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October 04, 1988 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-10-04

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4

'Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 4, 1988

Police Notes
Sexual Assault
An Ann Arbor woman was sexu-
ally assaulted at gunpoint Saturday
morning in her home in the 1000
block of Vaughn Street, Ann Arbor
police said yesterday.
Sgt. Jan Suomala said the man,
described by the victim as a 6 feet 2
inches with short hair, entered the
woman's home at gunpoint at about
8:30 a.m., sexually assaulted her, and
fled.
The victim was treated at the
University Medical Center, Suomala
said.
There are no suspects in the case
and an investigation is continuing,
he said.
Attempted Sexual
Assault
Ann Arbor police said they are
investigating an attempted sexual as-
sault which occurred in the 400 block
of Depot Street early Saturday morn-
ing.
Sgt. Jan Suomala said the victim,
a 17-year-old Ann Arbor woman, was
standing behind the Gandy Dancer
Restaurant, when she was approached
by a man who said he had a gun.
The man fled after the woman
called to a nearby jogger for help,
Suomala said. The woman described
the man as 20 to 30 years old, about
5 feet 11 inches tall, and 170 pounds,
Suomala said. There are no suspects
in the incident, he said.
Breaking and
Entering
Thieves reportedly broke into a
home in the 800 block of Tappan
Street Saturday and stole a wallet
with contents valued at $200, Ann
Arbor police said. Sgt. Jan Suomala
said entry into the home was appar-
ently gained by removing a screen
window.
By Nathan Smith

Space si
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE,
Calif. (AP) - The shuttle Discovery
returned to earth and was given a star-
spangled welcome by more than
400,000 people yesterday after a
mission that NASA called "an abso-
lutely stunning success."
"Discovery, welcome back," Mis-
sion Control told commander Fred-
erick Hauck as he guided the ship to
a picture-perfect landing after a four-
day, 1.6-million mile mission.
The national anthem was playing
as the white ship, with its stubby
Delta-shaped wings, leveled out and
rolled to a smooth stop on the center

iuttle lancd
line painted on the hard-packed sand
of this desert air base. It was pre-
cisely on time, at 12:37 p.m. EST.
The crowd cheered and waved
small American flags for the suc-
cessful completion of a mission that
ended the 32-month period in which
no NASA ship carried people into
space.
But shuttle chief Richard Truly
balked at a question that implied that
with the new success, the trauma of
the Challenger explosion had been
overcome.
"Even when we've flown a few
flights, we are not going to forget

Is safely
the Challenger accident," he said.
"For the people who work in the
program, that's going to be on their
minds for a long time."
Truly, a former astronaut, said
from cursory inspection the ship ap-
peared to have suffered little damage
from the rigors of launching and re-
turning through the atmosphere. A
few tiles suffered thumb-sized nicks,
he said.
"We saw no problems I'm aware
of in any system," said Arnold Ald-
rich, who is director of the shuttle
program.
For 55 minutes after landing, the
crew was occupied with flipping
switches and turning off systems
while ground crews moved up giant
vehicles to "safe" the vehicle and to
remove any residual toxic gases.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Soviet legislature selects
new president and premier
MOSCOW - Politburo member Vitaly Vorotnikov was moved to
the job of president of the Russian republic yesterday, culminating the
largest leadership shake-up in Mikhail Gorbachev's three and one-half
years in power.
At yesterday's meeting, the legislature of the Russian republic elected
Interior Minister Alexander Vlasov, the republic's new premier to replac
Vorotnikov. Vladimir Orlov retired and Vorotnikov was elected his suc-
cessor.
Gorbachev, who recommended the changes, benefits most: he was elec-
ted Soviet president by the Supreme Soviet parliament Saturday. He
replaces Andrei Gromyko, who retired.
Gorbachev has advocated a more powerful presidency than that of
Gromyko. His election Saturday gave him more power to exercise his
reform program.
League jeopardizes debate
Presidential candidates George Bush and Michael Dukakis hailed the
success of the Discovery space shuttle mission yesterday, while their top
campaign aides discussed how to salvage a second debate after the League
of Women Voters abruptly withdrew as sponsor.
Nancy Neuman, League president, said League officials objected to art
agreement reached between the two campaigns which covered all details of
the debate. The agreement covered such details as the makeup of the panel
of questioners, and the time the candidates would have for responses.
"We have no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking
of the American people," Neuman said.
George Bush welcomed the shuttle crew back to earth at Edwards Air
Force Base in California, while Dukakis held a rally in Hartford, Conn.
Supreme Court begins term
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court, beginning a new term:
yesterday, set the stage for an important church-state ruling in a Pitts-
burgh dispute over religious displays and expanded its study of drug
testing in the workplace.
The justices issued orders in some 1,000 cases as they returned to the:
bench after a three month recess. They agreed to grant full review to 20
cases.
Most significantly, the court said it will decide whether displays of a
Christmas nativity scene and a menorah, symbolizing the .ewish holiday
of Chanukah, should be allowed at two government buildings in
Pittsburgh.
In a separate action, the justices said they will decide whether a
railroad may require its employees to take routine drug tests.
Crude oil prices plummet
NEW YORK - Oil prices continued to drop yesterday, reaching near-
ly $13 a barrel, almost surpassing a low that has not been seen in two
years.
The November contract of West Texas Intermediate, the benchmark
U.S. crude which plunged 55 cents a barrel Friday, skidded another 31
cents to settle at $13.06 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.
Crude prices haven't closed this low since August 1986.
The price of crude has skidded $2 a barrel over the past five weeks.
But experts say consumers probably won't see declines in gasoline and
heating oil prices unless crude holds at these depressed levels for an
extended period.
While prices of gas at the pump are unlikely to drop, they may remain
stable in the face of inflation. Lower oil prices also could dereaseethe
rate of inflation.
EXTRASq
Texas state employes cross
line with call-in contest
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - State employees won't be dialing for dollars
any longer after their attempts to cash in on a $1,000 radio call-in contest:
brought the Capitol's telephone system to a crashing halt.
"We thought we had just had an equipment failure," said Carl String-
fellow, state director of telecommunications. "But the second time it
went down one of our employees suggested it was at the same time as

one of the radio contests."
Officials reset the phone system, which can handle about 2,000 calls at
one time, to prevent any calls to the radio call-in exchange after the ser-
vice was disrupted several times, Stringfellow said. "I guess the economy
is so bad in Texas that everybody is trying to get money...But you
shouldn't be using state phones to be calling on to radio contests."

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Warst hiantil
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the
University of Michigan. Subscription rates: January through April
- $15 in Ann Arbor, $22 outside the city. 1988 spring, summer,
and fall term rates not yet available.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the
National Student News Service.
Editor in Chief.............REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN ARTS STAFF: Marisa Anaya, Brian Berger, Shoals Durant,
Managing Editor.............MARTHA SEVETSON Michael Fischer Margie Heinlen Brian Jarvinen, Juliet
News Editor.......................................EVE BECKER James, Mike Rubin, Ari Schneider, Lauren Shapiro, Chuck
City Editor..............................MELISSA RAMSDELL Skarsaune, Mark Swartz, Marie Wesaw.
Features Editor..........................ELIZABETH ATKINS Photo Editors............KAREN HANDELMAN
University Editor.....................ANDREW MILLS JOHN MUNSON
NEWS STAFF. Victoria Bauer, Anna Bondoc, Maron PHOTO STAFF: Alexandra Brez, Jessica Greene, Ellen
Davis, Noah Finkel, Kelly Gafford, Donna Iadipaolo, Ed Levy; Robin Lanak, David Lubliner, Danny Stiebel, Lisa
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Eric Lemont, Rose Lightborm, Michael Lustig. Alyssa Weekend Editor..................STEPHEN GREGORY
Lustigman, Martin Ott, Lisa Pollak, Micah Sciunit, Jonathan Associate Weekend Editor ..............BRIAN BONET
Scott, Rachele Rosi, Anna Senkevitch, Noelle Shadwick, Business
Marina Swain, Lawrence Rosenberg, David Schwartz, Manager.................... ..............JEIN KIM
RyanTutakLisaWiner. Assistant Business Manager..................PAM
Opinion Page Editors ......JEFFREY RUTIHERFORD) BULLOCK ,
CALE SOUTHWORTH Display Sales Manager......................JACKIE MILLER
OPINION STAFF: Elizabeth Esch, Bill Gladstone, Amy Assistant Display Sales Manager...............Tamara
Harmon, I. Matthew Miller, Rebecca Novick, Marcia Christie
Ochoa, Henry Park, Sandra Steingraber, Rashid Taber. Special Sections Coordinator........LISA GEORGE
Sports Editor..............................JEFF .RUSH Classified Manager.........MEREDITH POLLACK

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DATE:
TIME:

Wednesday, October 5, 1988
6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Associate Sports Editors .............JULIE HOLLMAN
ADAM SCHEFTER,
ADAM SC HRAGER
PETE STEWNERT
DOUG .V OT AN

Assistant Classified Manager ......DAVID EDINGER
Finance Manager....... .........JODI FRIEND
Credit Manager.............................HYUN JOO OH

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