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January 16, 1989 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY,

'89

"Somewhere I read of the freedom of assembly. Somewhere I
read of the freedom of speech. Somewhere I read of the freedom
of the press. Somewhere I read that the greatness of America is
the right to protest for right."
-Martin Luther King, Jr., April 3,1968
For more of the civil rights leader's words, and photos of the weekend's events, see page 5. For a list of today's events see page 3.

b riyitgannaBeayfefe
Ninety-nine years of editorial freedomn

Vol. IC, No. 75 Ann Arbor, Michigan - Monday, January 16, 1989 Copyright 1989. The Michigan Daily

Ak

'U',

officials

optimistic
-for MLK Day

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ
Whether today's Martin Luther
King/Diversity Day celebration will
ease racial tension on campus re-
mains to be seen, but University ad-
ministrators have been hoping and
speculating that today's events will
do just that.
"I certainly expect that it will
help to alleviate (problems of racial
strife on campus)," said Provost and
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Charles Vest. "It is designed to get
these and other issues out in the
open."~
But despite administrators' praise
of MLK/Diversity Day, their opti-
mism was tempered with concern
that many students might not choose
to attend any of the scheduled events.
"I'm concerned that there may be
more faculty and staff that participate
than students," said University
President James Duderstadt. "We
cannot demand that students attend,
but we think it is terribly important

that they do attend."
"I think (Diversity Day) presents
a tremendous opportunity for every-
one who chooses to participate," said
Regent Thomas Roach (D-Saline). "I
think if we can get several thousand
people to participate, it will be a
success - even if we don't get
35,000."
But while administration officials
are "cautiously optimistic," student
leaders have expressed mixed feelings
about today's events.
"There are going to be a lot of
people here who have a lot to say,
and that's important," said Michigan
Student Assembly President Michael
Phillips. "(But) the people who need
the education the most aren't going
to go."
"Something has to be done to
reach everyone on campus, like a
mandatory class or a mandatory
symposium, that will reach even the
See Turnout, Page 2

Unity march ROBIN LOZNAK/Doily
Members of the Ann Arbor Second Baptist Church commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in their annual Unity March

'U' Michigan Mandate receives mixed reviews

BY FRAN OBEID
AND JONATHAN SCOTT
The Michigan Mandate - Presi-
dent James Duderstadt's plan to in-
crease minority student and faculty
numbers at the University - has
received considerable publicity, as
well as support and criticism from
the University community in recent
weeks.
The mandate is considered by
some primarily a response to an or-
ganized movement of student upris-
ings beginning in the spring of
1987, which demanded University

action to a series of racially-moti-
vated incidents on campus. Others
consider it a response to changing
national demographic trends.
"Activities of students in the
spring of 1987 were beginning to
say that there is something wrong
and that there are some things that
need to be looked at," Vice Provost
for Minority Affairs Charles Moody
explained.
Concerned Faculty member and
English Prof. Alan Wald said it is
clear the mandate is a direct result of
the United Coalition Against

Racism uprising two years ago.
"Historically, it has been student
uprisings on campus that have forced
the issue. The Black Action Move-
ment of the late '60s, for example,
forced the University to address mi-
nority concerns, resulting in the cre-
ation of the Center for Afro-Ameri-
can and African studies. The UCAR
uprising has had a similar effect."
The mandate itself proclaims to
be a response to the changing demo-
graphics of America: by the year
2000, for example, one of three
Americans will be a person of color,

while Hispanics will comprise the
single largest population group in
America.
The mandate's central goal is to
"commit to the recruitment, support,
and success of underrepresented mi-
nority groups among our students,
faculty, staff, and leadership." Ulti-
mately, the mandate claims to seek
establishment of total University
minority enrollment in proportion to
national and state demographics.
The content of the mandate has
received mixed reviews from faculty
and students since it was unveiled by

Duderstadt in October.
Biology Prof. John Vandermeer, a
member of Concerned Faculty, con-
siders the mandate "extremely
vague."
"There are no concrete goals listed
and no specific targets; quite frankly,
I think the whole thing is a sham."
But Rackham Associate Dean for
Graduate Student Recruitment and
Retention James Jackson disagrees,
arguing that the mandate "helps put
muscle behind efforts already in ac-
tion," and indicates where the Uni-
versity's "major priorities" are.

"It is a kind of an evolving piece
that has been put to paper and is
now getting out," Moody said.
"People knew in the schools and
colleges how to increase minority
representation and then [told the ad-
ministration] 'here's what we can
do."'
But Wald reads the mandate as
"mostly abstractions." By avoiding
any serious commitment, Wald said,
the administration can easily allow
its promises to go unfulfilled as
See Mandate, Page 8

Minority Population Breakdown - Fall, 1988

30_

No toasting for
'M' in Champaign

Black:
Hispanic:
Native
American:
Asian
American:
Total:

2,011
824

20.

132

2,024
4,991

10-

/
/

J

M Nation
0 State
E University

c.
a)
CL

iL

M" am]

BY DOUG VOLAN
SPECIAL TO THE DAILY
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Who said
you need a big man to win a Big Ten
basketball game?
Second-ranked Illinois (15-0
overall, 3-0 Big Ten) sure didn't in
its 96-84 victory over sixth-ranked
Michigan (14-2, 2-1) in front of a
sellout crowd of 16,499 Saturday at
Assembly Hall in Champaign.
Despite the fact that none of their
starters were over 6-foot-7, the
Fighting Illini finished even with
Michigan in rebounding at 33.
Illinois led the contest the entire
second half.
"They're an outstanding ball
club," Michigan coach Bill Frieder
cniAl "'T'hp'ra nct en n.nrlr at Porr,

"It was difficult to cover them,"
Henson said. "They're big and they're
good.
But not good enough.
See Toasting, Page 19

0.

.9-- J:.

Black Hispanic Native
American

Asian
American

Total
Minority

Minority enrollment up in
health science schools

W T>t7 *XVd' YT A Ti T TTCOTT!'i

C -.1- IA --l- -r

LIU I ~

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