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September 18, 1989 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-18

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Page 10- The Michigan Daily -Monday, September 18, 1989

Festifall
Festifall brought over 100 groups to the center of campus int
an attempt to sell their organizations to students, faculty,
and members of the community. Some of the highlights
included live music which played on the Graduate Library
steps, a display of the martial arts by some students in the
lawn area, as well as the presence of everyone's favorite
evangelists. People crowded the Diag area from 11-4 in1
beautiful weather.

i

An overview of the diag Friday afternoon as hundreds of people explored what goes on outside the classroom .

Giant cheese plant under construction

ALLENDALE (AP) - A huge
new cheese processing plant under
construction here presents a mouth-
watering opportunity for Michigan
dairy farmers, company and industry
officials say.
The Leprino Foods Co. plant
will process 1 million pounds of
mild a day when it opens later this
month. That capacity could reach 2
million pounds a day - enough
mozzarella cheese for 350,000 12-
inch pizzas - when the plant reaches
full production in January.
"Thank God for pizza," said
Kevin Kirk, a dairy specialist with
the Michigan Farm Bureau in
Lansing. "Cheese consumption is
increasing 2 to 3 percent per year,
and mozzarella is carryingthe ball"
Denver-based Leprino bills the
100-acre Allendale plant as the
nation's largest cheese processing

facility. The Michigan Mild
Producer's Association owns the
plant. Leprino owns the equipment
and will run the facility under a 20-
year lease with the Novi-based
producers cooperative.
"This cheese plant is a real plus
for our competitive position in the
dairy industry," said Jack Laurie, a
Cass City dairy farmer and president
of the Michigan Farm Bureau.
"If farmers want to milk cows,
here's a company that's going to
suck up a lot of milk, and they're
making a consumer product, not
something for storage. Thatcan't
hurt," said Phil Kropf, general
manager of the Independent
Cooperative Milk Producers
Association, an MM PA competitor.
Michigan ranked fifth nation wide
in dairy production 10 years ago. But
it fell to seventh by 1988 after 800

state dairymen sold their herds to the
federal government under a program
to stem overproduction, Kirk said
Michigan moved past Texas into
sixth place in the second quarter of
1989, but state dairymen still face
higher feed and livestock housing
costs than their southern and western
competitors, Kirk said.
Leprino, which already operates a
mozzarella processing plant in
Remus, should provide Michigan

dairymen with a stable market,
Laurie said, adding, "What I hope for
is an impetus to move the dairy
industry back into the Midwest or at
least stop the erosion...to the
Southeast and West Coast."
The Leprino plant will employ
200 people when it begins full
operations. Those in the quality
control laboratory will bake pizzas
every day to check the quality of the
mozzarella.

JONATHIAN LISS/DaN~

Afghans
warn
ousted
king

SCIENCE AND
ENGINEERING
MAJORS!
The Air Force has open-
ings for men and women in
selected science and engineering
fields. To prepare you for one, you can
apply for an Air Force ROTC scholarship.
See what it can do for you. Contact the cam-
pus Air Force ROTC representative today
CAPT VOLKER GAUL
747-4093
........--------- - -a- sH
Ladership Emze~enice Starts Here

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) -
Afghan fundamentalists warned yes-
terday they will assassinate their
country's ousted king if he tries to
head a postwar government in
Kabul.
The threat comes after reports
that an envoy of the United States, a
major rebel backer, met with the ex-
iled king in Rome, where lived since
his nephew grabbed power in a 1973
coup.
"He takes a very grave risk of be-
ing shot," said Nawab Salim,
spokesperson for the hard-line Hezb-
i-Ilslami party run by anti-American
Gulbaddin Hekmatyar. "The muja-
hedeen (holy warriors) will not let
Zahir Shah come to Afghanistan."
Royalists among the rebels, most
notably Syed Gailani's National
Islamic Front of Afghanistan, say
the kins is the only Afghan able to
rally warring factions.
Asim Nasser-Zia, a spokesperson
for Gailani's group[, predicted Zahir

Michigan Alumni work here:
The Wall Street Journal
The New York Times
The Washington Post
The Detroit Free Press
The Detroit News
NBC Sports
Associated Press
United Press International
Scientific American
Time
Newsweek
Sports Illustrated
Because they worked here:
L71bie 31rb1┬žau vat~g

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presents
9/21/89

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