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September 26, 1989 - Image 22

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-26
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. 10 U. THE NATIQNAL&)LLEGE NEWSPAPER

9

Lif d Art SEPTEMBER 1989 SEPTEMBER 1989 Lars and Sense

U. THE NATIONAL OLLEGE NEWSPAPER 1

-I-

Acid House reaches America

I I

The subtk
problens
Of race
By David J. Neal
. Indiana Daily Student
Indiana U.
I can't skip class.
That's the first thing I think of
when someone asks me if there are
any disadvantages to being black at
a large university. Broad problems
like the dearth of minority faculty
and the barbs of obnoxious racists
don't really affect my day-to-day
existence, but the everyday things
that touch minorities are small and
irritating.
Like the attendance situation. I
can't skip class with any sort of
impunity.
As soon as an instructor looks over
the class, he knows if Im there or if I
decided the adultery and mental cru-
elty on Divorce Court was more inter-
esting than whatever he had to say.
One of my classes has a lecture
section with roughly 150 students.
Any of the other 149 students can
take the morning off, knowing their
absence will not be conspicuous. Not
me. I'm a footprint in the snow.
The professor once identified me
solely on the assistant instructor's
physical description of me. I'd bet
my StevieWonder albums he
couldn't do that with anybody else
in the class.
Can you see the assistant instruc-
tor trying to come up with distin-
guishing characteristics for one of
my classmates? "He's kind of
between 5-10 and 6 feet, has black
hair ... wears a corduroy hat ... uh,
I think he has blue eyes ... maybe
wears a Cubs jacket ..."
Tough job. But with me, Im sure
it was easy. "Bout 6-2, 6-3. Black
guy"
"Oh, yeah."
Then there are those times when
people say something, notice you're
there, and think they've become this
year's Jimmy the Greek.
I was scanning the magazine rack
for the latest issue of Women's
Physique World while three
Caucasian junior high girls in front
of me flipped through a magazine.
One said, "Tracy Chapman is so
ugly. I mean, her music is good, but
she's just ugly."
The other two girls turned and
See RACE, Page 15

By Darren Cahr
and Stacey Bashara
a The Northwestern Review
Northwestern U., Chicago
An NU student strides down Sheridan
Road, her chest covered with an enor-
mous, yellow, smiling face. The eyes on
her shirt are oval and the smile turns up
at the sides. It looks like a visual homage
to Bobby McFerrin, except for one ele-
ment: a bullet hole and blood sit where
the nose should be.
In a dormitory room, hunched over a
Macintosh computer, senior Adam
Buhler manipulates beats and mea-
sures, baselines and samples, until a
mass of rhythm and noise pours from his
speakers.
What these images have in common is
acid house, a movement of music and
fashion, philosophy and social politics
that has already swept across a great
deal of England and which is now mak-
ing inroads in the United States.
"I like acid house because it allows you
to see nirvana and jack your body at the
same time," says senior Jay Haesly. And
it is that concept of pure hedonism which
underpins the appeal of this throbbing
collage of sounds and sensation.
Buhler, whose in-room studio is an acid
house laboratory, says the music is a
catylist for "forgetting the superficial
class structure and fundamentalist atti-
tudes" of modern life.
Many music critics and trend-watch-
ers dub acid house a re-emergence of
drug culture (though some would argue
it never died). A great deal of the move-
ment involves consumption of large
quantities of either Ecstasy, a pill-based
drug similar to LSD, or plain old LSD.
Since arriving on continent, acid house
has left a distinctly bitter taste in the
mouths of some local musicians. NU grad
student John Kezdy, vocalist for Chicago
punk band the Effigies, says acid house
may be fated to fizzle out in the United
States.
"The acid house movement is just the
most superficial and vapid thing," Kezdy
says. "It's not like punk, which was more
politically-based. It's a very fashion-ori-
ented and hedonistic thing. It realistical-
ly couldn't be anything but superficial."
Buhler is also skeptical of the move-
ment's domestic longevity, but insists
there is a message behind the music.
"The fashion element is unavoidable,"
he says. "It's all that people tend to see
because it's all that's shown to them. But

DARREN CAHR, NORTHWESTERN REVIEW, NORTHWESTERN U.

The mutilated smiley face has come to represent the nihilism and nirvana of the American acid
house movement.

Career&
Educational
E ADire ctry
THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

I.
V
L.
5,,.
-'-C

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Write or call:
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The University of Georgia
Circle No. 01
ENTRY LEVEL
POSITIONS
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The American Society of Student
Actuaries has the jobs! We are a
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An actuary is a problem solver who
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REGISTER NOW! Send a letter
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We will send you a registration form
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American Society of
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1400 Opus Place, Suite 960
Downers Grove, IL 60515
AS'SA
Circle No. 02
U. offers 5 editorial fellowships
U. The NationalCoege Newspaper
seeks qualified applicants for the 1990-
91 Editorial Fellowship Program. The
nine-month fel"owship is scheduled for
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U. showcases college journalism
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Applications are available from edi-
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I

STUDY IN SPAIN
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inquiries: Oirector, CC-CS
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219StrongSStreet
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.- 413.549.4543
Circle No. 08
BUSINESS STUDENTS
This spring take accredited business
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University of
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University
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Semester
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Applications are now being accepted
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Itis a learning adventure designed to
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For full information, including a catalog and application, call
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Institute for Shipboard Education,
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2E Forbes Quadrangle,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
15260.
Then prepare for the
learning adventure of
your life.

I

i

I

SPECIAL OFFER

Circle No. 07

Send your resume by October 20 and pay ONLY $17.50.
Thereafter pay $25.
With your resume, please send a check or money order to:
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Your resume will be entered into the database within two
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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
-25th Ann iversary
Semester, academic year, and summer
programs in LONDON, MADRID,
HEIDELBERG, PARIS, STRASBOURG,
and ENGELBERG, SWITZERLAND.

I

actually, acid nouse is about iaeas that
have been circulating since the '60s.
Timothy Leary is often sampled and
quoted. It's part of a very liberal move-
ment that wants to rise above this crack-
down on morality."
Acid house as a music form is difficult

to define. Its precursor is house music,
created inthe black gay clubs ofChicago's
South Side. DJs oscillate sounds, turning
the beat into something not unlike a
rhythm orgy held within a digital alarm

THERAPEUTIC CAMPS in Texas needs
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Degree Required. $14,000. Excellent
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SALESMANSHIP CLUB YOUTH CAMPS
BOYS' CAMP: 214/769-2500
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Providing child care in New York, Boston,
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earns you free room, board, medicalminsur-
ance, paid vacations, social and cultural
activities, college courses and minimum
$125/week. Bonus tripto Europe. Call(800)
727-AIFS ext. 6046. Or write American
Family Companion, Dept. U., 102
Greenwich Avenue, Greenwich, CT 06830.
CAMPUS REPS needed. Energetic, ambi-
tious individuals needed to post our sub-
scription cards on your campus. Set your
own hours, get some exercise and earntop
commission. We providethecards, you pro-
vide the effort. For more information, call or
write Agent Program, AMERICAN
Educational Services, 419 Lentz Court,
Lansing Ml 48917.1-800-444-4226.
COLUMBAN FATHERS
Young Catholic men interested in the
Missionary Priesthood should contact:
COLUMBAN FATHERS, Fr. Michael
O'Loughlin, National Vocation Director,
Columban Fathers, St. Columbans, NE
68056
(402) 291-1920

PLAN TO STUDY ABROAD
Attend a summer study seminar in
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'-I

*Undergraduate and graduate degree programs.
eInter-campus transfer possible.
*Courses in Business Administration, Hotel Man-
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*All classes taught in English.
*Also, 3- to 8-week intensive language courses in
West Germany and Spain for students 16 and older.
*International student body of 1500 students from
over 80 countries.
Schiller International University
US. Office: Dept. NC, 111 - 16th Street, N.W
s Washington, D.C. 200136
(202) 69-4133 or (00) 336-4133
" An accredited member. AICS.

I

International Studies Abroad

See ACID, Page 15

1 9-year-old seeks Scrabble crown

EA
Fa
SI
- For a
Circle No. 06

kRN ACADEMIC CREDITS
11, Spring & Summer Programs
pain " France * Mexico
Circle No. 06
complete packet and quick response call:
800-759-8522 U.S.
800-580-8222 Texas

By Lisa Luboff
The Daily Bruin
U. of California, Los Angeles
UCLA, a school often associated with
Olympic champions and football stars, is
also home to the youngest top-ranked
Scrabble player in the country.
Brian Cappelletto, a 19-year-old sopho-
more from Arizona, is just a step away
from becoming the number one player in
the country.
Ranked second nationally, Cappelletto
has won 11 tournaments in three-and-a-
half years of competition. He has placed
second or third in five other tournaments.
Scrabble is a popular board game
where each person gains points by
spelling words in a crossword-like forma-
tion on a specially marked board. Players
pick seven tiles with letters andpoint val-

ues printed on them. The tiles are then
used to create words, and players' total
points are tallied to determine a winner.
Many of the top competitors
Cappelletto plays against at tourna-
ments are 30 to 40 years old. At a tour-
nament in Boston, the next-youngest
competitor was 28.
In addition to tournaments,
Cappelletto usually plays between 10
and 20 games a week with local Los
Angeles competitors. Although his
friends often ask to play Scrabble with
him, none of them are at his level.
"I'm number two right now and I want
to be number one," he says."There's
always pride in doing something when
you're one of the best at it."
Being the best is not easy. Although
Cappelletto has played Scrabble since he
was 10, he still studies words and ana-

grams, or letter arrangements, and
remembers what letters create specific
words.
Training for a competition is similar to
athletic training, he says.A positive men-
tal attitude and preparation are impor-
tant, as are knowing words and remem-
bering strategies.
When he began competing at the age of
16, Cappelletto studied anagrams every
night. He now studies about once a week
using computer-generated books of ana-
grams.
Although-for many Scrabble becomes
an obsession, Cappelletto is careful to
remember that winning the game is not
as important as enjoying it.
"Some people are over-engrossed in it,
and it can be detrimental," he says."If I
couldn't control it, I wouldn't be in school
right now."

-

Rmufijn 1 :s iw
To receive further information, circle the appropriate
number(s) below. Return immediately to U. The National
College Newspaper, 3110 main Street, 3rd Floor, Santa
Monica, CA 90405.
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09
Your name
Address
City State _e_____aZip
Your Q) current college/university Q) alma mater

Semester in Spain, Ltd.
An Overseas Program of Trinity Christian College
e Fall Term: Sept i to Dec. 22 or Spring Term: Jan. 30 to May 29
e Program Located in Sevile, Spain
e Live with a Spanish Family
. Study Spanish Only -4 Hours a Day, for 4 Months
a Earn Up to16 Credits Per Semester
_ 4:"'.. " Fully Accredited through Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights,, Illinois
a Beginner through Advanced Courses Offered
L Government Loans and Pell Grants Available to Eligible Applicants
e Total Cost of $4,950 Per Semester Includes:
e Round-trip Transportation from NewYork to Spain Circle No. 04
e Room & Board with a Spanish Family
. Tuition
e Ten Year History
e Two Weeks Allowed for Personal Travel
Contact: SEMESTER IN SPAIN, 2065 Laraway Lake Dr. SE, U-20, Grand
Rapids, MI 49546

Year in school:
Q Fr. C)So.

Q Jr. Q Sr.

i

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