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October 30, 1989 - Image 26

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-30
Note:
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6 1. THE NATIONAL COLA E NEWSPAPER -0 4F

V $ OCTOBER 1989

OCTOBER 1989 r rdent Body 1989

i19

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U. THE NATIONI COLLEGE NEWSF

6W.. THE NATIONAL COLL~E NEWSPAPER U. 'S * OCTOBER 1989

Students, faculty join forces to attract Olympic
Georgia Tech facilities would be built, revamped at no charge to univ<

Healthy, spiritual and free... The Hare
Krishnas have cooked free, vegetarian
lunches for U. of Florida students since
1971. All they ask in return is a small
donation that averages about 23 cents a
lunch. "I eat the food because it's free and
good, and I'm usually hungry at this
time of the day," said one UF alumnus
who has eaten the meals since 1978. The
Krishnas serve about 150 to 200 lunches
a day on campus and all the food is
offered to God before being served to
humans, Krishna Cook Govinda
Parayana Dasa said. "Food not offered
to God only fills your belly and your sex-
ual desires increase," Dasa said.
"Spiritual food fills your belly and also
purifies." Omar Fakhourg, a theater
major, said the lunches have changed his
life. He now is a vegetarian and plans to
join the Krishnas after graduation. "At
first I thought they were brainwashed,
then you realize they're sanitized," he
said. "When you order a hamburger from
Burger King, it's like paying for a hitman
to kill an animal for you." Rob Stevens,
The Independent Florida Alligator, U. of
Florida

current POWs and MIAs, estimates
Admissions Office Director Marc Borish.
The law, approved by Oklahoma Gov.
Henry Bellmon in June, replaces 1973
legislation that offered tuition-free high-
er education to the dependents, if the
POW or MIA had not returned to the
United States. Linda Kay Sakelaris,
The Oklahoma Daily, U. of Oklahoma.

an A and the thought crossed my mind
to give them a zero," he said. "On one
hand, I'm sympathetic. On the other
hand, I cannot not give grades." The
exam represents about 36 percent of the
class grade, Cleaver said. Later, Cleaver
said the boycotters could compile read-
ing packets and deliver a presentation
to make up for the missed exam. Diana
Williams, The Daily Texan, U. of Texas,
Austin

Students walk out of econ test... Nine U.
of Texas, Austin students refused to take
an upper-division economics test
because they believed grading systems
do not indicate the amount a student has
learned about the subject material.
Homero Lucero, a senior, said he and the
other students boycotted theirexam
because the class taught them to view
society critically. "The point of the class
is to look around at the institutions and
analyze them critically before making a
stand," Lucero said. "Since kinder-
garten, we've had academic hoops placed
before us and were told to jump. This
time, we took our own way and went
around them." Harry Cleaver, the pro-
fessor teaching the course, said the boy-
cott occurred after one student
addressed the class, ripped his test in
half and urged classmates to leave. "The
thought crossed my mind to give them

Amnesty granted... More than 105 stu-
dents showed up on Parking Amnesty
Day last winter semester to pay reduced
fines for parking tickets issued by the
West Virginia U. Department of Public
Safety Originally planned for two days,
the number of students that showed up
to pay their fines encouraged U-DPS to
add two days. Some students com-
plained about DPS being disorganized.
"What is taking time is several people
don't have their tickets, and we have to
take time to research and find them. It's
pretty tough to be organized when you've
got that many people," said Bobby
Roberts, interim director of DPS.
Roberts said it was hard for DPS to esti-
mate how many people would show up
to pay the reduced fine. * Sean Chadwell,
Daily Athenaeum, West Virginia U.

Mainstreaming athletes ... U. of
Miami faculty are advocating
mainstream housing for student
athletes, but the athletes appear to
prefer separate apartments.
During a spring meeting, UM stu-
dent government leaders and fac-
ulty discussed requiring athletes to
live in dorms. Connie Nickel, assis-
tant events manager of the athletic
department, said she opposes the
plan. "They can learn from upper-
classmen by living with them," she
said. SG Senator Max Adams said,
"If athletes want to live with other
athletes, they have that right."
Suzanne Trutie, Miami Hurricane,
U. of Miami
U..
Couple trade books for world bike trip
... When Dave Cranman finishes-
dthe requirements for a bachelor's
degree from U. of Georgia last
spring, he and his wife Christine
plan to bicycle around the world.
"We've, thought about trains and
cars, but you can't really see much
like that. You're always thinking
of objectives, of hurrying up and
getting there, wherever there is,"
he said. They planned to start in
Savannah, and ride between 30 to
100 miles a day to Quebec before
taking a plane or boat to
Greenland. From there they'll go
to Europe. Chris Clonts, The Red
and Black, U. of Georgia

Students of Georgia Institute of
Technology are working to make the univer-
sity and the city of Atlanta the most attrac-
tive bid for host city of the 1996 Summer t
Olympics.
The bid would bring new facilities to the
campus, which would serve as the Olympic
Village for the event.
Atlanta, along with Manchester, Great
Britain; Melbourne, Australia; Toronto,
Canada; Belgrade, Yugoslavia; and Athens,
Greece, is being considered for the bid by the
International Olympic Committee, which
will make its decision in 1990.
Ray Moore, a member of the Atlanta
Organizing Committee Board of Directors,
is working with various schools of engineer-
ing to produce a presentation that would
give a tour of Atlanta's Olympic venues.L
Students are considering programs to
advertise Tech, such as a mock Olympic competition between
the Greeks of Georgia Tech and of U. of Georgia.
The Student Coalition for the 1996 Summer Olympics, a
group organized to coordinate the pre-selection activities, also
intends to hold a luncheon with members of the administration
to establish contact between students and faculty.
Faculty adviser to the Coalition Mike Furman said students
will play a major role in the Atlanta bid process and that Tech
students were the first to respond with an organization of such
magnitude.
"If years from now one ofour students should make millions
and decide to donate a million to Tech, their impact on the

71.

By Leslie Lissimore
and Darren Stradder
. The Technique
Georgia Institute of Technology

A

improvements at Tech will not
impact of their actions today if
to secure the Olympics for Atlar
Furman said he hoped more in
al students would get invoh
Olympics is an international effo
need an international emphasis
to finish in order to best exen
Olympic spirit before the IOC
Atlanta."
Furman has been organizing
vating students to help campaig
Olympics. "I was a Tech student, a
how Tech students feel," he said
about the pride they take in th
and their creative spirit.
"I felt that to leave students
mistake. Thus far, it has been
organized and well documented.
AOC has been surprised and ex
what the students have manage(
In an article written forBusine
April 1989, AOC member Patric
stated Georgia Tech would reap p
benefits if chosen to be an Oly
Atlanta has all the infrastructure, the stadiums, th
the airport... All the physical tools.
"Some existing structures may be used for training
petition, but many buildings will be constructed. W
the present stadium for field hockey, the Coli
wrestling, and the new pool for practice," Crecine s;
"We'll construct at least an additional 2,000 roomsc
pus housing within the next two to three years ... Ne
centers will be erected and general improvements ar
pus will be made, all funded by the IOC. The beauty
is, all these facilities will be ours to keep after the
leave."

JASON MUNROE, ARGONAUT, U. OF IDAHO

U. of Idaho junior Karen Sheldon practices pole.
climbing for the Logger Sports Competition
hosted by the UI Forestry, Wildlife and Range
Science students.

Con man at work . . . Posing as a
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
transfer student down on his luck, a con
artist was arrested after he wormed his
way into living in Techwood Residence
Hall for about two weeks, then vanished
with approximately $2,000 and a com-
puter. A Tech resident invited "Otis
Jackson," as he was known, to move into
his dorm room after his previous room-
mate left the country. He became suspi-
cious when he returned to his room one
afternoon and discovered his computer
and television missing. Jackson
explained to another student as he
walked down the hall with the goods that
he had lost his key and did not want the
items stolen. Jackson threatened the
roommate when confronted about the
belongings and the police were called.
Jackson has been arrested four times,
twice on Tech's campus. Stacey
Herdlein, The Technique, Georgia
Institute of Technology

Chapel, gallows scene snare comments ...
Several members of the Duke U. com-
munity were upset that a scene from the
film "The Handmaid's Tale," which
included a woman being hanged, was
filmed in front of the university's chapel.
Minister to the University William
Willimon said, "Duke Chapel is a sacred
place to many of us, and the scene going
on seems to be kind of a violation of that
sacredness." Assistant Minister to the
University Nancy Feree-Clark said that
because the quadrangle in front of the
chapel is university property, the chapel
staff had no input in the decision to film
the gallows scene there. After Willimon
read the script he maintained that he
preferred the university not place the
gallows scene in front of the chapel, but
decided not to hinder the university's
decision. Shannon Smith, The
Chronicle, Duke U.
...
Students arrested for false IDs ... Eleven
Duke U. students were arrested in
March for fabricating 44 false Florida
driver's licenses, a Durham County, N.C.
police officer said. The students took pic-
tures of minors and pasted them over
photographs on legitimate Florida
licenses then photographed the docu-
ments and laminated the photographs,
said Chief of Alcohol Beverage Control
Stephen O'Brien. Although it has not
been established if money was
exchanged for the licenses, students in
Pegram Dormitory were making the
documents for themselves and other
dorm residents, O'Brien said. Crystal
Bernstein, The Daily Tar Heel, U. of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill

on%

1 2 3 4 5 6
S 2 13
15 16
CORONA
CrOSSWord 26 27 28 29
Challenge 32
34 5
ACROSSy7

Breast reduction operations stop discomfort

x
39

1. Hourly salary
5. Prescription-
drug agency: Abbr.
8. Historical
periods
12. Mideast nation
13. AuihorDeighton
14. Adaiowledg the
cwd
15. Wear well
i6. Doctors' trade
group: Abbr.
17. 'Jeopardy!"
host Trebek
1. Smith corona
product
21. Actress _
Dawn Chong
22. Finals week,
for many
26. Miler's asset
29. "__Yankee
Doodle Dandy": 2
wds.
30. Feel bad about
31. Fill the van
32. Make a remark

33. Join the chorus
34. Incoming air-
plane
35. Soft metal
36. Track-team
contests
37. Faraway friend
you write to: 2 wds.
39. Ted Danson's
"Cheers" role
40. Smith Coronas
50,000 word elec-
tronic dictionary: 2
wds.
45. Tennis pro
Mandlikova
48. Originally
named
49. Close by
50. Someone you
admire
5i. Middling grade
52. Opera solo
53. College quarters
54. Sixth sense:
Abbr.
55. Depend (on)

i4
1. Basketball great
chamberlain
2. Like -_of sun-
shine: 2 wds.
3. Sound of surpris
4. Started college
5. Emergency signs
6. Actress Moore
7. Pre-med course
8. Scholarship, for
instance
9. Guy's date
10. Eden dweller
. _, ies and vide
tape."
19. Big bankroll

1
48
51
54
DOWN
20. Pitcher'sstatistic:
Abbr.
23.A Great Lake
24. Dad-s sis
e 25. Chair parts
26. Rude one's
al "reward"
27. _ over (study
closeley)
28. Make money
29. Author Fleming
32. Library necessity
33. Advance-study
o- class
35. On _ (how some
beer is served)

36. Damage
38. Sacred song
39. Hit the hay
41. Actors Majors and
Grant
42. "An Officer and a
Gentleman" star
43. Signal a cab
44. cafeteria prop
45. Concealed
46. "Without further__
47. Neither's partner

Klan secretly visits campus.. Ku Klux Klan
members accepted a secret invitation
from a professor to speak last spring at
State U. of New York, Binghamton.
Permission for them to speak on campus
had been denied twice by the campus
radio station's student board of directors
because of security costs. Professor
Richard Hofferbert did not tell adminis-
tors or his students that Klan members
would speak, but said students had indi-
cated interest earlier in hearing them.
Andrea Hyman, a student in the class
said the visit was worthwhile. "It was a
good forum and most students were glad
for an oportunity to listen," she said.
Hofferbert criticized colleagues and
administration for lack of support. "Not
one administrator or faculty member has
appeared in ... defense of Jeffersonian
principles."m Eric Anderson, Pipe Dream,
State U. of New York, Binghamton.

By Debra Goldstein
The Daily Orange
Syracuse U.
The following names have been
changed to protect identities.
Curvacious bombshells
Marilyn Monroe and Dolly
Parton made them notorious.
Sales of padded bras and silicone
injections soared. But along came
the likes of Twiggy, and every-
thing changed. Sorry, guys; the
age of bodacious ta-tas is over.
With the recent surge in plastic
surgery technology, reduction
mammoplasty, or breast reduc-
tion operations, are becoming
more common. Despite what
many think, breast reductions
are done for mainly medical pur-
poses rather than cosmetic ones,
plastic surgeon Dr. Alfred E.
Falcone said.
Brooke, a junior, had her
breasts reduced during
Christmas break her sophomore
year to alleviate the constant
backaches she suffered.
"What a lot of people don't real-
ize is that they (large breasts) are
uncomfortable," she said. "Plus, I
hated the way it looked. My chest
made me appear much heavier
than I was. I got to a point where
I was miserable."
Backaches are only one harm-
ful effect of overly large breasts,

according to Falcone. Neck-
strains, rashes in the breast folds
and painful creases on the tops of
the womens' shoulders caused by
stiff bra straps are also common.
Falcone added women with
large breasts are restricted from
many athletic activities.
"Even running to answer the
phone was painful," Brooke said.
Jill, a sophomore who had her
breasts reduced while still in
"It sounds so stupid to
think your chest size can
change your life, but it
does"
high school, also suffered from
chronic backaches, but her
biggest complaint was not being
able to wear what she liked.
Jill decided to have the surgery
done during February of her
senior year.
Brooke and Jill are only two of
the many women their age who
have had breast reductions.
Falcone said most of his patients
are either in their early 20s or
post-childbearing years (around
42 years old).
The American Society of
Plastic and Reconstructive
Surgery Journal gave the follow-
ing age breakdown of women
having reductions: under 18, 9

percent; 19-24,47 percent; 35-50,
34 percent; 50 and over, 10 per-
cent.
Once a woman has decided to
have abreast reduction, she must
go to a plastic surgeon for a con-
sultation. According to Jill, it is
then that you decide what size
and shape you would like your
new bustline to be.
After that, the patient sched-
ules a surgery date. The actual
operation takes three or more
hours, and the woman usually
has to remain in the hospital for
several days.
According to a brochure admin-
istered by Falcone, the surgery
entails several incisions across
and on the underside of the
breasts. The surgeon removes
excess tissue, fat and skin on the
sides of the breast.
Falcone tells his patients there
will be some pain following the
operation.
He said the two major side
effects are possible numbness in
the breasts and a probable inabil-
ity to breast feed.
According to Jill, the results
definitely outweigh the pain.
"Yes, it's a week ofbeinguncom-
fortable, but it's something that
changes your whole life."
For Jill, one advantage of her
new bustline was being able to
See REDUCE, Page 27

SEPTEMBER ANSWERS
F O A M C R.T C OY
R NT WH O A A RE
A T O P T U T O R
C A B L E M E N
O S U A R E A ! T A L
L I T T L E S I IS T E R S
E A S E B E L IL R C A
S P A E X I S T
S U I T E P!I E R
O C T T E R M P A P E R
A L E T R I P Y A L E
R A M Y A M S L! D

Look for October
Crossword answers
in the November
issue of U.
Brought to you by:
SMITH CORONA

Free college for children of POWs, MIAs ...
Four students have enrolled at the U. of
Oklahoma under a state law that pays
the college or university tuition for aca-
demically qualified children of former or

I

WIT TUTTEL, INDEPENDENT FLORIDA ALLIGATOf

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