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October 30, 1989 - Image 28

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-30
Note:
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.

A Akk i

YU. THE NATIONAL COLGE NEWSPAPERC1O

Comment an ILon OCTOBER 1989

OCTOBER 198Ilars and Sense

U. THE NATIC&L. COLLEGE NEWS

Prof explains how to eliminate name gai

THE NATIONAL COLLEGE
NEWSPAPER
By presenting a ide range of opinions and ideas reprinted
from hundreds of campus newspapers, we hope to enhance
the quality of campus life as we inform, entertain and
engage the national student body. We acknowledge the com-
mitment of student journalists across the nation, supported
by their media advisers and journalism professors, to report
the activities, issues and concerns of their fellow students
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER
Sheena Paterson-Berwick
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
George F. Taylor
Special Projects, Mark Charnock
EDITORS ON FELLOWSHIP
Charles A. Hahn, Northeastern News, Northeastern U.
Jacki Hampton, The Breeze, James Madison U.
Kathleen Kobernik, Western Herald, Western Michigan U.
Hector P. Vargas Jr., The Red and Black, U. of Georgia
CAMPUS RELATIONS DIRECTOR
Dick Sublette
EDITORIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
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Copyright 1989. Alrights reserved.

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JAKE TAPPER, THE DARTMOUTH, DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
questionsco age
followAing campus tragedy
By Diana L. Meredith the story tr to sanitize that? Also, w
The Daily compete withCbroadcast news, andthey':
U. of Washington probably have rolling film showin

-0

By Jacqueline Crymes
The Purdue Exponent
Purdue U.
Remembering names is rarely easy, and it can be
especially difficult for students on a large campus. But
according to one Purdue professor, anyone can dra-
matically improve their recall of names with just a lit-
tle effort.
Mark McDaniel, an associate professor of psycho-
logical sciences who specializes in memory, says that
everyone is guilty of forgetting a name at one time
or another.

"When you are introduced to someone, you have
other concerns, such as making a good impression
and wondering, 'What I am going to say?' While you
hear the name, you aren't attending toit sufficiently."
In order to improve memory, McDaniel suggests,
one must pay more attention to names and less to
social concerns.
After meeting someone, repeat the person's name
out loud, he says. This forces one to focus on the person
without allowing other thoughts to interfere.
Associating names with faces can also help.
Learning names one-on-one may not be a problem,
but in a group it often becomes difficult. In these sit-

uations, McDaniel suggests creating a lin
person and name by "taking a cue from
physical appearance."
"Say I have a student named Judy and v
met her, she wasn't smiling. I might think
moody. I'd remember her name because
with Judy. This method really works," he
Another example McDaniel gives is
Purdue science professor--whose name h
recall - who makes an effort to remembe
students' names. "He takes pictures of hi
and associates ... the pictures and names i
book."

Money
Continued from page 16
I recently heard an announcement for
a 1969 class reunion that made me won-
der what American college students
were like 20 years ago, when I was still
slurping down strained carrots and
enjoying it.
I thought of a passionate era, almost
too passionate and revolutionary. But a
decade that cared. It seems light years
away from today's somewhat conserva-
tive and utilitarian tendencies. Has the
passion and fire of the'60s and early'70s
been quenched?
Some say there are no more "causes"

worth fighting for with such vigor.
Others argue thatthe causes arein dis-
tant countries or social groups, and don't
directly affect the average American cit-
izen.
It might be that our senses have been
numbed -or perhaps dazzled is a better
word - by the dehumanizing lure of
money, power and indulgence.
I met a guy Saturday night whose goal
in life was to be a millionaire by the age
of 35.
His major is International Trade and
Finance, not because he thinks it will be
an exciting and rewarding career, but
because he will make loads of cash.
I wonder if he even knows what's
involved in that type of work - but I

don't think he cares as long as it makes
him rich. He even said he had no problem
doing illegal things to make his money.
He said he wanted to be a millionaire
because once you have money, every-
thing else falls in place -or so he thinks.
The only "thing" he included in "every-
thing" was power.
"What more could you need?" he asked.
I hope this is an extreme situation, but
the point is this poor guy didn't consider
the fact that a woman could easily marry
him in search of her MRS. degree and for
his money. Or that "friends" could also
use him for his money, and that everyone
could fear him for his power.
He got real excited at the thought of
people fearing him, but what fun is life

Dirty laundry ... Three Bosi
dent entrepreneurs have c
Laundry Exchange so tha
can avoid the hassle of d
own laundry. The busines
Boston U. and Simmons
picks up, cleans, irons an
clothing within 24 hour
laundromat does the cle
Laundry Exchange
Alexandre Speaker. The
has a fixed rate of $11 fo:
laundry as students can
one bag. Penelope Jev
Daily Free Press, Boston I

E

e
11
g

r

The following excerpt is from a col-
umn written by the editor-in-chief of
The Daily of the U. of Washington the
morning after a female UW student and
a Seattle man were shot to death in a
campus parking lot.
This is my sixth attempt at writing this
commentary
Yesterday, sev-
eral reporters,
photographers
and I dealt with
many questions
after two people
were shot on cam-
pus.
I wanted to write
a thoughtful essay
on the dilemmas
that a newspaper
staff, especially _
this one, faces
when covering a JOE FORKAN, ARIZONA
homicide. I can't
seem to put my "How do you cov
thoughts together I was at the scen
cohesively. ed to get the sto
The following is want to interfer
an approximation
of everything that
went through my mind yesterday.
Should I run a picture of the body?
Should we run a picture at all? Where
are my photographers? Oh, someone got
recruited. Two guys have never met us
Daily folk but offered to help us out.
No, we're not going to run a picture of
the body. I'm sorry you wasted a roll of
film taking pictures of the body, but it's
considered in poor taste to run things
like that. Or is it poor taste? Won't it
make the story more dramatic and com-
pelling? This shooting really was a
tragedy. Should the visual elements of

everything.
Damn, there's another person on the
phone wanting to know what happened.
Everyone who knows someone who
works here is calling to find out what's
going on. The Seattle bureau of the
Associated Press called here to find out
the names of the victims.

It's here .

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ver a homicide?
ne, and I want-
ry, but I did not
re...."

I A
. 11 .

interview this par-
ticular witness on
camera. After the witness repeatedly
refused to appear on camera, the
reporter informed her that "this is a real-
ly big story."
This is a really big story. Yes, this is a
really big story, and I must admit that I
was relieved to have something to put on
the front page.
But as reporters we must not lose
sight of what we deal with - tragedy,
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