100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 08, 1988 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 14 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 8, 1988
'U'-CITY INTERACTION

'U', city

share

1

BY LIZ ROHAN
It has been said that husbands and
wives begin to look alike after years
together. The same appears true for
the University and the town that
surrounds it; the University has
shaped the economy and values of
Ann Arbor for decades.
Ann Arbor has relied economi-
cally on the University since the
Civil War, said Jonathan Marwil, an
Ann Arbor historian. And the Uni-
versity has grown with the town.
"After every great war, the Univer-
sity goes through an automatic ex-
pansion and it doubles in enrollment.
When the student body expands,
obviously the town's economy
prospers," Marwil said.
GEORGE PERRIN, president
of the State Street Merchant's Asso-
'iation and owner of The Brown Jug
on South University, said he and
other Ann Arbor merchants depend
on the students. "When the students
leave we are slow," he said.
"The students make me money;
"sudents bring me here. The students
bring dollar signs to Ann Arbor,"
'kid Larry Lockhardt, a Cottage Inn
'employee.
The University itself contributes
to the city as the largest employer in
'Washtenaw County. The University
Medical Center alone employs 8,700
people.
:u MARWIL SAID Ann Arbor has
,been protected from serious eco-
nomic recessions because education
is a consistent industry. When D0-
7troit's economy slumps with auto-
- mobile sales, Ann Arbor's continues
o benefit from steady streams of
college students, Marwil said.
The city successfully weathered
the national recessions of the 1870s,
,the 1930s and the 1970s. And during
The Great Depression, unemploy-
-nent in Ann Arbor was about 12
percent - as compared to the na-
.tional average of 25 percent.
The University's concentration
on research also benefits the
economy of Ann Arbor, because
research-oriented businesses such as
Parke-Davis want to be located near
sites of scientific research. "(The
University) became a sort of magnet
for these businesses and it has
continued this way," Marwil said.
"THE UNIVERSITY has
shaped the town and is responsible
for the growth of our major indus-
tries in terms of jobs and real es-
Iki

tate," said Louisa Pieper, staff
director for the Ann Arbor Historic
Preservation Commission.
Marwil also credited the Univer-
sity with giving Ann Arbor a toler-
ance for differences and acceptance
of change.
"Alternative lifestyles are
accepted here. There is an
acceptance of interracial situations,"
said Pieper, adding that the town's
character is shaped by the
University.
Ann Arbor teenager Greg Hunt
said he sees this "college town" as a
place where people can pretty much
do what they want, where people
will listen to different points of
view. "It's a liberal town." he said.
AIMEE MCGOVERN, who
works at Hertler Brothers' hardware
store on South Ashley Street, said
she thinks the University helps make
Ann Arbor the best place to live in
lower Michigan. "It's comfortable
and non-judgmental," she said. "The
University is good for the town. We
get a nice mixture of people. The
graduates stay on and it's good for
the town."
Some Ann Arbor residents, how- Yzfn ,
ever, say the University ignores the .
problems of the community and that
the majority of students are apathetic , .
toward and unaware of the city's A
needs.
"Living in Ann Arbor you get
the sense that the University is a
very special place. (The University) LSA junior Niki Myers and.
raises the quality of life in the Interaction between Ann Ar
town," said Sue Budin, an Ann Ar-
bor resident. "But it's a fairy tale
place and people are insensitive to in the community for credit - said
problems of other parts of the coun- the people of Ann Arbor "have a lot
try - especially the inner cities," of appreciation and respect for the
she said. students." He thinks the relationship
A COORDINATOR for an Ann between the city and the University
Arbor neighborhood center, who is one of "mutual benefits."
wished to remain unnamed, said the "IT'S GREAT for the students
University co unity pays too to be of service, and it's great for the
much attention t he world outside contacts. The neighborhood centers,
Ann Arbor. schools and shelters we contact are
"The University is concerned very appreciative," he said.
with worldwide problems and does "Students are full of energy and a
not give too much energy or real desire to help."
commitment into their own Ann Arbor resident Colin John-
community," he said. "Our own son works at Ann Arbor's Ozone
backyard is overlooked for a larger House, a runaway youth and family
picture. Project Outreach is an counseling home. He agreed that
example of what the University students ought to realize "there is a
could do in large scale." whole community outside of the
University psychology Pro'U'."
Richard Mann, coordinator of "The University makes it a small
Project Outreach - a program town and big city at the same time. I
which allows students to volunteer
#HVM k 41 A4
K-kMUV *lFIA
Ekk-NCHr R.AWN AVA1VA4P

A
bo

t
t
t

t
c
1
1
l
l
i

nage, economy
x p~
KAREN HANDELA/DSy
nn AbrrsdnTo Keywrkath WidlrCmmnyBkey FurthzSt
spxU
~. 4'L5 u t e.
t 4~
don't have to go to Detroit to see the (D-3rd Ward) said it's hard to make citizens are not pleased with
same things," he said. a distinction between the Ann Arbor students but "particularly menacihg
THE LAST serious conflict be- community and the University be- comments" are rarely heard. "The
tween the University students and cause so many people in Ann Arbor relationship between the University
Ann Arbor citizens was in June, are a part of both. But some natural and the city of Ann Arbor hras
1969. On three successive nights, conflicts exist, she said. generally been very good," he said
thousands of students congregated "THE MAJOR conflict in the "THERE IS bound to be a love-
on South University to convince the community is that the University hate relationship. between the
city turn the street into a mall. doesn't provide enough (on-campus) University and the town in which ii
During the conflict, students blocked housing for the students," a fact sits," said Catherine Cureton, a Uni-
traffic and hurled stones at police, which exacerbates Ann Arbor's versity employee.
There were numerous arrests, but no housing shortage, she said. Most Ann Arbor citizens agree
one was killed, and there was little Beyond this issue, Brater said, the relationship between the city and
damage. there is constant friction in neigh- University is a trade-off. The
Marwil, a history professor, said borhoods surrounding the University University gives the city jobs, medi-
that conflict was not typical of the fraternity and sorority houses be- cal care, Big Ten sports, and culture
relationship between the students cause of the constant partying in - but takes away some 'of its
and the townspeople, just a these neighborhoods. "This makes housing, parking spaces, and
reflection of the turbulence between residents worried about the safety of sometimes, peace and quiet. Like a
generations during the years of the their children," she added. marriages, the University and An
Vietnam draft. Ann Arbor Mayor Gerald Arbor are bound together, for richer
City councilmember Liz Brater Jernigan said sometimes Ann Arbor or poorer, better or worse.
NOW PLAYING ON BROADWAY
-1151 Broadway-
FRIED * CHICKEN * HAMBURGERS
CHICKEN * SPARERIBS * HOAGIES
AND * FISH * SANDWICHES
BARBEQUE
Wekdays PMWE DELIVER ALL

11AM-Midnight OF ANN ARBOR
I ="1 Weekends ($5.00 minimum order)
YES! Send me Michigan's largest newspaper at BIG
SAVINGS. I have enclosed my check or money order
(made payable to The Detroit News) for:
1
El$15 Fall Term (15 weeks) 0 $15 Winter Term (15 weeks)
9/10 to 12/22/87 1/6 to 4/29/88
If
For more information call 973-7177.
1
Check or money order must be enclosed to begin delivery.
NAME PHONE
ADDRESS APT. OR ROOM
CITY ZIP
SUBSCRIBER SIGNATURE DATE

IN <ANPrO IN

74t-1J

r + w

SOnly per we

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan