100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1988 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

al

ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Friday, October 28, 1988

Page 8

Fun with Dick and friends

Guitarist too good Clive,
for this world combi

Christine
classes

a
I

ne

BY MARK SWARTZ
H E's an electric guitarist of enormous imagination
and artistry. He's a songwriter with a unique vision of
the depths of rage and despair, as well as an ear for the
lighter side. His discography stretches back 20 years,
including two albums on Rolling Stone's top 100 list
of all time. The question you might be asking yourself
now is "Why haven't I heard of Richard Thompson
before?"
Good question. While he's no Gloria Estefan, most
of his work is at least as commercial as, say, Dire
Siraits or Van Morrison. The critics have heaped praise
on him since he first formed Fairport Convention in
1967, at the age of 17. Above all, his live perform-
ances are fearsome displays of instrumental prowess
and personal, direct expression.
The answer to why you haven't heard of Richard
Thompson is easy: We live in a bad world.
A forefather of so-called folk-rock (defined by Billy
kBragg last week at the Power Center as, "Bob Dylan
songs on an electric guitar,") Thompson's style has
always assimilated diverse ingredients of American and
British music into his own meaty, spicy goulash. He's
equally comfortable yodelling Hank William's "Honky
"Tonk Blues," grinding out a Cajun "Wooly Bully"
with Beausoleil, and crooning his native Celtic ballads.
His original compositions match these longstanding
musical traditions with a wholly modern, intelligent
outlook. Domestic strife, political unrest, urban vio-
lence, and most of all, death are common strains that
run through his albums. It's a morbid domain -
sometimes horrifying, like the wife-stalking husband
i the title track of 1982's Shoot Out the Lights. And
then it's all twisted by an ironic humor. "There's no-
thing at the end of the rainbow. There's nothing to
grow up for anymore," he laments, addressing an infant
who clearly has no idea what he's talking about. This
from a man whose best song, "Wall of Death," is
about a carnival. See Guitar, Page 9

ri V iii lV i

BY D. MARA LOWENSTEIN
SHE has a voice that sounds like a mixture of Stevie
Nicks, Alison Moyet, and Cher. He plays an awesome
acoustic guitar and sounds a bit like Michael Hedges.
Together they are a powerful musical force. Opening
for Richard Thompson, Clive Gregson and Christine
Collister will wow the Power Center Saturday night.
"We don't want to pigeon-hole ourselves, we play a.
bit of folk, rock 'n' roll, blues, R&B, and jazz," Clive
insists. Critical of artists who lump themselves into
categories or who allow others (music critics and the
like) to do the lumping for them, Clive and Christine
have made an extraordinary effort to keep their musical
options open.
Promoting their new album Mischief , the duo
stress that their live music is far different from their
studio sound. Live the duo perform acoustic sets,'
relying solely on their voices and Clive's guitar
virtuosity. Their studio sound is enhanced by the talent
of various other musicians, some collected from
Clive's previous band, Any Trouble, and some who are
simply friends from around town.
Their music is an eclectic collection of heart-
wrenching ballads and, albeit sometimes cynical,
country-folkish "fun" tunes. The transitions that the
duo uses exemplify fluidity; between songs, Clive
mixes anecdotal tales with riotous introductions. r
Civt ha b nn tho mnir crn fn niaO fix'

The Vienna Philharmonic shares in the celebration of Leonard Bernstein's 70th
birthday. Ann Arbor is only one of three American stops on the birthday tour.

Birthday

bash

Bernstein
BY ARI SCHNEIDER

parties with
included the first
Rosza. His emoti

%ve nas een o
years, starting hi
production of otherl
this dynamic duo.
club, and, finding
convinced her to fo
Clive and Christi
Richard Thompson1
in the performancef
What's the bes
perform? Because
probably the best si

an the musical scene tor quite a iewrgnlitrrt
4UwL . original interpret
s own band, moving onto the FOR most people who are celebrating their 70th music made Bernst
band's sounds, and finally, creating birthday, it is a time to slow down and enjoy their American music.
Clive "discovered" Christine in a retirement, but then again, Leonard Bernstein is not like In the years tha
her voice so incredibly moving, most people or like any person. Bernstein, who was American-born an
rm a partnership with him. born on August 25, 1918, is celebrating his birthday by prominent post of
ine are also crucial elements in the conducting the Vienna Philharmonic on its North Philharmonic in 1
band, so expect to see them rocking American tour. Besides Bernstein's incredible endurance, He has become on
following their own act. he is the only American musician to receive world - leading such o
t reason for coming to see them acclaim as a composer, pianist, author, and teacher. and the Vienna Pr
as Clive puts it ,"Christine is Bernstein first gained the public's notice on conducting a wid
nger you'll ever see." November 14, 1943. He debuted in his position as Romantic composi
Assistant Director of the New York Philharmonic when same brilliance t
he substituted for the ailing Bruno Walter on less than
24 hours notice in a nationally broadcast concert that
WIARD'S
T-SH R T HAUNTED BARN
PRINTING OPEN EVERY NIGHT THRU Oct.31
COTTON 7:00-10:00 pm
HANES BEEFY-T
&M
HEV. WT SWEATS
1002 PONTIAC TR.
994-1367
TakeWashtenawtor
Carpenter, south on
Carpenter 4 miles to Merritt
left on Merritt -1 1/2 miles -
482-7744 .

Philharmonic
performance of a work by Miklos
onal direction and his vibrant and
ations of both new and established
.ein's performance an historic event inr
t followed, Bernstein became the first
d trained conductor to be named to the
Musical Director of the New York
958 - a position he held until 1969
e of the few international conductors
rchestras as the Israel Philharmonic
hilharmonic - because he excels at
e range of styles. He conducts the
tions of Berlioz and Brahms with the
hat he conducts the 20th century
See Bash, Page 9

I
I

CAMPUS

1

R COORS LIGHT
N 1/4 BARRELS
$23.95
El
+Tax
+Deposit
-While supplies last
1665-4431

I.

d
I

III

' -. . . 1 4VP

a

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan