100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1989 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FEBRUARY 1989 m News Features

U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER 3

Sexual harassment jeopardizes teacher-student relationship

By Denise Dador
The Guardian
U. of California, San Diego
A recent disciplinary case against a
U. of California, San Diego (UCSD)
professor has raised questions about
the prevalence of sexual harassment
on campuses, prompting UCSD offi-
}cials to clarify students' rights and
provide more support programs.
Paolo M. Dau, an assistant profes-
sor of philosophy, was denied a te-
nured position as a result of proven
complaints that he harassed three
women graduate students in June
1985.
UCSD information officers pointed
out that the term "sexual harass-
pment" encompasses any unwanted
attention of a sexual nature directed

at a student in an academic environ-
ment that creates a hostile atmos-
phere and interferes with the stu-
dent's academic performance.
Nancy Wahlig, coordinator of the
Student Safety Awareness Program
described harassers as persons who
are normally in positions of power
over other people.
"Sexual harassment has devastat-
ing effects on its victims," Wahlig
said. "It often results in students
leaving school, failing exams and feel-
ing anxiety and confusion."
She explained that students often do
not realize they are being harassed or
else they will tend to minimize the situ-
ation because they are afraid of jeopar-
dizing t heir grades or
recommendations.

Sexual harassment has only been
gaining attention on American col-
lege campuses in crecent years,
according to Pat Kitcher, a philoso-
.phy professor and chair of the
statewide Committee on the Status of
Women.
"It's something that people have
known about for years. But only re-
cently have people begun to realize
that it's the university's obligation to
fix it," she said.
One student, who did not want to be
identified, recalled that one of her
professors had been consistently com-
plimenting her before he finally
approached her and asked her out on
a date.
Although the student was worried
she'd offend her professor she "told

him exactly where we stood. I said,
'I'm a student and you're a teacher and
we should keep it on that level.' "
Most women who experience
harassment tend to blame them-
selves for what their professors did.
Wahlig explained that victims some-
times felt that it was something they
did or the way they dressed that en-
couraged their professor's behavior.
She stressed the importance of
knowing what harassment is because
the ability to identify the problem will
be beneficial once students leave col-
lege and enter the workplace.
Students who feel they might have
been victims of harassment are urged
to seek out and speak with informa-
tion officers located at several stu-
dent support centers.

Morals
Continued From Page 1
force chairman and religion professor
Sam Hill said the group will stick to
issues such as cheating and racial prob-
lems.
q"We're going to focus more on person-
integrity and how morality will effect
the classroom," he said.
"The honor system is more for the
people who believe in it than the people
who violate it," Hill said.
Student Body President Scooter Wil-
lis suggested implementing a manda-
tory, one-credit freshmen class on mor-
als and ethics.
The class, in addition to orienting stu-
*nts to UF, would discuss morals,
minorities, cultural differences, subst-
ance abuse and even voting, he said.
Other state universities are working
to get the same sort of class at their
universities, Willis said.
Student Affairs Vice President Art
Sandeen, who acts as a liaison between
the committee and the administration,
said the university has an obligation to
atline acceptable behavior.
'In this country, we want to affect
people in positive ways or reinforce cer-
tain values," Sandeen said. "A college
education should consist of more than
just the accumulation of 125 credits."
University of Georgia MBA
Located near Atlanta, the South's busi-
ness hub, the Georgia MBA offers:
. One-year MBA program for ex-
ceptional individuals with
business degrees
. Two-year program for other
candidates
. 11 elective courses allow the
creation of specialized areas of
expertise
. Excellent microcomputer facili-
ties enhanced by a $2-million
IBM grant
. Assistantships w/fee waiver;
MBA internship and placement
services; low cost of living; and
renowned faculty
TE UNIVRST OF GEORGIA
Write or call:
MBA Program Director,
351 Blrooks Hall,GSB,
UGA, Athens, GA 30602
(404) 542-5336

Announcing
a breakthrough
of minor
proportions.

-6- 16.9" --

161"

The Smith Corona PWP 3 Personal Word Processor.

Our biggest idea yet just happens to be our
smallest idea yet.
Less than 17 inches across and weighing in
under 17 pounds, the Smith Corona PWP 3
personal word processor redefines portability.
Yet for all its size (or, should we say, lack of it), there's
never been a portable word processor better equipped to
carry its own weight.
Using the PWP 3 is simplicity itself.
Your writing appears on the 8 line by 80 character
backlit display in front of you.You can move blocks of copy,
insert copy into existing paragraphs or delete copy in sec-
onds. All before you ever touch a piece of paper.
As for PWP 3's memory, it's simply unforgettable.
There's a 32,000 character internal memory as well as an
external memory via DataDisk. Each DataDisk has a capac-
ity of 100,000 characters!
Of course, PWP 3 wouldn't be complete without a

correction system. And this one makes correcting mistakes
as easy as making them.
The Spell-Right" 50,000 word dictionary catches
misspelled words and typing errors quicker than you can.
WordEraser* erases your errors. Word-Right* AutoSpell*
even displays the correct spelling and replaces the error
for you.
Add deluxe features like automatic reformatting, auto-
matic page numbering, bold type, dual pitch and much more,
and you've got a lot of word processor ina surprisingly small
package.
There is one other thing that will surprise you about
PWP 3. Its price. You'll be happy to hear that PWP 3 is sur-
prisingly affordable.
You see, we didn'tS M ITH
just make PWP 3 simple CORONIX
to use. We also made it STECHNOLOGY
simple to buy. ATYOURTOUCH"

For more information on this product, write to Smith Corona Corporation, 65 Locust Avenue, New Canaan, CT 06840
or Smith Corona (Canada Ltd.), 440Tapscott Road, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada M1B 1Y4.

Contact School
Directly

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan