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December 08, 1989 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-12-08

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4

ARTS

rho Michigan Daily ___
Students have a

Friday, December 8, 1989

Page 8 4

voice

A capella Amazin' Blue gains recognition

BY LYNNE COHN

"WE have a kind of inspired lunacy about us," said
graduate student Keith Chaffee. "It's definitely a learn-
ing experience, though, and I'm having a great time."
He is referring to the co-ed, 12-member a cappella
singing group of which he is a member, Amazin' Blue.
The group, which has been struggling for success since
October 1987, has finally earned official University Ac-
tivities Center committee status.
This year.seems to be a turning point in many ways
for Amazin' Blue. By the end of last year, they had re-
tained only two original members, causing them to hold
auditions for ten new spots this fall. "It's difficult only
in that we have to teach our music to all the members
instead of just a few new ones," said member Anna
Callahan. "However, it's actually great for the group.
We definitely have higher quality musicians this year."
Amazin' Blue, started by a graduate student from
Yale, wanted desperately to be a UAC committee. The
group earned a two-year probationary status during
which they performed as much as possible to gain
recognition. It worked. Now Amazin' Blue, as a full-
fledged UAC committee, is becoming recognized more
and more on campus.
"We produce a spring and a winter concert every
year," said Callahan. "We are striving to point our mu-
sie and arrangements more toward the musicianship
rather than pleasing the audience." Callahan wrote some
of the music that the group performs. One song entitled
"Blind, Deaf, and Dumb," whose lyrics were composed

by Chaffee and Fred Clarke, will be performed at
tonight's show.
Stronger ties are forming within the group, as they
are trying to do more together. Amazin' Blue had its
first retreat this fall at member Sarah Jackson's farm.
They spent time getting to know one another and, of
course, singing. The group rehearses four hours per
week and one hour for each section, although their prac-
tice time has skyrocketed as the show looms closer.
Even though they have no director or faculty assistance,
they seem to be doing just fine.
Clarke, a new member, said, "I have seen Amazin'
Blue perform since 1987 and watched them improve ev-
ery year. I was impressed to see so much talent. I con-
sider it an honor to be a new member. It's hard for me
to believe that I am now a part of the Amazin' Blue
awesomeness."
The members like to push themselves to do difficult
pieces. They do improvisational warm-ups, perform a
mix of music, and continue to learn from each other.
The group has produced a tape called Amazin' Blue's
Little Black Box, which is available for $6 at tonight's
show, and they are looking forward to their first tour
this spring.
"Everyone contributes different qualities to the
group," said Callahan. The group seems to click. They
help each other, they laugh together, and more impor-
tantly, they have become a group of friends.
Amazin' Blue will perform at 8 p.m. in the Michigan
Union Ballroom. Tickets can be purchased at the door
for $2.

A

A

14

Opera without the

BY SHERRILL L. BENNETT
ARE you interested in musical the-
ater and opera, but don't have time
to sit through an entire production?
The School of Music Opera Work-
shop has a solution. Tonight and
tomorrow evening at the School of

Music, the Opera Workshop will
perform scenes from the opera and
musical theater repertoire ranging
from Gilbert and Sullivan's Mikado
and Gondaliers to Rossini's Barber
of Seville, and Bizet's Carmen. Each
scene is a mini-production accompa-
nied by live music, costumes, make-
up, props, and simple sets and stage

ring parts
direction. The performances give
both participants and audiences a
broad sampling of different works -
and both end up having lots of fun.
"Everyone gets a chance to partic-
ipate, and it's great performing expe-
rience," says Kevin Murray, a
School of Music senior and voice
major involved in the production.
Voice students take Opera Workshop
as a class, part of their degree re-
quirements, but many elect to take it
more than once to get a chance to
sing portions of roles they love.
Ken Cazan makes his debut as
the Workshop's director and coordi-
nator, the first to hold this position
on a full-time basis. Don't miss this
free opportunity to get down to the

I

Ultraviolet rays cause cancer, anyways.
The best things in life...
An electric Santa at Meijer costs $50; faulty wiring will singe your beautiful lawn. Christmas in Cancun
will cost you a cool grand, easily, and your luggage will end up in Waco, Texas. Truer to the Holiday
Season, Charles Dickens (as assisted by Bert Hornback) will read A Christmas Carol tonight and
tomorrow at 8 p.m. in the University Museum of Art. School of Music harpists will perform at 7:45 p.m.
Caroling, courtesy of the Residential College Singers, will follow the reading. Doors open at 7:15 p.m.
Admission is by free ticket only.

HIDDEN ELECTIVES! !!!
LS&A students (and others, too), there

I

best parts of the musical theater and
opera experience.
T1lE OPERA WORKSHOP takes
place tonight and tomorrow at 8
p.m. in the School of Music's Mac-
intosh Theater. Admission is free.

are electives

available to you

outside

your school.
Do you need help in managng stress,
-improving your diet & developing an
exercise program? If you are interested in
these & other health topics then N223 is
for you. Get a syllabus at the Health Service
by calling 763-6880 or by messaging Judith
Hill on MTS-UB.
Sign up for Personal Health & Wellness,
N223 (DIV715) 2 credit hours, TTH 11-12
Check with your advisor - this may be
right for you!
Sponsored by UM Health Services and the
School of Nursing
SHAMAN DRUM BOOKSHOP
INVITES YOU TO A PARTY
TO CELEBRATE THE PUBLICATION OF

B U E E I

NTHE SPOTLIGHT
Lenora Champagne, a New
York director, author, and perfor-
mance artist, will present some dy-
namic art tomorrow at 8 p.m. in the
Trueblood Theatre.
Tom Simonian, DJ and ubiqui-
tous campus figure, has a best of the
'80s show in New Music tonight
and in Reggae tomorrow night at the
U Club; he will continue the best in
those genres on December 15 and 16
and January 12 and 13. Expect the
usual giveaways and prizes.

Share the
news,
10 UtiI

r

IoN

C.O.N.C.E.R.T

Michigan Union Ballroom
Friday, December 8
Tickets $2.00
8 P.M.
/A Cutter
MES

ARE YOU THICK AND TIRED OF IT?
The Weight Control Clinic
at The University of Michigan

r

r--

L

Nutrition Seminars, Exercise Classes, Counseling, Body Composition
Testing, Computer Diet Analysis, Personal Exercise Training

----p

11

#

* Winter Program Begins January 29, 1990
Registration by Appointment January 8-25
*Winter Open House, January 18, 7-Bpm
Room 1250 Central Campus Recreation Building
747-2722

4'

BACKGROUNDS
Works by People of Color

Volume 1 Numb
14

$3.00
C6 .D
r

L
F

d

!.
E
~ i
t
a
1
ERID n

Please join us to celebrate
the birth of BACK-
GROUNDS, a new journal
dedicated to providing a fo-
rum for the creative works of
people of color in the educa-
tional system. BACK-
GROUNDS is published un-
der the editorial direction of
Curtis Chin and Darci
McConnell, two University
of Michigan students. The
first issue includes work by
Ali Mazrui, Duane Niatum,
Renuka Uthappa, Scott
Wong, and a number of other
writers, photographers, and
artists. March Fong Eu, the
Secretary of State of Califor-
nia, says in an open letter to
the magazine: "We must
work to change ... stere-
otypes, those ways we see
ourselves and those ways we
see others who are different
fromus."BACKGROUNDS
is an exciting first reply to
this challenge.

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Copies

_

Than'.

* Floppy Disks
* FAX Service
" Resumes
* Collating & Binding

* Laser Typesetting
* Instant Passport Photos
* Stationery &
Office Supplies

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