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September 14, 1989 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-14

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily -- Thursday, September 14, 1989

Study reveals
facts about fat

iN
Compiled from

BtrE
sociated Press ands

iF
taff reports

BOSTON (AP) - Would you
believe that a fast-food chicken
sandwich contains as much fat as 1.5
pints of ice cream? That a half dozen
chicken nuggets are fattier than a
hamburger?
Health-conscious diners who opt
for chicken and fish at fast-food
counters aren't doing themselves any
nutritional favors, says a committee
of the Massachusetts Medical
Society.
Fish and chicken, usually consid-
ered relatively low-fat alternatives to
red meat, can be booby-trapped by
fast-food cooks with vast amounts of
hidden fat.
In a report in today's New
BUDGET
Continued from Page 1
assembly members may propose an
alternative budget at next Tuesday's
meeting.
Williams was unavailable for
comment last night, but Karadshch
defended the MSA administration,
saying Dolgan didn't attend this
summer's budget work sessions.
Last March, the Phillips
administration surprisingly an-
nounced it had a surplus of $60,000
and spent it in two months, bringing
the assembly's year-end balance to
zero.
Because of bookkeeping errors,
however, the administration didn't

England Journal of Medicine, the
committee offers statistics about the
pitfalls of these and other menu
choices to back up its proposal for
wider disclosure of what's in fast
food.
Among the society's proposed
fast-food guidelines:
-Reveal the type and quantity of
fat in food, as well as the amount of
protein, vitamins and minerals.
-Provide printed menus for people
who want to restrict their intake of
salt, calories or fat.
-Identify the nutrient content of
items on salad bars, especially such
selections as potato salad and dress-
ings.
realize that this money was owed to
to Student Legal Services and the
Ann Arbor Tenants Union to pay
back missed payments.
When the new Williams
administration checked its records
last April, it realized these organiza-
tions were owed $99,000.
After the University's Board of
Regents threatened several times
over the summer to cut MSA's
funding entirely, it agreed to bail out
the assembly and work out an plan
to pay back Student Legal Services
and the tenants' union in install-
ments. In return, MSA agreed to
extend their financial audit 4 months
to Dec. 31 so future deficits would
not be overlooked.

Hungary may revise rules on
moving East bloc citizens
BUDAPEST, Hungary - The deputy foreign minister said yesterday
that Hungary's agreements limiting movement of East bloc citizens are
out of step with its human rights commitments and it will seek to revise
them.
Ferenc Somogyi also said Hungary will continue to dismantle border
barriers but does not plan to be a springboard to the West.
Budapest's decision this week to allow the exodus of more than 12,000
East Germans to the West was "a unique step," Somogyi said.
In Austria, border authorities said that by late afternoon the number of
East Germans crossing from Hungary en route to West Germany had
climbed to 12,545 since the freedom convoy began at midnight Sunday.
Smoking bill to face showdown
WASHINGTON - Tobacco state lawmakers vowed yesterday to grind
the Senate to a procedural crawl unless attempts to ban smoking on all
airline flights are dropped, but their unbowed opponents said they
welcomed a showdown.
Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell (D-Maine) planned a vote for
today on whether to block a filibuster by cigarette industry supporters.
The filibuster - unlimited debate in hopes of preventing a vote - is
aimed at killing legislation by Sen. Grank Lautenberg (D-NJ.) expanding
current airline smoking restrictions to all domestic flights.
The maneuvering came as outgoing Surgeon General C. Everett Koop
told a congressional hearing that minors should be forbidden from buying
cigarettes from vending machines.
Ford plans new car generation
DEARBORN - Ford Motor Co. plans to spend $1.5 billion to
develop the next generation of Ford Escort and Mercury Tracer subcom-
pact cars, to be introduced in mid-1990, the company said yesterday.
The cars will be made at Ford plants in Wayne, Mich., where the
Escort is assembled now, and Hermosillo, Mexico, where the Tracer is
made.
The new generation of Escort and Tracer will be introduced in the
spring as a 1991 model. Ford executives declined to talk about details of
the car at the 1990 models' introduction yesterday.
Ford is making few large-scale changes for the 1990 model year.
About $600 million will be invested at the Wayne plant and about
$260 million at the Mexican plant. The remaining $640 million will be
spent at Ford component plants, for retooling suppliers, and in other Ford
divisions linked to the new Escort and Tracer program.

f
t
t
i

s9K'9
JOSH MOORE/Daily
40 days and 40 nights
Cindy McDonnell (in raincoat) and Rob McPherson (right) of the Inter-
Varsity Christian Fellowship work on a scale model of Noah's Ark the
group is building on the Diag.

POLLACK
Continued from Page 1
legislation on cleaner air and water
was necessary, the greater issue was
abortion because it was happening
now,
Currently, there are four abortion
bills before the State Senate. Senate
Bill 513 would require parental or
UM News in
The Daily
764-0552

guardian consent (or a judicial hear-
ing) for the abortion of a minor.
SB514 would require tests to de-
termine the viability of a fetus in the
case of women at least 20 weeks
pregnant; would prohibit the abor-
tion of a viable fetus under certain
circumstances and would prohibit
public funds, facilities, and employ-
ees to be used for any abortion not
necessary to save a woman's life.
SB515 would prohibit public
funds to be used for abortion coun-
seling, and SJR H would initiate a
voter referendum about a constitu-
tional amendment prohibitin-g public
employees from using health bene-
fits for an elective abortion.

DOMINO'S
Continued from Page 1
choice as to whether or not they
want to contribute to his causes."
Engelbert said the group will
continue the boycott until the next
owner is known.
Earlier this year, the National
Organization of Women filed a civil
rights complaint against Domino's
on the basis of religious
discrimination, after Monaghan
cancelled a NOW fundraiser at his
Domino's farms headquarters. A
Domino's spokesperson said the
cancellation was due to Mr.
Monaghan's religious beliefs against
abortion.

In 1988, Monaghan donated
$100,000 to support proposal A,
which banned Medicaid-supported
abortions in Michigan.
Becky Belknap, who owns three
Domino's franchises in Ann Arbor,
said the boycott, if it had any effect,
hurt franchise owners more than Mr.
Monaghan, even though franchises
pay a percentage in royalties.
Gary Grimes, manager of the
North Campus Domino's, agreed.
"Any boycott hurts me and my
employees more than it will affect
Monaghan," he said. He said the
boycott had affected business at his
store, one of Belknap's franchises.
Pavelich said it is not yet known
who will buy Domino's.

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--
FINISH

Inmate
LANSING -- A
when Department oft
tube to force-feed liq
Department spok
the force-feeding, des
Acuna, of Detroit
a third of his bodyv
March 3.
Paul Denenfeld, l
said the force-feeding
peaceful political pro
"It seems to me,
have certain fundam
said.
Denenfeld said A
conspiracy to deliver
constitutionally prote
EXT
You can
A man was caug
Memorial Stadium an
Police said Alan 2
after the Baltimore C
Police said he eni
ground crew keeps eq
After picking up
Rick Brown, a mem
Instead, Zlotorzynsk
With Brown an
Zlotorzynski ran fro
men that the man ha
Before he couldn
John Corning. He w
leased from jail yeste

ends hunger
n inmate's six-month hunger str
Corrections doctors, armed with
uids to the man.
esperson Gail Light said Rene
pite having refused spoon-feeding
, was in satisfactory condition N
weight after living only on cof
egal director for the American C
g violated Acuna's right to priva
test.
if the Constitution means any
nental privacy rights and that in
Acuna's fast, designed to protes
r and delivery of more than twol
cted.
RAS
1't steal first.
...Or c
ght in a rundown while trying
nd police tagged him out before h
Zlotorzynski left the stands andv
orioles' game on Tuesday.
tered a storage area on the third
quipment, including the bases.
a base, the man turned to leave
nber of the grounds crew, whoc
i ran out of the stadium.
nd another grounds crew m
m the parking lot as Brown yell
A just stolen a base.
make it to his car, Zlotorzynski
vas charged with larceny of a $
rday.

strike
rike ended yesterday
a court order, used a-
Acuna did not resist
g earlier.
aving lost more than'
fee with sugar since
Iivil Liberties Union,
cy and to engage in a
ything, it means we
ncludes inmates," he
st his convictions of'
pounds of cocaine is
I..
an you?
g to steal a base at
he reached home.
walked onto the field
-base side where the
and was spotted by
ordered him to stop.
member in pursuit,
ed to several poliec-
was nabbed by Sgt.
35 base and was re-
y during the fall and winter
ll and winter (2 semesters)
00 out-of-town.
mt News Service.
379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
64-0554, Billing 764-0550
Mike Gil
Adam Benson, Stave Blonder,
ichad Eisen, Lory Knapp,
Taylor Lioln
Andea Gadd, Alyssa Katz
Tony Siber
Nabeel Zuberi
Mark Swartz
Kevin Woodson
Angela Wheals
ra Gruzen, Krislne LaLonde, Ann
a Songwe, Jessica Sick.
k Katz, Jod Leldiman, Eric Lemont,
dan, Pete Zelen.
n PalmiPnka

~be lliibigutn

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