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February 23, 1990 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-02-23

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 23, 1990 - Page-3

I

State may give aid

4

for
by Christine Klo
Daily Government V

student service

.

" a

aostra
Writer

Students at Michigan's colleges
and universities will be eligible to
receive financial aid for community
service if a bill passes the state leg-
islature.
The bill, which was proposed to
the state legislature two weeks ago
by Rep. Lynn Jondahl (D-Okemos),
would expand the state work-study
program to include payment for vol-
unteer work in specified programs in
non-profit or government agencies.
"This program will allow stu-
dents to become involved in public
service opportunities and to receive
work-study wages as part of their fi-
nancial aid package," said Jondahl.
However, Carolyn Nuber, coordi-
nator of the University's work-study
program, said the bill probably
won't have a large impact here.
"It doesn't look like it's going to
make a difference unless it opens up
a whole new area," Nuber said,
pointing out that students at the
University can currently hold jobs at
off-campus non-profit organizations
(such as the Ecology Center) that of-
fer work-study positions.
The state bill, currently in the
House Colleges and Universities

Committee, would pay students no
less than minimum wage for com-
munity service work that does not
involve religious training or wor-
ship. Students are also prohibited
from receiving wages for work on
political campaigns.
Students participating in the pro-
gram must be residents of Michigan,
maintain good grades and demon-
strate financial need.
The bill also includes a program
for students who are not receiving
aid from the work-study program but
participate in community service ac-
tivities. These students would be re-
imbursed for their expenses, includ-
ing cost of travel, uniforms, and
necessary equipment, said Penny
Crawley, chair of the Michigan Col-
legiate Coalition, a lobbying group
representing students in the state's
15 public universities.
Reaction to the bill has been pos-
itive so far, Crawley said. Fifteen
co-sponsors from the Democratic and
Republican parties joined Jondahl in
supporting the proposal.
The proposal was made in re-
sponse to several financial aid bills

brought up on the federal level.
"There's been a great deal of talk
of eliminating all federal finanpiil
aid and requiring students to dotwo
years of community service before
entering college," Crawley said.
.Crawley said bills, such as The
Kennedy National Service Act,
would hurt the economically disad-
vantaged as well as students withde-
pendents.
The Kennedy National Service
Act, sponsored by Sen. Edward
Kennedy (D-Mass.), would offer
part-time or full-time work in com-
munity service for a two-year period
in exchange for financial aid.
Under the National Service Act,
low-income students would have to
delay college for two years to finance,
their education, and students with
children would be forced to support a
family on a poverty-level income or
find an additional job, Crawley said.
Participants would receive $950
a year towards college educationor a
down payment on a home. In addi-
tion, participants would be paid
wages above the poverty level but
not above minimum wage.

Indoor protest
Michael Young leads a protest to promote free elections in Nicaragua. The protest was originally intended for
the Diag, but the recent outburst of seasonal weather forced the protesters indoors.
Program committee to
research global changes

by Catherine Fugate
Global warming. Holes in the
ozone. Overflowing garbage dumps.
Burning rainforests.
In response to these problems and
other environmental concerns, some
University faculty members have
formed "The Interdisciplinary Pro-
gram on the Study of Global
Change."
The program committee plans to
conduct research, sponsor seminars,
bring guest speakers to campus, and
develop a new curriculum - possi-
bly creating classes focused on the
study of global change.
"Our aim is to predict the conse-
quences of human activity on the
geosphere-biosphere system and the
environmental changes that will re-
sult," said William Kuhn, professor
of atmospheric science. "We also
want to identify the changes in hu-
man behavior that could contribute
to more effective earth management
and develop effective intervention
measures.

Project Director Thomas Don-
ahue, professor of planetary science
and professor of physics, said the
project had humble beginnings. Last
spring, he and a few administrators
"discovered a lot of (University) ac-
tivity on this subject that no one
was aware of." Donahue was refer-
ring to the amount of widespread in-
terest and research being conducted
on environmental issues.
A $250,000 grant from the Uni-
versity's Presidential Initiatives
fund, as well as $65,000 from the
Office of the Vice-President for Re-
search, will provide the needed fund-
ing for the project.
The project will combine the ex-
pertise of scientists from a wide
range of disciplines.
"We intend to use that expertise
to examine every aspect of global
change from physical changes in the
biosphere to understanding how hu-

man behavior threatening the envi-
ronment can be modified," Donahue
said. "We hope to achieve a form of
guidance for policy makers in the
government and for industry."
"We're interested not only in
studying global change, but in doing
something about it," said Gayl Ness,
a professor of sociology and profes-
sor of population planning and in-
ternational health. Ness will direct
the project's study of population-en-
vironment interactions. He said an-
other goal of the project is to create
a healthy relationship between the
population and the environment.
"Times of global change bring
forth both winners and losers," said
William Drake, a professor of re-
source planning and conservation.
"We hope to find ways to capitalize
on the positive aspects of each
change."
The committee will present re-
search proposals next week.

Pursell will not take action

e
.
k
uw

"
against B
WASHINGTON (AP) - Repre-
sentative Carl Pursell will not take
action against his 1986 re-election
foe, who helped fabricate a letter that
distorts the Michigan Republican's
view toward violence in El Salvador,
an aide said yesterday.
"Apparently there's not a lot we
can do," said Gary Cates, spokesper-
son for Pursell, who had referred the
matter to the Postal Service and the
FBI. "There was no solicitation for
money, so it didn't constitute mail
fraud."
Dean Baker, a longtime critic of
Pursell on Central American issues,
said the fake letter was intended to

aker for fa
goad him into seriously discussing
the region. It had a reproduction of
Pursell's letterhead and carried what
appeared to be his signature.
"I would be delighted if we lived
in a country where we have serious
debates on these issues," Baker said
Wednesday night in a telephone in-

terview from Lewisburg, Pennsyfvi-
nia, where he is an assistant eco-
nomics professor at Bucknell Iuni-
versity.
"But the last campaign was spent
talking about Willie Horton and the
flag," he said. "The rules are rigged
and I have no problem violating
rigged rules."

ECONO-CA R

Program helps

'U'

'students find jobs,
in foreign countries

CORRECTIONS
The story "'U' abandons MSA inquiry" in yesterday's paper incorrectly
represented MSA President Aaron Williams. Williams asked the University
President Duderstadt to appeal the decision by the Central Student"Judiciary
to invalidate the results of the December MSA elections.
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L NNR O R :SOME EXCEPTIONS MAY APPLY)DAY TUESDAY'
Bring in this ad. for one FREE 12 oz. drink 9 expires 3/1/90

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by Michael Sullivan
You don't know a man until
you've walked ten miles in his moc-
casins and you don't know a country
until you've worked there.
The University's International
Center is sponsoring presentations
by the Council on International Edu-
cational Exchange (CIEE) on work-
abroad opportunities today and Mon-
day.
'It's a one of a kind program,'"
said Bill Nolting, the Center's Inter-
national Opportunities Coordinator.
"It is the only way to work legally,"
he said, noting that permits for U.S.
citizens to work in Europe are al-
most impossible to get and "with
Europe moving toward unification in
1992, the labor market will be even
tougher."
CIEE administers a program al-
lowing U.S. college students to
work up to six months abroad. Re-
ciprocal agreements with England,
Ireland, France, Germany, Australia,
New Zealand, Costa Rica and Ja-
maica allow those countries' stu-
dents to work in the U.S.
Students pay a $96 service fee to
CIEE for a work permit, support
programs that help students find a
job and a place to stay.
Annually more students from the
University participate in CIEE pro-

grams than from any other school in
the U.S., said Nolting. Last year
113 students participated.
"I suspect University students can
deal with this program because
they're independent, forceful and ag-
gressive," he said. "They're more
used to dealing with a large decen-
tralized bureaucracy than students
from a small liberal arts college."
The majority of CIEE students
work in clerical positions, restau-
rants and hotels. But about 25 per-
cent find "career-oriented" positions,
said Nolting. One student did re-
search for the British newsweekly
"The Economist" last summer.
"I got to experience what life in
France is like - more than a travel-
ling observer would," said Susan
Jekielek, an LSA sophomore who
worked in Paris last year.
Today Sarah Hirschhorn, from
CIEE's New York office, will be at
the International Center from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m., talking about programs in
France, Germany, Australia, New
Zealand, Costa Rica and Jamaica.
Monday, CIEE officials from
England and Ireland will give a pre-
sentation in the Union's Pendleton
Room at 3:30 p.m. Monday morn-
ing they will also set up an informa-
tion table in the Union basement.

- Rentals available to those 21 years of age and older
- Special weekend rates
" Pick-up services upon request
- We accept cash deposits
Rent a car from ECONO-CAR

Academy Awarid Nominations
BEST ACTOR
BEST DIRECTOR
BEST COSTUMES
HENIIY V*

Academy Award
5Nominatlons Includng
BEST PICTURE

BEST ACTOR

Life and
laughter.
MY'
LEFT
FOOT

438 W. Huron, Ann Arbor

761-8845

The University of Michigan Department of Recreational Sports
presents
SUMMER
SOFTBALL
I_____I _ NClassics
Adult
Slow-Pitch Leagues
Mass Meeting March 7-7:00 p.m.
Main Gym
Intramural Sports Building
606 E. Hoover

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"24 YEARS EXPERIENCE"

.mCHEF JAN
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
OF DETROIT COBO HALL NATIONAL CONTEST
Sponsored by Michigan Restaurant Association
Michigan Chefs De Cuisine Association
BLUE RIBBON BEST CHEF AWARD
IN WASHINGTON D.C.

% I

*Tanker explodes; 2
U.S. sailors killed

LUNCHEON SPECIAL, 11:30 A.M.-3 P.M.
- CHEF JAN HAD DEMONSTRATED HIS COOK-
ING ARTS ON CHINA TV STATION & WEI-
CHUAN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR 3 YEARS
- CHEF JAN ALSO COOKED PRESIDENT'S NA-
TIONAL BANQUET.
- CHEF JAN WAS INVITED TO DEMONSTRATE
HIS SPECIAL COOKING TECHNIQUES ON
CHANNEL 4 IN WASHINGTON D.C. ON THE
SUNDAY SHOW.

MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) - A
U.S. flag Kuwaiti tanker loaded with
naphtha and diesel fuel exploded
Thursday in the Persian Gulf and
two American crewmen were
believed killed.

sources said the two men missing,
and evidently killed, were the captain
and the first mate of the 81,283-ton
Surf City but further identification
would have to come from the
owners, the Kuwait Oil Co. No one

CHOICE
CHOICE
CHOICE

playing fields
location/lights/parking
umpires

CHOOSE CO REC C-Men's B, C, D

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