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February 08, 1989 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-02-08

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0

Page 6- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 8, 1989

Group protests
nuclear waste

04

BY PATRICK STAIGER
Over 300 residents of Ohio,
Indiana, and Michigan converged on
the Capital last night for the
governor's state of the state address
to oppose the siting of a radioactive
waste facility in Michigan.
"We don't want birds with two
beaks. We don't want fish we can't
eat. And we don't want Michigan
produce that glows," said Ellen Beal,
who is the founder of Don't Waste
Michigan, a citizens group in
Michigan which organized the rally.
Organizers said Michigan,
because of large amounts of ground
water, is a bad location for nuclear
waste. They also said not enough
Nuclear waste exists in the US for

16 nuclear waste sites being planned
nationwide. Only two are necessary.
The seven-state Midwest
Interstate Low Level Radioactive
Waste Commission chose Michigan
in July 1987 to provide a disposal
site for radioactive waste from
nuclear power plants, laboratories,
industries, and hospitals.

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"Placing these nuclear waste,
some of which will remain highly
radioactive and lethal for thousands
of years, anywhere in the great Lakes
basin, is the greatest threat to the
environment of Michigan and the
region that could possibly happen,"
said Mary Sinclair, member of Don't
Waste Michigan.

0

JESSICA GREENE /Doily I

Minority panel stresses communication

BY VERA SONGWE
About 70 Black students and staff
members met yesterday at the
William Monroe Trotter House to
discuss improving relations among
themselves and how this could pro-
duce a better environment at the
University.
"I am a person who sees the value
of student support groups and I ad-
vocate them," said Director of the
Minority Engineering Program Der-
rick Scott. "If we cannot communi-
cate amongst ourselves it will be
hard for us to network with other
components of the University."
Scott, who graduated from the

University in 1974, said even
though communication among Black
students has substantially improved
since the 1970s, it must continue to
improve.
"You can never have enough
communication; we always have to
keep working to keep the channels
open," he said.
Bates Resident Director Alicia
Hunter said, "Feelings of isolation,
fear of rejection, expectation of oth-
ers and the stressful atmosphere
found on campus are among the
main reasons why there is a bridge
in communication among the stu-
dents."

Later in the show the audience
discussed relationships between the
sexes, the need to recognize the right
role models in society, and the im-
portance of helping the communities
they come from.
"We cannot afford not to do any-
thing for our communities; there are
many things we can do," said
Minority Student Services Associate
Barbara Robinson. "We must never
forget about were we come from."
"We are not going to solve all the
issues in this one program but if we
can come in and talk on these issues,
that is good," said Barron Wallace,
president of the Black Law Students

Association.
Students who attended the forum
had positive things to say. "I'll like
to see things like this be done more
often," said Chris Jones, a business
school senior. "These are things we
confront everyday and it's important
that we discuss them."
"I think it was a valuable
experience," said Kevin Williams,
engineering graduate student. Like
manyaothers present, he felt forums
such as this are helpful because they
bring understanding of possible
solutions as to why there is not
enough communication among
Black students.

LSA
Continued from Page 1
culture of the real world."
Instead of providing leadership,
"the administration only reacts when
students protest and when they raise
the spectre of 'bad publicity," hetold
the audience.
"Basically we are not up against
an administration that is learning
from its mistakes; we're up against a
fancy public relations outfit that
specializes in catch phrases and
superficial window dressing," he
When questioned by students at
last night's Michigan Student
Assembly meeting about the
Executive Committee decision,
Duderstadt said the administration
will always make mistakes.
"But we have to keep our eye on
the ball and pick ourselves up after
we fail and learn from that
experience," he said.
In a Feb. 3 letter to UCAR,
Duderstadt said, "It does appear that

there has been a lapse in both
communication and coordination in
this recent effort." The letter was in
response to UCAR's request that
Duderstadt explain the Executive
Committee's decision and the
president's role in the matter.
Duderstadt said it would be
inappropriate for him to get involved'
in specific cases that deal with
minority hiring issues.
Cathy Cohen, a member of
People Organized for Women's
Equality and Rights, told the
audience that as long as Duderstadt
refuses to take responsibility for
individual cases, his plan to increase
minority faculty is unenforceable.
All of the six speakers who
addressed the audience stressed what
they called "the issue of access."
They said the decision to exclude a
highly qualified Black woman
candidate from the University is
consistent with the University's
historical hiring practices.
-Daily News Staffer Fran Obeid
contributed to this report.

.W aste
Continued from Page 1
residents will feel the same about a
waste- management tax.
"Ann Arbor taxpayers have a
good track record for specific issues,"
he said. "It's a very focused issue.
We all know we have a garbage

problems."
Mike Garfield, environmental is-
sues coordinator at the Ecology
Center, believes that residents are
prepared to take care of the situation.
"I think everyone realizes that
there is a huge crisis out there and
they're ready to do it," he said.
The city will not be asking for
the voter approval of the tax until
next year.

Lester

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Continued from Page 1
study Holocaust literature. "At night
I dreamed I was there [in the
concentration camps]," he said. In
his dreams he would chant the
"Sh'ma," the holiest Jewish prayer.
As he studied Judaism, Lester
said, "My first response was a
feeling of having come home." He
wanted to convert to Judaism but
was afraid that he would not be
accepted. At the same time, he felt
guilty for not going to synagogue.
Finally, in 1982, he decided to
convert. "I was welcomed by born
Jews," he said. "I must'thank the
Jewish people for making me a part
of it."
"My only regret," he said, "is that
I have lived so much of my life not
being Jewish."
"A Jew is created... to praise God,
to love God," he said. The Jewish
holy books are each a love song to
God, "And so," he paused, "am I."
Aftet the talk, Professor Lester
discussed the Rev. Jesse Jackson and
relations between Jews and Blacks.
He said that Jackson has become "a
messianic figure," which is "very
dangerous."
He said Jackson will never
dissociate himself from Black
Moslem leader Louis Farrakhan,

Council
Continued from Page 1
an LSA sophomore.
Administrator representative
Shirley Clarkson also expressed op-
timism in working with the other
council members.
"I hope that it will be a fresh ap-
proach with new people. I hope that
we can work effectively together,"
said Assistant to the President and
council member Shirley Clarkson.
Last term, representatives from
the Michigan Student Assembly, the
Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs, and the adminis-
tration proposed guidelines to help
the council run more smoothly.

"My hope is that it will work
this time. We reviewed the difficuli-
ties in the past and built ways to ad-
dress them in current procedures,"
said SACUA chair and interim Uni-
versity council member Beth Reed.

a

The new council will include a
neutral mediator to help resolve dis-
agreements if they arise. Conflict
may also be avoided because two
student members and one faculty
member of the council participated
in making the guidelines.
MSA and SACUA appoint the
council's student and faculty mem-
bers respectively. Reed said SACUA
is currently searching for a third fac-
ulty member to replace her and serve
permanently on the council.

Lester
...speaks on Judaic conversion

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who has referred to Judaism as "a
gutter religion," but said Jews mus
make peace with Jackson fo
political reasons.
Lester believes that Jackson, after
several unsuccessful overtures to
Jews, is baffled as to how he car
obtain Jewish support. He criticized
the Jewish media for stressing
Jackson's negatives and ignoring his
good points.

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'Medical
1 Continued from Page 5
Mogbo said she is not out to
s change the system but added that she
would like to see the time require-
ment reduced so her daughters could
be surgeons if they choose.
Not everyone shares this view.
Polasek said she is more interested
in surgery because she can see the
results right away.

The numbers for the University's
medical school (about 33 percent
women) are about equal to the na-
tional average but well below the
averages at Wayne State and Michi-
gan State universities, the state's
two other medical schools, said
Fabrik.
LSA senior Lynnette Wrob-
lewski, who has already been ac-
cepted to medical school, said she
attended because she was interested
in the differences women experience
as a group.

_ - ..

5-9

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