100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 4, 1988 - Page 3

19 faculty members get
awards at ceremony

BY KATEY FISCHER AND
ELIZABETH ROBBOY
Nineteen faculty members and re-
searchers received awards last night
for distinguished teaching, research,
and service during the State of the
University Address - while Tagar, a
pro-Israel student activist group,
peacefully protested an award pre-
sented to political science Prof. Ali
Mazrui.
About 400 people attended the
ceremony at Rackham Auditorium
while15 Tagar members distributed
pamplets outside. "He doesn't de-
serve the award because he's clearly
an anti-semite," said protester Marav
Barr, a first-year LSA student.
Distinguished Faculty Achieve-
ment Awards were presented to:
Marshall Becker, professor of health
behavior and education; Floyd Gray,
professor of French; Ali Mazrui,
professor of political science; Ray-

Pro-Israel
group protests
Mazrui award
mond Ruddon, Jr., professor and
chairman of the department of phar-
macology; and Edgar Westrum, Jr.,
professor of chemistry.
The Faculty Recognition Award
was given to: Walter Allen, associ-
ate professor of sociology and Afro-
American and African Studies; Ter-
rence McDonald, associate professor
of history; Margaret Cool Root, as-
sociate professor the history of art;
James Winn, professor of English;
and Richard Wrangham, associate
professor of anthropology and biol-
ogyThe Distinguished Faculty Gov-

ernance award was presented to Cecil
Nesbit, professor emeritus of math.
James Gindin, professor of English,
received the sole University of Press
Book Award of for the authorship of
John Galsworthy's Life and Art: An
Alien Fortress.
The Good Teaching Awards, made
possible by the Amoco Foundation,
were awared to four faculty: June
Howard, associate professor of En-
glish and women's studies; Richard
Lawton, professor of chemistry;
Louis Marinaro, assistant professor
of art; and Gregory Markus, profes-
sor of political science.
The University Research Scien-
titst Award went to James Ashton-
Miller, associate research scientist of
engineering. Huda Akil and Stanley
Watson, Jr., research scientists of
the Mental Health Research Insti- JOHN MUNSON/Daily
tute, received the Unviersity Senior English Prof. June Howard, center, is congratulated last night by SACUA Chair Beth Reed.
Research Scientist Lectureship Rackham Graduate School Dean John D'Arms, who presented awards to outstanding faculty
Award. members, is at left.

Native American£ s""
music prof. speaks

DSS director
named to panel

BY ANNA SENKEVITCH
Native Americans have updated
aspects of their culture while pre-
serving its spiritual underpin-
nings, and recently have moved to
regain parts of it they have lost,
said visiting professor of music
Charlotte Heth, a member of the
Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.
In her lecture to students and
faculty yesterday in a Burton
Memorial Tower classroom, Heth
focused on the perseverance of
American Indian heritage in spite
of U.S. government actions to re-
locate its people from aboriginal
and reservation lands to American
cities.
She also praised many Native
Americans' refusal to assimilate
to white American culture as a
significant victory over pervasive
racial stereotyping and backlash
movements against her race.
"A lot has changed," she said,
referring to the ways in which
some American Indians have
adapted their ceremonies for public
viewing by adding metal bells and

aluminum cans to costumes, as
well as wearing costumes of other
tribes at inter-tribal pow wows.
But as the culture has "not re-
mained static," Heth stressed, In-
dian Americans now are searching
to regain lost past.
She explained, for example,
that many people have been
searching for recordings made
decades ago of Native American
music in order to return the for-
gotten forms to the current soci-
ety. "There's a big renaissance,"
she said.
In addition to creating and di-
recting programs in American In-
dian studies at UCLA and Cornell
University, Heth has served on
numerous advisory committees for
Native American cultural
appreciation and preservation.
As one of seven visiting
scholars who are coming to the
University this year through the
King-Chavez-Parks program, she
will lecture in classes and meet
with students until tomorrow.

BY SHARON GRIMBERG
Darlys Vander Beek, Director of
Disabled Student Services (DSS) at
the University, was recently reap
pointed by Governor James Blan-
chard to the Commission on Handi-
capped concerns.
"The commission," said Vander
Beek, "wants to emphasize that.per-
sons with handicaps. make better
employees." Given the opportunity
to work, she said the handicapped are
more industrious than their able-
bodied colleagues.
October is National Handicapped
Month and kicked off in Lansing last
week with a show aims at demon-
strating how the workplace can be
adapted with small and inexpensive
innovations to the needs of the
handicapped. -
In the past, the 21-person com-
mission has led the fight for consti-
tutional protection of handicappers'
rights. Most recently, it forced
through Barrier Free Design Laws
that aim to make public facilities
more accessible to the disabled.
Vander Beek, vice chair of the
Commission's Education Employ-
ment Subcommittee, has been in-
volved with issues concerning the
handicapped since 1973.
Since her appointment by the
University in December 1986, inter-
preter, financial aid, housing, and
academic action services have ex-
panded with the establishment of a
handicapped awareness campaign.
Vander Beek attributes much of
the expansion to the support of Vice
president of Student Services Henry
Johnson and to the University's
generally receptive response to the
handicapped.

King-Chavez-Parks
with students and
yesterday at Burton

DAVID LUBLINER/Daily
Visiting Scholar Charlotte Heth talks
faculty about Native American music
Memorial Tower.

'The commission wants to
emphasize that persons
with handicaps make
better employees.'
- Dar Vander Beek,
DSS director
She estimated that seven percent
of the student body currently suffers
from some sort of physical or emo-
tional disability. While most deal
with their disabilities on their own,
an increasingly large number - 121
at present -- are turning to her office
for help.
Margie Minor, a University stu-
dent, volunteers for DSS. As a blind
student, she used the reader and li-
brary services for 10 years. "The
history of the office has been one of
neglect," she said, "but Darlys has
been very determined to have
changes made and she has been suc-
cessful."
Julie Biemat, secretary to Vander
Beek, said that DSS is sorely under-
staffed but added that working with
Vander Beek has been an invaluable
learning experience. "It's a great
job," she said. "I would encourage
anyone to come and work here."
Vander Beek formerly worked as
director of Disabled Student Services
at Hope College in Holland, Michi-
gan.

Council discusses

Maynard assaults

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ
The Ann Arbor City Council discussed last
night how to handle the increased number of
assaults on weekends near the Maynard and
Liberty intersection - but no concrete decisions
were made.
Councilmember Terry Martin (R-Second
Ward) said the situation at Maynard and Liberty
is "most volatile," and the problem might
escalate into a shooting similar to the one which
occurred at Stop-N-Go over the past weekend.
Martin's suggestion came after the general
manager of the Nectarine Ballroom, which is
THE LI
What's happening in Ann
Speakers Union 3rd f
School of Music Undergr
Curriculum - "Curriculum and Associati
the Inclusion of Materials on the magazine
Native American," Professor Michigan L

located near the Maynard and Liberty intersection,
urged the council to approve a "loitering and/or
curfew law" to keep juveniles off the streets late
at night.
Although an Ann Arbor law currently
prohibits loitering, Martin said the law is rarely
enforced. The law bans loitering "under circum-
stances that warrant alarm for the safety or health
of any person or property in the vicinity."
Other councilmembers opposed Martin's
suggestion of increased loitering enforcement. "I
am sure there are other ways of looking at this
question without including more vigorous
IST i I

methods of law enforcement," said Jeff Epton (D-
Third Ward).
In addition, Martin suggested implementing a
system by which complaints of police harass-
ment would be addressed by the council.
In other business, the council:
-unanimously adopted a development plan for
the North Main corridor which would, among
other things, provide more community access to
the Huron River;
-unanimously approved a resolution to
observe Mental Illness Awareness Week, which
runs from Oct. 2-8.

- ---I

Arbor today

floor Counseling Office
aduate English
on/YAWP
- 7:00 pm, 4th floor
Union

A SPECIAL INVITATION TO OUR
FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENTS:

James Standifer, 10:30 a.m.,
School of Music
Psych, Music , Teaching,
and Learning - "Vocal Style
and Pulsation In American Indian
Music," Prof. James Froseth,
1:30 p.m., School of Music
TARDAA - "Pressure Point",
"Fairly Secret Army", Room 296
Dennison, 8PM
Revolutionary History
Series- "Revolution Sweeps
Europe-1948" 7-8 pm, B118
MLB, Presented by SPARK, a
revolutionary communist
organization
Meetings
Happy Children's Home
Orphanage - Mass Meeting,
video and discussion, 7:oo p.m.,
Crowfoot Room, Michigan
Union. More info call 662-0368.
Muslim Student
Association - Coffee Hour,
12:30-1:30, Center Room, North
Camnus Commons.

German Club- Meeting, 25
Angell Hall, 6:15 pm
Society of Minority
Engineering Students-
General Meeting, 6:30-8 pm,
1500 EECS. Dinner will be
served.
U of M Fencing Club -
Mass Meeting 7:30 pm Hill
Coliseum
Tagar: Pro-Israel Activists
- Meeting.
Furthermore
"Design and Synthesis of
Low-Symmetry
Macromolecules" - Mr.
Jeffrey S. Moore of The
University of Illinois, Jointly
sponsered by Chemistry and
Macromolecular Research Center,
Chemistry Building room 1300,
4:00p.m.
University Symphony
Orchestra Concert - Hill
Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Career Planning and
D1..... 6 44 A __ #,

THE COMMITTEE FOR THE INAUGURATION
REQUESTS THE PLEASURE OF YOUR COMPANY
AT A RECEPTION INTRODUCING
PRESIDENT AND MRS. JAMES JOHNSON DUDERSTADT
ON THE OCCASION OF DR. DUDERSTADT'S
INAUGURATION AS ELEVENTH PRESIDENT OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6,1988
3:00 - 4:30 P.M.
IN THE LOBBY OF THE POWER CENTER
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan