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November 29, 1988 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-29

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 29, 1988

Tornadoes

smash N.C.

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - Torna-
does skipped without warning like a
"big bouncing ball" across North
Carolina's capital city early yes-
terday, smashing homes and churches
before heading into rural areas. Four
people were killed and at least 151
injured.
"I can remember hearing a big
gust of wind like a hurricane and then
I could hear the wood tearing and I
thought 'Oh God, this is it. I'm
gone.' I just buried myself under the
bed," said Betty Bell of Raleigh.
The storms brought reminders of
the 24 twisters that ripped a 250-mile
path through the state in 1984,
killing 44 people, injuring more than
800, and leaving 2,300 homeless.
Yesterday's twisters destroyed
mobile homes, damaged churches,
toppled several houses onto their
sides, and threw power lines onto
houses and streets, leaving more than
6;500 homes without electricity for
several hours. Trees were snapped
several feet from the ground along
the storm's path.
About 500 people were left
homeless in Raleigh, where the
storms struck without any advance
notice, said Mayor Avery Upchurch.
The National Weather Service issued
no tornado warnings or watches
before the tornadoes struck.
Roger Friedenson, a spokesperson
for the Insurance News Service in
Raleigh, said insurance companies
anticipated a possible loss of $30
million in North Carolina from the
twisters. The 1984 storms caused
$65 million in damage.
The twisters first struck around
one A.M., flattening a Raleigh K-
Mart store and four three-story

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Change would give Kremlin
too much power, say republics
MOSCOW - The Communist Party Central Committee - the
party's policy-making body - yesterday endorsed constitutional changes
that critics say give the Kremlin too much power, setting the stage for
approval over the objection of several restive republics.
Officials in Estonia, the tiny Baltic republic that led the challenge to
Kremlin authority by declaring its sovereignty in internal policy and its
right to review all new Soviet legislation, said they would stand firm
despite a ruling their move was unconstitutional.
The more than 300 members of the Central Committee, meeting on
the eve of an extraordinary meeting of the Supreme Soviet, or national
parliament, declared the amendments "will mean a major step along the
road of democratization of Soviet society," the official Tass news agency
said.
Gorbachev proposed the amendments to make the system more
democratic, but the Estonians, as well as activists in Latvia, Lithuania,
Armenia, and Georgia have criticized them for taking away some of the
local control that Gorbachev has said he wants to foster.
Trade deficit improves 5.4%
WASHINGTON - A drop in
oil prices and higher costs for TaeDeii
U.S. farm products helped provide
a 5.4 percent improvement in ouarterty trade deficit
America's trade deficit from July In billons of doars.
through September, the third
consecutive quarterly decline this
year, the government reported ~~' 0 28.5
yesterday.
The Commerce Department 30
said the imbalance between what
America imports and what it sells
abroad narrowed to $28.53 billion 20
in the third quarter, the best
showing in three-and-a-half years.
Analysts predicted the deficit 10
for all of 1988 should be at least
20 percent lower than 1987,
marking the first time since 0 N I I *
President Reagan took office in
1981 that the trade deficit has
shown improvement. . . AN#~0Ot
Negotiators extend Soviet-
American trade agreement
WASHINGTON - Soviet and American trade negotiators agreed
yesterday to extend through 1990 an agreement calling for the Soviet
Union to buy at least 9 million metric tons of grain a year from the
United States.
The 27-month extension signed in Moscow revived a five-year pact
that expired Sept. 30.
Initial reaction from farm groups was positive.
Barry Jenkins, a spokesperson for the National Association of Wheat
Growers, said farmers would be relieved to get some assurance that Soviet
demand would remain undiminished.
Criticism of the deal, however, came from Rep. Dan Glickman, D-
Kan., chair of the House Agriculture subcommitte on wheat, soybeans,
and feed grains.
"This administration has driven down the price of grain in order to
export more, but they can't seem to close the deal," he said.

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Associoated Press
Residents of Raleigh, N.C., sift through what remains of their homes yesterday after a
tornado ripped the northern section of the city earlier in the day. The severe weather in the
region has reportedly killed at least five people.

apartment buildings nearby at the
start of a 10-mile path of destruction
in northern Wake County.
"I went to the back of the store
and saw I couldn't make it," said K-

1.'N ,$ ,-, . - . :- :
: .
.0.11 88189:
Salary Supplements
: will be here Dec. 1st!!
Copies will be available only at Student
Publications Building, 420 Maynard, be-
'* tween the hours of 8:30am and 4:30pm
. Monday through Friday. $2.00 each
- - rti : . :.' . . . -
- & : . : . .-- ... ' : . : . : : . . .

Mart employee Michelle Jones. "I
got to the toys and hid."
The Salvation Army in Wake
County coordinated donations of
blankets and clothing for four temp-
Instant
Pass port
Photos
kinko's
the copy center
540 E. Liberty 761-4539

orary shelters set up for people left
homeless.
In neighboring Virginia, one
tornado and high wind downed trees,
damaged property.
csJ
Continued from Page 1
Sotiroff, an LSA senior, said the
court is important because it will be
a resource for students. "We're here
for the students to utilize," he said.
"As we get more momentum and
recognition, the students will know
that they have a fair, impartial, non-
partisan and autonomous body to
hear their disputes."
CSJ made a budget proposal to
MSA of $5,600, which was reduced
to $4,900 when the members decided
that 10 black robes costing $700
were an extravagance. Certain items
costing $1,432, including a filing
cabinet and a tape recorder were ap-
proved, while other items, such as a
computer and a typewriter were
tabled until tonight's MSA meeting.

6
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1220 S. University 747-9070
Michigan Union 662-1222
(open early, open late)

"G

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r9,kNEMA BRCOy

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
OFFICIAL STUDENT/FACULTY/
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Dec. 29 - Jan. 4
Full Package from
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Includes:
- All Official U-M Tour Activities including the
Michigan New Year's Eve Celebrationwith the U-M
Marching Band, the Friars Performances
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- Non-stop roundtrip charter air
- 6 nights at the Marriott Los Angeles Airport Hotel
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EXTRAS
Let's face it, it was simply
love at first transplant
GRAND RAPIDS - New hearts made sweethearts of Donald
Homrich and Terri Nelson.
Both have received transplants to replace hearts destroyed by
cardiomyopathy, a degenerative disease. The couple met when Homrich,
who was involved in a local support group, called Nelson last November
to offer encouragement and tell her about the group's activities.
"Some people meet in bars, we met because of surgery," Nelson said.
When Homrich called, "...I was still having some rejection problems
with my new heart and I wasn't the least bit interested in the support
group," Nelson recalled.
"But I was interested in meeting this man with the very sexy voice,"
she said.
The phone call lasted three hours "because we had so much in
common," Nelson said. The two agreed to meet a couple of days later to
continue their conversation, which again, lasted for hours.
The two are now planning cross-country ski trips, a Christmas
vacation to the Bahamas, and college courses in January.
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$25.00 in-town and $35 out-of-town, for fall only $15.00in-town and $20.00 out-of-town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764--0550

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EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editor
University Editor
Opinion Page Editors
Associate Op. Page Editor
Photo Editors

Rebecca Blumenstein Sports Editor
Martha Sevetson Associate Sports Editors
Eve Becker
Andrew Mills
Jeffrey Rutherford Arts Editors
Cae Southworth Weekend Editor
Amy Harmon Associate Weekend Editor
Karen Handelman, Jahn Munson

Jeff Rush
Jule Holnan, Adam Schefter,
Adam Schrager, Pete Steinert,
Doug Volan
Lisa Magnino, Jim Poniewozik
Steve Gregory
Brian Bonet

News Staff: Victoria Bauer, Scott Chaplin, Miguel Cruz, Marion Davis, Paul De Roo], Noah Finkel, Kely Gafford, Alex Gordon, Stacy
Gray, Tara Gruzen, Donna ladipaolo, Steve Knopper, Mark Kolar, Ed Krachmer, Scot Lahde, Kristine LaLonde, Michael Lusig,
Alyssa Lustigman, Fran Obeid, Lisa Pola, Mic Schmidt, David Schwartz, Jonathan Scott, Ama Senkevitch, Noele Shadwick,
Monca Smith, Nathan Smith, Ryan Tutak, Mark Weisbrot, uisa Winier.
Opinion Staff: Muzzamil Ahned, Elizabeth Esch, Bil Gladstone, Krisin Hoffman, Rolie Hudson, Marc Klein, Karen Miler, Rebecca
Novick, Marcia Ochoa,Elizabeth Paige, Henry Park, Sandra Steingraber, Sue VanHattum.
Sports Staff: Adan Benson, Steve Blonder, Steve Cohen, Richard Eisen, Lain Raherty, Lisa Gibert, Mike Gil, Steve Ginns, Andy
Goytesman, Karen Gromala, David Hyman, Bethany Kipec, Lory Knapp, Jod Leichtnan, Eric Lemont, Taylor Lincoln, Josh Mihic,
Joy Moses, Miachael Salinsky, John Samnick, Jeff Sheran.
Arts Staff- Marisa Anaya, Greg Baise, Sheala Durant, Michael Paul Fisher, Mike Fischer, Robert Raggert, Andrea Gadd, Mirgie
Helnien, Brian Jarviven, D. Mara Lowenstein, Mike Rubin, Ari Schneider, Lauren Shapiro, Chuck Skarsaune, Mark Scwartz, Usha
Tummala, Nebeel Zuberi.
Photo Staff Alexandra Brez, Jessica Greene, Jose Juarez, Robin Loznak, David Lubliner, Lisa Wax.
Weekend Staff: John Shea i.. Fri.... Arv,.,d d

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