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October 28, 1988 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-28

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 28, 1988 -Page 9

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Join together with the bands

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BY MARGIE HEINLEN
No, it's not a Battle of the Bands - you all know
how the University feels about violence at public
events. It's Band-O-Rama! OK, the O-Rama is a little
too mod, but don't be put off; these bands are cool.
What bands? The University Concert Band, the
Symphony Band, Northcoast (the School of Music's
Big Band/ Jazz ensemble), the Friars and, of course, the
famous Michigan Marching Band.
The Friars aren't really a band, but they are so-o-o-
o good. This eight man a capella crew sports a range
that can by turns shatter glass and melt hearts. A
'must-see' before graduation.
The term "band" breaks down into three categories
- the always popular Rock Band (Roll is a
subdivision), Marching Band and Concert Band.
"Concert Band," meaning the sitting variety, includes
Symphony, Big and sometimes Jazz. Conductor of the
Concert Band, Donald Schleicher, says "the Concert
Band is the least understood of the band categories. It is
the same as a traditional orchestra without the string
section." The musical range and magnitude is equal but
the sound is different.
Marilyn Breiter, promotions manager for the Music
School, characterizes band music as, "brighter sound-
ing." The "Rama" part means, "showcase of the differ-
ent types of band music and sections within the bands
themelves," said Breiter.
Northcoast is riding the wave of Jazz revival- all
the way to France, where they were invited to perform

at the Montreux Jazz festival in this coming summer.
Catch it.
For those of you who run off at halftime to buy
some more Budweiser or a stale, starchy pretzel to soak
up all the Budweiser already congealing in your tummy
from the first quarter and then run off again after the
game to your roommates' parents tailgate to sponge
some more Budweiser and pretzles - in the process
missing the Michigan Marching Band - here is your
chance to hear them at 120 decibels.
Many of the songs chosen for Band-o-rama are from
this year's half time show so this would be prime time
to catch up. "Temptation," "The Hawaiian Warchant,"
"The Yellow and Blue." You know these songs - the
ones alumnae, possibly parents and older siblings, hum
while strolling around the house when fall gets in the
air. John Williams, assistant to Michigan Marching
Band conductor Eric Becher, said "the visual excitement
and sheer dynamics of 250 musicians is unparalleled."
The Michigan band is nationally heralded for
excellence and preformance - and as one of the few
bands that is still 'high stepping'. This year's selec-
tions feature big band, jazz, and Broadway show tunes.
"There's a real camaraderie that is visible on stage,
which comes from hard work and precision," Williams
added, "the Marching Band maintains tradition on cam-
pus at the University." (And off; now you can even
hear that big band sound - well, at least a good
reproduction - on record and cassette.)
BAND-O-RAMA starts tonight at 7:30 p.m. Tickets
are $4, $5, and $6 at the Hill Auditorium Box Office,
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Going, going, gone

BY MARK SHAIMAN
IT'S a bird, it's a plane ... well, uh,
it was a plane. It was here just a
couple of seconds ago. It just, uh,
disappeared
And when David Copperfield
appears this Sunday at the Power
Center, this is just the kind of illus-
ion you can expect to see. Or not
see. There won't be a Learjet on (or
not on) the stage this weekend, but
the show will be just as mesmeriz-
ing.
In the past, Copperfield has per-
formed some incredible feats. Making
the jet disappear looks like a coin
trick in comparison to making the
Statue of Liberty vanish. And his
walk through the Great Wall of
China is nothing to skip over either.
His last triumph was to enter the
Bermuda Triangle, disappear, and
then return. That may not seem like
anything spectacular, but considering
that he came back with a ship that
disappeared in 1954, it is clear that
Copperfield knows his geometry.
Some film footage from this event
will be shown at the performance..
These illusions were all done for
television specials, but this magician

Copperfield
will amaze
the dickens
out of you
is best live, on stage. He has been
named Atlantic City's "Entertainer of
the Year" and has won similar honors
from the Anerican Guild of Variety
Artists and the Academy of Magical
Arts.
And seeing, especially for your-
self, is believing - at least that's
what they say. Still, you will have
trouble believing your eyes as David
escapes from numerous chains and
bindings before a giant saw gives
you twice the magician for your
money.
Even when he is whole, there is
more to Copperfield than can be seen
onstage. He has used his talents to do
more than please audiences through-
out the world. In 1982, he began
Project Magic, a means of helping to
rehabilitate the disabled by teaching
them magic. People who have found

an interest in learning tricks, which
naturally require manual dexterity,
have gone from rope tricks to tying
their own shoes. As Copperfield
says, "We've made the Statue of
Liberty disappear and walked through
the Great Wall of China, but that's
nothing compared to seeing people
who now have new lives."
And with the success of this
program, Copperfield was named the
National Spokesman for the United
States Disabled Sports Team at the
Paralympic Games in Seoul this
year. Through his illusionsvhe has
personally learned the value of
appearances in his magic, and their
lack of importance when it comes to
real people.
On Sunday, though, the man
behind the illusions will remain just
as much of a mystery as his magic
is. But with Halloween just around
the corner, a magic show is the place
to be, so get your tickets soon before
they all disappear, too.
DAVID COPPERFIELD will be
performing two shows on Sunday,
October 30, at the Power Center.
Times are 4 and 7 p.m. and tickets
are $17.50 and $13.50.

Bash
Continued from Page 8
composers of Stravinsky and Hinde-
mith.
However, Bernstein's interpre-
tation of Mahler has been noted by
critics to be his most extraordinary,
possibly because of their similarities.
Both were conductors who were men
of the theater; both conducted the
same orchestra with the similar
technique; both were composer-
conductors, and both were of Jewish
back-ground. So it's not surprising
that Bernstein was the first conductor
to record the complete Mahler
symphony cycle.
Along with his immense skill as
a conductor, Bernstein is well-known
as an innovative composer who has
created a wide range of forms and
styles: three symphonies; a Serenade
for Violin Solo, Strings, and
Percussion; Chichester Psalms for
chorus and orchestra; three ballets;
the score for the film On the
Waterfront ; and the operas Trouble
In Tahiti and A Quiet Place. For
Broadway theater, he has written On
the Town, Wonder Town, Candide,
and his greatest and most famous
stage work, West Side Story.
With all that Bernstein has
accomplished in career, Saturday
evening's gala concert will be an
opportunity to see one of America's

finest all-around musicians at work.
A second student ticket sale has been
announced for Saturday, October 29.
There is a very limited amount of
tickets available, and they will go on
sale at 9 a.m. at the box office in
Burton Bell Tower. Tickets are $10

each with a limit of two per person
with a valid student I.D. Seating is at
the discretion of the Musical Society.
WARNING: At the first ticket sale,
there were four people who camped
out for tickets and 250 in line at 9
a.m., so take all necessary
precautions.

LOVE TO DANCE?
University of Michigan
WOLVERETTES
Kickline

Mass Meeting:

Sunday, Oct. 30, 1988

Anderson Room, Michigan Unon

7 p.m.

Call: 665-0629

EARN $5.00 - $6.50/HOUR
PLUS BONUSES!
HELP RAISE MONEY FOR THE UNIVERSITY
BY CALLING MICHIGAN ALUMNI

Guitar
Continued from Page 8
His last two albums, Daring
Adventures (1986) and Amnesia, his
recent debut on Capitol, were
produced by the man who laid that
glossy coat of latex on Crowded
House, Mitchell Froom. While it's
easy to object to giving the same
treatment to a musician with the
range of Thompson (not to mention

dressing him up in a ridiculous jester
costume on the cover of Amnesia,)
be assured that in concert the man
will cut loose, rock out, crank up,
etc.
Loudon Wainwright III, a
folksinger with a twisted sense of
humor of his own, warms up for
Thompson, the man who produced
his last two records. He struts like a
rooster, he hangs his tongue out like
Michael Jordan, and he fantasizes
aloud about Suzanne Vega. Come in

time to hear pithy observations like
"Driving on acid is easy" and "Even
Bob Geldof looks like alarmingly

thin."
RICHARD THOMPSON will play
the Power Center at 8 p.m. Saturday.

Last Chance to Be Shot!

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Your Last Chance to get in the Yearbook
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