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February 26, 1990 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-02-26

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 26, 1990 - Page 3
1U

Minority lounge is rededicated

by Geri Alumit
+ Members of the Markley Minor-
ity Affairs Council, and Markley
minority peer advisors rededicated the
Angela Davis Lounge - a minority
student lounge in Markley - in
'honor of Black History Month and
before planned renovations of the
lounge.
The Housing Division allocated
1$23,000 to refurbish the lounge, and
the renovations should be completed
9:peaker
by Gwen Shaffer
Author and photojournalist Jean-
Marie Simon pointed to Guatemala's
widespread human rights violations,
in contrast to the country's stunning
beauty, in a lecture at Rackham
Amphitheater Friday night.
Simon is a consultant to
Amnesty International and Americas
:Watch, for whom she is writing a
:report on Guatemala, and is author
of Guatemala: Eternal Spring,
Eternal Tyranny, a photographic es-

in November.
Several members of the Housing
Division staff and Markley residents
attended the event. Director of Hous-
ing Information Leroy Williams -
Markley Building Director when the
lounge was first dedicated in 1974 -
spoke at the rededication.
"Not only was it appropriate in
1974 to name this lounge after An-
gela Davis, but it is important today
because she represents not only the

history of the struggle of Black
women, but of all third world peo-
ple," Williams said.
The lounge was created in 1974
due to the efforts of Black students
who wanted a minority student
lounge to house Markley's Minority
Affairs Council.
"This is an all purpose lounge,
there are meetings here, but it is ba-
sically used as a studying and recre-
ational room," said Angela Rencher,

president of the Markley Minority
Affairs Council and LSA first-year
student.
Davis, born January 26, 1944 in
Birmingham Alabama, was one of
the foremost Black activists of the
Civil Rights Movement. Today she
is a published author and a declared
Communist, and teaches Black Phi-
losophy and Women's Studies at
San Francisco State College in Cali-
fornia.

focuses on human rights

say depicting the living conditions
in Guatemala.
Simon said tens of thousands of
people have been killed in
Guatemala in the last decade. She de-
scribed a morgue she photographed
in 1980 where "there were so many
bodies on the floor there was no
place to step."
Simon said government-organized
civil patrols attempt to cut off sup-
port for the guerrillas. "Basically,
any man capable of holding a gun is

recruited," said Simon. "Controllers
are told to turn in anyone suspected
of collaborating with the guerrillas,
pitting brother against brother," she
explained.
Although participation in the pa-
trols is voluntary according to
Gautemalan law, Simon said men
are actually forced to serve.
Simon said the guerrilla move-
ment never really posed a threat to
the Guatemalan government and
Guatemalan men only join the guer-
rillas when "their options are one of

three things: death, living in exile,
or joining the guerillas."
Though some students said they
wished Simon had spoken more on
U.S. relations with Guatemala, Julie
Kirchgatter, first-year LSA student,
said, "Simon gave me a better under-
standing of the problems in
Guatemala."
Women for Guatemala, a group
which supports Guatemalan widows,
was the primary sponsor of the lec-
ture.

Police blame blizzard for auto accidents

Associated Press
The coldest air since late Decem-
ber swept across the state yesterday
as cities and rural areas alike recov-
ered from blizzard-like conditions
blamed for hundreds of traffic acci-
dents and at least one death the day
before.

The low was 3 degrees yesterday
morning in Detroit and was expected
to sink below the zero mark yester-
day night, the National Weather Ser-
vice said. It was the coldest day since
Dec. 27 when the low was 9.
"We've had the coldest single
readings since the last part of De-

cember," said rmeteorologist Bill
Deedler of the weather service's De-
troit office. "The normal low for this
time of the year is in the 20s."
The arctic chill followed blowing
snow and icy road conditions Satur-
day that were to blame for a flood of

accidents and some freeway closings.
A pileup on interstate 94 in Ber-
rien County led to the death of a
Grand Rapids woman. Dawn Warsaw
was struck about 11 a.m. Saturday
in the freeway's westbound lane,
state police at the New Buffalo post
said.

In honor of...
Nationally renowned poet Gwendolyn Brooks read her poetry Friday
evening in the Rackham Auditorium as part of a celebration to honor
Robert Hayden. Hayden, a native of Detroit, was a graduate and teaching
assistant at the University of Michigan. The three-day conference
honoring Hayden featured poetry readings by University professors and
poets from across the country. More than 400 people attended the
conference.

Comprehensive Studies Program reaches to students

by Julie Foster
First in a four-part series
LSA senior Selena Brown may
-be from Detroit, Michigan, but she
'calls the Comprehensive Studies
:Program, her home away from
home. "You get to know everyone,
:and we all work together just like a
family," she said.
CSP formed in 1983 to provide
minority students with intensive
class instruction, personal counsel-
ing, tutorial services, a mentorship
aprogram, and internships. As it was
designed, the program became a
;composite of two earlier minority
support organizations: The Opportu-
nity Program and The Coalition for
the Use of Learning Skills.
While CSP is open to all stu-
dents, 90 percent of its approxi-

mately 1,400 participants are minor-
ity students.
The program focuses its outreach
and recruiting toward minority stu-
dents, said CSP counselor Gus Pap-
pas.
The admissions office counselors
will place a student in CSP if they
feel the student will benefit from
CSP's programs, Pappas said. Any
LSA student can apply for CSP ad-
mission, but one does not have to
apply to be placed in the program.
To apply students fill out a ques-
tionnaire and a personal data sheet;
then, the student is assigned a coun-
selor.
No student has ever been denied
acceptance to the program. But be-
cause of it's growing popularity
Pappas said: "We're pretay much at

our limit now."
CSP provides intensive courses
in biology, chemistry, mathematics,
English, Spanish, and French. Stu-
dents in CSP sections are required to
spend an extra one to two hours in
class each week.
"CSP sections allow you to meet
more times a week, which some-
times can be tedious, but you spend
more time, have more practice, and
perform better," Brown said.
CSP also offers individual and
group tutorial services for over 200
students enrolled in a number of
courses.
Another feature of CSP is its
counseling services. Each CSP stu-
dent is assigned one counselor and
ECHjGAN
RECORDS*

remains with that counselor
throughout his or her college years,
meeting several times during the
year. Along with academic concerns,
CSP counselors discuss personal
concerns with the students ranging
from family problems to roommate
conflicts.
Students do not have to take CSP
courses to receive the counseling.
"I'm Puerto Rican. I don't have
my parents. I had never seen snow
before I came here. So I feel the
counseling program is very helpful.
I just come for counseling," said
Juan Arce, an LSA senior.
Terrence Brown, associate director

of CSP counseling, said he feels the
personal approach is more beneficial
to students than general LSA coun-
seling, "If you know a student, you
have a good sense of what their tal-
ents are and can find the best way to
assist them."
If a student-counselor relationship
doesn't work for some reason, the
student is free to switch counselors.
"We are really here to serve the stu-
dents. So if one counselor works
better (for the student) we will make
the switch," said Brown.
The CSP lounge is open
throughout the day for students to sit
over coffee and talk with other stu-

dents, and counselors are available
all day long.
"I think the majority of the stu-
dent population could benefit from
our program if they're willing to put
in the time and work a little bit
harder than they would under a nor-
mal situation," said Dr. Ralph
Story, associate director for CSP
administration.
CSP has many students willing
to put in the extra effort. Mitchell
Adler, an LSA junior currently ap-
plying for CSP, stated, "There's so
many benefits that this program of-
fers, why in the world doesn't ev-
eryone take advantage of it?"

CORRECTIONS
Alpha Phi Alpha, the Angell Club and Alpha Phi Omega sponsored the Red
Cross Blood Drive held earlier this month.
The Daily incorrectly reported this information.
WhTHE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

RECORDS
1140 SOUTH UNIVERSI
-Directly above Good Time Chark
PH: 663-5800

9:00 P.M.-1:00 A.M.
TONIGHT ONLY
TY STORE HOURS:
ey'S MON-SAT: 9 AM-10 PM
SUN: 11 AM-8 PM

599
"Just say

ON
COMPACT
DISC ONLY!
YES"

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4
P
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s
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r
i
s
t
4
1
1
t
M
1
i
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e
1
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a
0
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1
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a
a

Meetings
UM Taekwondo Club -
beginners welcome 7-8:30 p.m.
2275 CCRB
UM Shorin-Ryu Karate-do
Club - beginners welcome 7:30-
8:30 p.m. in the CCRB small
.gym
Asian American Association -
general meeting and sexuality
workshop at 7 p.m. in the Trotter
House
Student Initiative --- meeting
to discuss activity on campus at 7
p.m. in the Union Crofoot Room
Speakers
"People of Color in the
Military: What Could Have
Been Done to Improve their
Situation?" --- 3 Tuskegee
airmen and a Korean War P.O.W.
will share experiences at 7 p.m. in
Angell Hall Auditorium B
"Analyzing Games and Puzzles
with Measures" --- Professor
Hochster will speak at 4 p.m. for
the Undergraduate Math Club in
3201 Angell Hall
"Controlling Metaphors: The
Sun, the River, and 'The Third
Bank of the River' by Joao
Guimaraes Rosa" --- Enylton de
sa Rego speaks at 5 p.m. in the

"Diastereotopic Groups, a
Starting Point for
Stereoselective Bond
Formation" --- Reinhard W.
Hoffman speaks at 2 p.m. in
Room 1640 of the Chemistry
Bldg.
Furthermore
Free Tutoring - for all lower
level science and engineering
courses; 8-10 p.m. in UGLi Rm.
307
Safewalk - the night-time safety
walking service is available from
8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. in UGLi Rm.
102 or call 936-1000
Northwalk - the north-campus
night-time walking service is
available from 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.
in Bursley 2333 or call 763-
WALK
ECB Peer Writing Tutors -
peer writing tutors available for
help on papers 7-11 p.m. in the
Angell/Haven and Church St.
computing centers
Career Planning and
Placement - sharpening your
interview skills 4:10-5 p.m. in
CP&P Room 1
Anthropology Career Night --
with John Ford at 7 p.m. in
LS&A Room 2040C
Voter Registration Drive ---
registration takes place at both
Stockwell and South Quad

"Just say NO"
"Just say MAO"
a various alternative artist
sampler CD, including
Depeche Mode, Erasure,
K.D. Lang, and many more.

LhP5ts$like T i"F-5

CASSETTE

CASSE[TE

4.99-
8.99

ON
CASSETTE!
ON
COMPACT
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$99On
cassette!

$99on
compact
disc!

Limit one per title, per customer
They Might be Giants
Flood
Everything but the Girl
Language of Love
Welcome to the
Beautiful South (formerly
the Housemartins)
Ocean Blue
Technotronic
Pump Up the Jam
Michael Penn-March
Peter Murphy-Deep

The
Housemartins
"London 0,
Hull 4"

LED ZEPPELIN
LED ZEPPELIN

Peter Gabriel
(includes
Solsburv Hill)

r--1

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