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November 18, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Police:
apist
I
still at
large
9 NATHAN SMITH
Ann Arbor police said no arrests
Iave been made in connection with
t ree recent campus-area rapes linked
tp, one man, and an investigation is
continuing into several other Ann
Arbor rapes which police say were
cbmmitted by another man.
Deputy Chief Walter Lunsford said
the second man is suspected of either
eight or nine sexual assaults since'
1986 in an area bounded by Huron
treet, Main Street and the Huron
River.
The perpetrator in many of these
9ssaults wears a mask and gloves,
tiormally enters through unlocked
doors, and claims to have either a Might Gents
4Inife or gun, police said. M
┬░The man has been described by
victims as a muscular, 5-foot-6 to 5- Frankie (played by Rick Titsworth) and his father (Steve
fopt-10 Black male between the ages Dixon) act out a scene in the University Players' presentat
of 25 and 40, police said. of The Mighty Gents, at the Trueblood Theater Nov. 10-20
Closer to campus, police are still.
investigating a series of three recent
npes, but said they have no suspects.
Sgt. Thomas Caldwell said last
week that one of two police compos- " -
ike sketches of the campus-area rapist
"pay be more accurate than the other.
One of the victims, according to
Caldwell, said the composite made by BY FRAN OBEID for us," she said. "We have th
the other victim resembled her at- More than a quarter of a million bers, the energy, and the you
tacker more than her own composite. families in the northeastern United don't have to give up one langt
But Det. Jerry Reynard said both States live in poverty, and 38 percent lieu of another... we need to be
composites are being used in the in- of them are Puerto Rican, said Awilda with our culture."
vestigation because they both repre- Orta, past director of the Office of This week marks the sixth
seht the victims' interpretations. "We Bilingual Education for the New York Puerto Rican Week organized
can't disregard either composite," he City Public Schools, campus Puerto Rican Assoc
said. "Among Hispanics, the Puerto Ri- Though a proposal was submi
Composites can never be com- can median income is the lowest," University President James Dud
pletely accurate because the victims Orta said during part of her Puerto for funding, the group received
underwent a traumatic experience and Rican Week presentation on Wednes- sponse, and proceeded to solici
are not able to remember precisely day. from over 20 offices of the ad
what the attacker looked like, Cald- Orta attributed the high poverty tration and the three student g
well said. levels of Puerto Ricans to a failure on ments.
He said composites are not exact the part of social institutions. "The "We were able to proceed w
portraits of the suspects, but rather are very institutions that are set up to week, but we did have to trim
used "to eliminate possible suspects." help limit participation," she said. some of the activities (due to
Police use a machine called the Examples of institutional failure funding). We would apprecia
"Identikit" to make composite include churches that restrict Spanish the administration be more e
sketches, Caldwell said. He said the masses to the basement and school in processing our proposal,
victims are given different sizes and systems that "postpone learning until Walter Dias, president of the
shapes of facial features, such as the English language is known," she Rican Association.
hoses and ears, and place them on dif- said. Puerto Rican Week contin
ferent heads until the composite re- "While you learn English, other day with speaker Francisco R
embles their attacker. skills can be learned, but the only Batiz, who will talk at 4:30 p
Caldwell refused to comment on way to do that is in a language that the "Migratory Aspects of the
the investigation, but did say that a you understand... the community and omy of Puerto Rico" in Hen
person is not a suspect solely on the the United States as a whole will Room D of the Michigan L
basis of the description. "There has to benefit from the bilingual approach." The last event of Puerto Rican
be something more than (the descrip- Despite the negative statistics, Orta will be a cultural night at the
lion)," he said. is optimistic. House on Washtenaw Ave. a
"We have to make things happen p.m. Saturday.
U alum. di scusses rol
of the Federal Reserve

SAID d
LSA-SG
turnoutv
BY DAVID SCHWARTZ apathetic
Results from this week's LSA turned ou
Student Government elections will Sopho
likely mandate a continuation of Jennifer
previous LSA-SG policies, as the president
dominant Students for Academic he plans
Institutional Development (SAID) tends to
party trounced the opposition, academi
winning a vast majority of seats for present p
the 11th consecutive year. SAID
According to figures obtained from prefer tol
LSA-SG election director Trisha Michiga
Drueke, the next government will concenti
include a SAID president and vice problems
president, while 12 of the 15 spots on Among t
the Executive Council will be filled slate, Bo
by SAID members. the regi
Every SAID candidate who ran for students.
a position was elected; two Boris
independents and one member of the favor of
Meadow Party were elected to the cultural d
three remaining council seats. class m
Drueke said 1,200 LSA students debated.
voted in the election. Although this is "I do
only 7.5 percent of the roughly necessari
16,000 LSA students, Drueke said the course,"h

The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 18, 1988 - Page 3
ominates

elections

"{

was average. "It's kind of
that less than a third even
it," she said.
imores David Boris and
Clough will be the next
and vice president. Boris said
to keep LSA-SG, which
divorce itself from non-
c student concerns, on its
ath.
candidates have said they
leave political debates to the
n Student Assembly, and
rate more on academic
within the college of LSA.
he major goals of the SAID
iris said, is improvement of
stration process for LSA
said the SAID party is in
a class either on racism or
diversity, but said making the
andatory was still being
n't know if we should
ily force students to take this
he said.

LSA-SG
Winners
President
David Boris SAID
Vice President
Jennifer Clough SAID
Executive Council
Jefferson Paul Ehrlich SAID
Dawn Emling SAID
Jason Frank Ind.
Susan Greenspan SAID
Danny Kaufman Meadow
Seth Meisler SAID
Brad Meltzer SAID
Stacia Sydney Smith SAID
Laurie Solow SAID
Sheryl Stone SAID
Stacy Temares SAID
Debbie Walters SAID
Deborah Wasserman SAID ,
Gary Weisserman Ind..
Kimberly White SAID

.V

V:

$.

tion
a.
"

Student says attack was raciall

BY NATHAN SMITH
A 21-year-old University student
said she filed a complaint with the
University Affirmative Action Office
after she was called a "slimy Arab"

e num- and thrown to the ground early Sun-
th. We day morning.
uage in The woman said she was walking
bound between South Quad and West Quad
with a 23-year-old graduate student
annual when two students approached them
by the and wanted to fight.

ground.
A fight broke out between the two
students and the graduate student, the
woman said. Several nearby police
officers saw the fight and arrested all
four students.
According to the police report, the
graduate student and one of the other
students were charged with disorderly
fighting; the woman was charged with
assaulting a police officer; and the
other student was charged with
hindering and opposing arrest.
The woman said she did not think
she had assaulted the police officer,
but according to the police report, she
jumped on the back of an officer and
hit him in the right eye. The officer

sustained minor swelling under the
eye, according to the report.
The woman, who is of Indian de-
scent, said she thinks the attack was
definitely a racial incident. "It's an at-
tack against all people of dark sking"
she said.
The woman said she filed an infor-
mal report with the Affirmative Ac-
tion office, and she did not know
whether any action would be taken
against the students. She added that
she would like to see the students do
service work for a minority organiza-
tion.
A spokesperson from the Affirma-
tive Action Office would not verify
that a report had been filed.

ciation.
itted to
derstadt
d no re-
it funds
dminis-
govern-
with the
n down
lack of
ate that
fficient
' said
Puerto
ues to-
Rivera-
.m. on
Econ-
derson
eague.
Week
Trotter
at 7:30
3k/

She said she turned to the two stu-
dents and explained that she and her
friend did not want to fight. She said
one of the men then told her to "get
out of the way, you slimy Arab," and
the other student pushed her to the

Mouthy Mort hits Motown

BY VINCE WILK
SPECIAL TO THE DAILY
DETROIT - Move over Martha
Raye, there's a new big mouth in
town.
Mouthy Morton Downey, Jr.
wrapped up his Motown appearances
yesterday at the newly renovated Or-
chestra Hall in downtown Detroit.
Two shows were taped, the first
dealing with labor unions and the
second with racism. They will air on
Thanksgiving, Nov. 24, and Nov.
25.
Downey's show usually is taped
in his New Jersey studio, but lately
he has been taping at sites across the
country. "We were invited," said Bill
Boggs, executive producer of the
show. "We had great success at the
Apollo theatre in Harlem, addressing
issues pertinent to New York, so we
are here to address issues pertinent to
Detroit."
From its first airing, the show has
been controversial. When asked about
the show's reputation for contro-
versy, Boggs said, "That's the way
it's supposed to be!" And many of
Downey's fans agree.
"He has the guts to stand up for
what he believes," said Todd
Michaels of Lake Orion, "This is
journalism at its finest."
Not everyone in attendance was a
"Mort maniac," however.
"I think he's one-sided and doesn't
allow people to point out their be-
liefs and reasons," said Kevin Bendi
of West Bloomfield.

Guests on Downey's show who
do not share his beliefs are usually
first blasted by Downey, and then fed
to the Beast - his pet name for the
raucous audience.
Controversial issues are
commonplace on the show. In the
episode to air Nov. 25, a group of
white-supremacist skinheads were
pitted against Detroit officials and
Roy Innis, chair of the Congress on
Racial Equality. After being raked
over the coals by Mort and the audi-
ence, the skinheads were forced to
leave in the middle of the show.
They exited amidst chanting, name-
calling and obscene gestures.
Downey seems to thrive on the
controversy. When asked to name the
most controversial topic he has en-

countered, he replied "Affirmative
Action, because it burns up people
on both sides. On one side, you get
people who shouldn't get a job, and
on the other, you get people who
thinks those others are stupid. But
they're not."
For now, his formula is working.
Boggs commented that "the ratings
are going through the roof." And
Mort mania seems to be on the rise?
if the standing-room-only crowd was
any evidence.

SY MONICA SMITH She discussed the board's makeup and
Americans don't know enough role with about 70 students and fac-
Obout how the Federal Reserve Sys- ulty members yesterday.
ten works, said University alum The system has a board of seven
Martha Seger, "probably because we governors - presidential appointees
Shve done such a good job of keeping who serve staggered 14-year terms.
everything secret." The Reserve System formulates and
Seger, who graduated from the executes U.S. monetary policy; over-
University with a master's degree in sees the 12 Federal Reserve Bank re-
finance and a doctorate in finance and gional branches; and regulates all
business economics is now a gover- bank holding companies.
nor of the Federal Reserve System. Supervision of banks is a day-to-

day operation, but the most difficult
task is making monetary policy that
will continue the economy's expan-
sion and prevent increased inflation.
"It's difficult to do monetary pol-
icy... because of the expansion we've
had in the last six years," Seger said.
"We want economic growth to con-
tinue, and we want the economy to
expand, but we have to be careful
about inflation."
Michigan Daily
ARTS
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I

Wayne County Executive Edward McNamara was mistakenly identified in a
Otory yesterday as a former Michigan governor. He was never governor.
It's Our Lucky 7th irthday
and' e'd Like to Say:
Thankjfou~loM#/
FOR THE PAST 7 YEARS YOU'VE MADE US ONE
OF YOUR FAVORITE CHINESE RESTAURANTS!
TO CELEBRATE OUR 7TH BIRTHDAY, WE'RE
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