"
Benjamin Navon, a Holocaust survivors, told the mass-circulation daily
Bild in an interview to be published today.
A 1950's reparations agreement with West Germany "spells out ex-
plicitly that we are entitled to do so in the case of German unity," the
ambassador said. The interview was released in advance of publication to
other media.
West Germany has paid $44 billion in reparations to Israel and Jewish
Holocaust survivors around the world under the agreement. By the end of
this decade, payments are expected to reach $55.5 billion.
Study finds flaws with Mich.
tuition pre-payment program
LANSING, Mich. - Michigan's pre-paid college tuition
guarantee program rests on questionable economic assumptions and pro-
vides a flawed answer to the rising cost of higher education, a new study
says.
However, State Treasurer Robert Bowman blasted the Mackinac Center
report due to be released today, describing it as "so fallacious it has to be
deliberate."
The study said the Michigan Education Trust (MET) is too optimistic
about the average annual tuition increase - 7.3 percent - and will need
to more than double its return on its investments to meet its
commitments.
Bowman said the MET investments have to earn an after-tax return of
about eight percent and need a nine percent pre-tax return to do that.
In his study, college professor Peter Boettke said that from 1978 to
1987 tuition at Michigan's 15 public universities increased at an average
annual rate of 8.9 percent and went up 10.2 percent in 1988 and 9.1 per-
cent last year.
Gov't reviews espionage laws
WASHINGTON - A panel of Washington insiders armed with
top-secret security clearances is conducting a major, unannounced review
of the nation's espionage laws in a search for better ways to catch and
convict spies.
Recruited from the private sector by the leaders of the Senate
Intelligence Committee, the panel members have visited the CIA, FBI,
Pentagon and National Security Agency, among others, over the last nine
months.
CIA Director William Webster, FBI Director William sessions and
Attorney General Dick Thornburgh all have met with members of the
group, according to executive branch sources.
FBI and CIA spokespersons confirm their agencies have offered
information and suggestions, but won't describe them. A Justice source
says the department has yet to offer either formal or informal advice.
Many of the panel members already had security clearances from
service in past administrations. But sources, who spoke only on condition
of anonymity, said others received new or updated clearances especially for
this project.
Robbers plague Columbus
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Brash and sometimes bumbling criminals have
staged a rash of bank robberies in Ohio's capital city and its suburbs.
The Columbus area, with a population of about 1.2 million has had
42 bank robberies this year, more than Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh, and
Cleveland combined.
Authorities suspect many of the robbers are down-and-out drug addicts
looking for quick cash.
That theory was borne out with the arrest Friday of a man who admit-
ted to robbing eight banks since Feb. 7, claiming he used the money to
support a $900-a-day crack habit.
There have been 21 arrests in the 42 robberies. All of the defendants
are awaitiig trial.
One man was arrested while counting his booty in his getaway vehicle
- a city bus - March 5 after he allegedly robbed the same Bank One
branch for the third time in a week. Police charged him in six bank heists.
Smokers lose sense of smell
PHILADELPHIA - A smoker's sense of smell recedes with
every passing puff, according to researchers at the University of Pennsyl-
vania who conducted scratch and sniff tests.
"The majority still have a sense of smell, but not as acute as if they
weren't smoking," said Richard Doty, director of the university's Smell
and Taste Center.

Both current and former smokers lose their ability to smell all kinds of
odors in proportion to the amount of cigarettes and length of time they
had smoked, the researchers reported yesterday in the Journal of the
American Medical Association.
Current smokers are nearly twice as likely to show a loss of smell
than those who never smoked, according to researchers.
The loss appears to be reversible, Doty said, but two-pack-a-day smok-
ers would have to quit for as many years as they smoked to regain the
essential sense, he said.
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 in-town and $39 out-of-town, for fall only $18.00 in-town and $22.00 out-of-town.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
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0

Calvin and Hobbes

DOic N. I MAN, DOES
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Nuts and Bolts
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I

Artistry&ommunity
At Mannes they go together. The skills, understanding and
originality of artistry are fostered by a superb faculty in a caring and
supportive community. That's why Mannes graduates succeed.
U
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II
U

Editor in Chief Noah Finkel it itrw I~ r (Al~
Managing Editor Kristine LaLonde Associate Spats Editors Steve Cohen, Mdy Gottesman,
News Editors Karen Akedo, Marion Davis, Davd Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Opinion Page Editor David SchwartzGru Vera Sngwe Arts Editors Alyssa Katz, Krtsin Pakn
Issues Editor Laura Sankey BooJ an Ly~ii Brn dad
Weekend Editors iMiguel Cruz, imJnek.Wn ded
Kevinoen MaorisForest Green 111
Photo Editors Jose Juarez, DavidThaterJay ekal
Ust Editor Todd Dale
News: Josephine Ballenger, Joana Broder, Diane Cod, Heater Fee, Jennifer irs, Ian Hoffman, Mark Katz, Chrisine Kloostra, Rulh
Utinam, Emily Miller, Josh Minik, Dan Poux, Amy Quikd, Gil Renberg, Mke Sobel, Michael Sulivan Nose Vance, Elsabeth
Weinstein, Donna Woodwei.
Opinion: Mark Bucha, Yaei Citro, Ian Gray, Stephen Henderson, Aaron Robnson, Tony Siber, David Sood.
Sports: Eric Berkmnan, Mliael Bess, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Jeni Durst, Richard Eisen, Jared Enti, Scott Erskine, Stewe
Fraiberg, PhiGreen, Lory Knapp, Albert in, John Niyo, ii Ory, Sarah Osbum, Matt Rennie, Jonathan Samnick, Ryan Schreiber, Jeff
Shoran, Peter Zellen, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Greg Baise, Sherril L Bennett, Mark Binelli, Kenneti Chow, Lynne Cohn, Beth Colquitt, Sharon Grimberg,9dan Jarvinen, Scott
Kirkwood, Mike Kuniavsky, Ami Mehta, Mike Molitor, Amene Petrusso, Jay Pinka, Mnio Roque, fyse Sdianz, Wendy Shanker,
Peter Shapiro, Rona Sheramy, Mark Swartz, Jusine Unain, Phlp Washington, Mark Webster, Mim Yaged, Nabeel 2ubed.
Photo: Sarah Baker, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Julie HdIman, Jonathan Uss, Josh Moore, Samanha Sanders, Kenneh Smnier,
Steven Szuch.
Weekend: Phi Cohen, Rob Earle, Donna ladipado, Alex Gordon, Nana Trachaman, Fred Zir.

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