100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1990 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sharples on
way to record
SHARPLES
continued from page 1
Cornell to Michigan, Sharples would never have been
provided with the opportunity to attend Michigan.
"It was a difficult situation for us," Berenson said.
"Here we were in May and we didn't know what to do."
The Wolverines scouted Sharples in the beginning of
his senior year at Penticton Secondary High School in
British Columbia, but stopped following the prospect
in October. Provided with updated reports of Sharples'
play throughout the season, Michigan learned that he
was a real factor in his team's success.
Left in dire straits by the NCAA ruling, Michigan
resumed pursuing Sharples as the player between the
pipes. But because the Wolverines were counting on the
transfer, Sharples never made a recruiting visit to Ann
Arbor.
"I never saw the school, but Michigan said 'you'll
play,"' Sharples said. He then spoke with fellow
Calgarian Ryan Pardoski, who had already visited and
planned to attend Michigan the next year. "(Ryan) was
really impressed with the school and was an excellent
source for me."
Following his commitment to Michigan, Sharples
entered his school's library the next morning to locate
the state of Michigan. He did not even know how far
east Michigan was from his home in western Canada.
"It was the right thing to do for me," he said
referring to his decision to attend college.
Sharples decided to attend college instead of entering
the Major Junior League because he felt his hockey
career was not guaranteed. "I felt I needed the education
to fall back on. I also needed the four years to develop
emotionally and physically as a hockey player and
Michigan was a great chance," he said.
But finding a goalie was not Michigan's only
problem that year. While Sharples' high school team
had lost only 12 games his senior year, the Wolverines
soon gave him a taste of a losing team.
"My freshman year was very frustrating," the goalie

The Michigan Daily , Sports Monday -February 5, 1990- Page 7
with. He's very conscientious and organized and he took
a leadership role upon himself the first week we met."
And Sharples takes this leadership role into the
Michigan locker room as well. "Warren has a lot of
good things to say," Pardoski said. "When he talks,
*' people listen."
Berenson agrees. "When he's on his game, he's a
real leader. He's vulnerable when he's not playing well,
but he can make the difference."
Sharples, a ninth round selection by the Calgary
Flames in the 1986 NHL draft, looks toward entering
the ranks of professional hockey.
It was a thrill to be drafted by your home team," he
said. "I'd like to keep playing. All indications are there,
but once it (hockey) starts to run its course, I know I
can move on."
But before moving on from Ann Arbor, Sharples
would like to see his team reach the CCHA Finals and
the NCAA Tournament. He feels it would be tragic to

JULIt HOLLMAN/Daily
Goalie Warren Sharples and Defenseman Alex Roberts watch the puck go into the corner in this weekend's
game against Western Michigan. The Wolverines swept the Broncos by scores of 7-2 each night.

said. "I took a beating and it hurt my confidence. It was
such a dramatic turn-around since I was winning all the
time before I got here. I was hoping to have an
immediate impact."
Yet Sharples regained his confidence his sophomore
season, notching 18 of Michigan's 22 wins to earn the
team's MVP honor.
"When I first got here, my highs and lows went with
the team, but I've learned not to get caught up in the
past. I look to the present," he said.
Sharples, like many other students, also had to deal
with the transition from high school to college. "It was
a very difficult adjustment, both athletically and
scholastically," he said.
He learned quickly to juggle both, though, because
"as one starts to slip, the other will follow. If you don't
learn quickly, you'll probably have to give up one or

maybe both."
He has also learned not to get caught up in the game
of hockey itself. "When I'm away from hockey, I don't
dwell on my game. I want to balance out my life. I'd
much rather not talk about hockey when I see someone
on the street."
So Sharples focuses his attention on his studies and
his involvement in the student service group,
Michaguama. Comprised of seniors elected by the year's
previous members, Michaguama s 'rves the university
community in many ways.
"The school gives us a scholarship here and it's
(Warren's) way of paying back the community,"
teammate Pardoski said. "He isn't looking for anything
from it. He just helps out the community."
Michaguama member Chad Cohen, an LSA senior,
agrees: "He seems to care about the things he's involved

'What a waste not to get involved
in something. Why not make the
most of it.'
- Michigan goalie Warren Sharples
go four years without advancing that far and there is no
reason the team can not do it this year.
Even if the Wolverines do not advance to the
NCAA's, Sharples would not feel as if his four years at
Michigan were squandered. "It's been a great
opportunity to play here," he said. "I've enjoyed both
the academics and athletics here. It's been fun and a
challenge.
"It probably wasn't the most rational decision, but it
was the right decision," he added about his choice to
attend Michigan.
Since committing over the telephone, Sharples has
made the most of his four years, even if the location of
the state of Michigan was a big unknown.

-,

GE

T IT!
C"R p

The Pr rsonal Column
MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS
STUDY FOR ONE YEAR OR
FOR ONE OR TWO TERMS JI
OXFORD
Several colleges of Oxford University have invited The
Washington International Studies Council to recommend
qualified students to study for one year or for one or two
terms. Lower Junior status is required, and graduate study
is available. Students are directly enrolled in their colleges
and receive transcripts from their Oxford college; this is NOT
a program conducted by a U.S. College in Oxford. 3.2
minimum index in major required.
An alternative program which is sponsored by a U.S.
University is available for students with minimum indexes of
2.7. Students will have social and athletic rights in an Oxford
college and the fees are substantially less.
INTERN IN WASHINGTON, LONDON
WISC offers summer internships with Congress,. with the
White House, with the media and with think tanks.
Government and Journalism courses are taught by senior-
level government officials, who are also scholars, and by
experienced journalists. Similar opportunities in public
policy internships are offered (with academic credit) in
London (Fall, Spring and Summer).

w
The Taubman American Institutions
Internship Program Presents.. .
Ethics in the
Non-Profit Sector
Henry Berliner, Former President

I

Pennsylvania Avenue
Development Corporation
Tuesday, February 6, 1990
12 Noon - 1:00 PM
Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union
Public Welcome " Refreshments Served
For more information, call 763-2584

6

i
i
1
t
t
j
h
{

mmi

Am

The Washington
International Studies Council
214 Massachusetts Ave., N.E.
Suite 450
Washington, D.C. 20002
EO / AA (202) 547-3275

Don't Miss It!
The Last One Sale!
Marty's Menswear & His Lady Apparel have put together all the remaining
great fall and winter clothing from their fine men's and women's stores to give
you unbelievable bargains.
Marty's policy - Sell at sacrifice prices, rather than carry overmerchandise.

R'itfWI RESTAURANT
"24 YEARS EXPERIENCE"
CHEF JAN
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
OF DETROIT COBO HALL NATIONAL CONTEST
Sponsored by Michigan Restaurant Association
Michigan Chefs De Cuisine Association
BLUE RIBBON BEST CHEF AWARD
IN WASHINGTON D.C.
LUNCHEON SPECIAL, 11:30 A.M.-3 P.M.
" CHEF JAN HAD DEMONSTRATED HIS COOK-
ING ARTS ON CHINA TV STATION & WEI-
CHUAN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR 3 YEARS
" CHEF JAN ALSO COOKED PRESIDENT'S NA-
TIONAL BANQUET.
- CHEF JAN WAS INVITED TO DEMONSTRATE
HIS SPECIAL COOKING TECHNIQUES ON
CHANNEL 4 IN WASHINGTON D.C. ON THE
SUNDAY SHOW.

PARSONS
SCHOOL OF DESIGN
Special Summer Programs
Parsons in Paris June 30-August 13
Paint on the Left Bank, explore prehistoric caves in the Dordogne, visit the
masterpieces of renaissance art in Tuscany. Courses include painting, drawing,
art history and the liberal arts. Students may choose to spend the last two
weeks of the program in the Dordogne or Cortona, Italy.
Photography in Paris June 30-July 30
Study both the aesthetics and the craft of photography in the city that has in-
spired great photographers for 150 years. Guest lecturers and visits to Parisian
galleries supplement the curriculum.
Fashion in Paris June 30-July 30
Study the history and contemporary trends of French fashion design through
visits to Parisian museums and costume collections. Guest lecturers and visits
to design studios and retail outlets are part of the program, as are daily classes
in fashion illustration.
History of Architecture and Decorative Arts in Paris June 30-July 30
Offered in collaboration with the renowned Muse des Arts Dcoratifs, this pro-
gram focuses on the history of French architecture and European decorative
arts. Excursions to points outside of Paris are included; last summer, students
visited Versailles, Vaux le Vicomte and.Fontainebleau.
Modern Paris June 30-July 30
Combining architectural history with drawing, this programfocuses on the
development of Paris in the modern period (1830 to the present).
Paleolithic Art and Archaeology of the Dordogne July 29-August 13
Daily class sessions near the town of Les Eyzies de Tayac, in southwestern
France are devoted to lectures and guided visits to the areas famous and less
well-known prehistoric caves, living sites and archaeological excavations.
History of Architecture in Italy July 13-August 11
The architectural heritage of Italy is studied in Rome, Florence and Venice,
where on-site presentations are made by Parsons faculty.
History of Architecture and Decorative Arts in Great Britain
July 10-August 10
This four-week curriculum, covering the years 1600-1900, is offered in London,
with several excursions to nearby towns and country houses.
Graphic Design in Japan July 16-August 14
Design students and professionals will discover the excitement of Japanese
advertising and graphic design through workshops, seminars and presenta-
tions by internationally known designers. Studio, museum and gallery visits
supplement the curriculum, which emphasizes the sources, in the traditional
arts, of much contemporary Japanese design.
Parsons in Israel July 23-August 19
Offered in collaboration with Jerusalem's Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design,
the program provides an in-depth introduction to major sites of historical impor-
tance, to the rudiments of archaeological practice and to techniques of artistic
representation.
Parsons in West Africa July 2-August 1 and August 4-August 25
Workshops in ceramics and fibers will introduce students to artists and artisans
in several Ivory Coast villages, where these crafts can be studied in their
original context. A photography curriculum examines techniques of documen-
tation and reportage in regions of great natural beauty and cultural diversity.
The history of African art and architecture also is offered. Additional study in
Mali may be taken as a separate option, or as a continuation of the Ivory Coast
program.
All programs include round trip airfare, accommodations and land transfers.
Academic credit is available to qualified students. For more information, please
return the coupon or call:
(212) 741-8975
Parsons School of Design
Office of Special Programs
66 Fifth Avenue, N.Y., N.Y. 10011
Please send information about:

Ladies'
Dresses to $149
JUST $4
Ladies'
Blazers to'$169
JUST $9

Ladies'
Suits to $350
JUST $149
Ladies'
Sweaters to'66
JUST $29
l.adies'
Blouses to $59
JUST $1

Men's
Suits to $250
JUST $99
Men's
Sportcoats to $150
JUST $59
Men's
Sweaters to s50
JUST $1'995

I

Ladles'
Skirts to $89
JUST $29

Lades'.
Slacks to '59
Aa .

. +

_

Ladies'
Cotton Tops
imn/ -

Men's
Slacks to $75
4AmA

0 Parsons in Paris
r, ,. . _ _- _ .

Ql
LI

Paleolithic Art
Architecture in Italy

II

it

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan