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September 26, 1988 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-26

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily -- Monday, September 26, 1988

Doctor
Doctor talks
of poor
conditions
Continued from Page 1
tors per year, now we produce 500
new doctors per year."
The main change though, and the
cause of overburdening of the
facilities, is the easy access of health
care to all the population. Before
the revolution, people, especially the
poor, were discouraged from visiting
doctors. Today, 60 percent of the
patients seen at Luna's hospital
come from the rural areas.

BUT THE war with the contras
has greatly hindered efforts to
improve Nicaraguan health care. "We
are afraid to go to certain areas for
fear of contra attacks," Luna said.
He said several clinics in small
towns have been sacked in contra
raids, and the war-caused isolation of
remote villages has increased
malnutrition, the source of most
ailments.
In addition, the war casualties -
civilians, contras, and government
soldiers - put a greater demand on
the hospital, often taking 40 to 50
beds each month at Luna's hospital.
With the bilateral cease-fire agreed
to in March, and the unilateral cease-
fire observed by the Sandinistas
since May, the number of casualties
has been significantly reduced; only
one to two beds each month are for
casualties now.
These casualties are mostly civil-
ians who have stepped on unex-
ploded grenades or landmines.

JESSICA GREENE/Dolly
Dr. Andrew Zwiefler, left, thanks Nicaraguan Dr. Javier
Luna, right, for his talk on September 22 about the hospital
he runs in Ann Arbor's sister city, Juigalpa. Standing at
middle is medical student and translator Gustava Del Toro.

Greeti
cards
braill4
KALAMAZOO (AP) - With
something as simple as a greeting
card. Truesillia Ruth Shank hopes to
help bridge the gap between the
worlds of the sighted and the blind.
"It seems so unfair that a blind
person should miss out on the sim-
ple, little pleasures of life," said Mrs.
Shank, sitting in the living room of
her modest home that doubles as the
office for her 7-month-old card com-
pany, Sucurre Greetings. Sucurre is
an Old French word meaning "to as-
sist."
"Can you imagine being 30, 40,
or 50 years old and having to wait for
someone to read a stack of Christmas.
cards to you? Or not being able to go
into a store and pick out an anniver-
sary card for your wife or a birthday
card for your child?" she asked.
The inspiration for Sucurre Greet-
ings, which Mrs. Shank owns with
her husband, came while she was
working on an advertising project
with a blind businessperson.
"He was doing things I couldn't
do even with my sight," she said. "It
just didn't seem right that he needed
someone to go to a store with him
just to pick out a card."

Pollack
Continued from Page 1
Pursell, a six-term Republican
member of Congress, never accepted
his invitation to the debate, spon-
sored by the Women's Action for
Nuclear Disarmament, member Ali-
son Hine said.
Pollack cited a newsletter called
Business Executives for National
Security in which a Defense De-
partment procurement director said
$30-45 billion is wasted each year.

The newsletter also said the Pen-
tagon's inspector general is investi-
gating over 300 fraud cases in 59 of
the Pentagon's 100 largest contrac-
tors.
Congress should "critically
evaluate and scrutinize everything
that comes before it," Pollack said,
endorsing three of the newsletter's
solutions to the Pentagon's pro-
curement problems: competitive
buying of equipment; testing equip-
ment before buying it; and impeding
potential conflict-of-interest
relationships.
Pollack also discussed economics

and her fears for the future. "The rich
have gotten richer, the poor have
gotten poorer, and the middle has
been squeezed," she said, questioning
whether today's young people will
be the first generation who will be
less well off than their parents.
"What has he accomplished?"
Pollack asked, referring to Pursell.
When her question was met with si-
lence, she said that silence, meaning
nothing, was the correct response.
"The greatest crime of any elected
official is silence," she then said,
adding that she learned to speak out,

question, and criticize silence during
her tenure on the Ann Arbor Board
of Education in the early 1980s.
She also poked at Pursell for flip-
flopping his position on some is-
sues, particularly aid to the
Nicaraguan contras, but lodged spe-
cific attacks at Pursell for at first
voting for two issues -- a bill to
provide funding to the Transporta-
tion Department and the Civil
Rights Restoration Act, passed ear-
lier this year - and then voting to
uphold a presidential veto of both
the bills.

S
ing
get
Because of the limited market,
Braille greeting cards have not been
manufactured by established card
companies, said Adam Ash, publis
er of the Gift Reporter, a trade publi-
cation for the gift industry. Some
rehabilitation agencies have been
known to sell some Braille cards at
Christmas, and others translate
greeting cards to Braille when re-
quested.
"At best, what you've been able
to get up until now is a card for a
sighted person that's been Brailled.,
These cards are designed specificall
for a visually impaired person, but
are still appealing to a sighted person
as well," said Paul Ponchillia, a pro-
fessor in the Department of Blind
Rehabilitation at Western Michigan
University.
Ponchillia, who is blind, helped
the Shanks design the cards.
The Shanks hope the pastel colors
and simple but elegant designs em-
bossed on the front of the cards wi
appeal to a wide audience. Underneath
the design is a description of the
object in Braille. Inside, Braille ap-
pears under the message.
ATE AND HILL
040
J EAT PIZZA
nd WEDNESDAY
7 5 6:00p.m. to 9:00p.m.
S1 Call 764-0557

? (

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

GET YOUR
FUTURE OFF
THE GROUND

-.
ORNER OF STA
994-4

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
*INTRAMURAL SOCCER SIGN-UPS
Tue., September 27 and Wed., September 28
11am - 4:30pm Intramural Sports Building
Play Begins: Sunday, October 2, 1988
*SOCCER OFFICIALS CLINIC
Monday, September 267pm
Intramural Sports Building

Imagine the thrill of fly-
ing a jet aircraft! Air Force
ROTC offers you leadership
training and an excellent start to a ca-
reer as an Air Force pilot. If you have what
it takes, check out Air Force ROTC today
Contact-
CAPT MIKE PHILLIPS
313-747-4093

C

*LAST
11AM

DAY TO SIGN-UP FOR TOUCH FOOTBALL
- 4:30pm Intramural Sports Building

ALL YOU CAN
Every TUESDAY a
CLSIFIED AD

*ESSENTIALS OF BACKPACKING CLINIC
Tuesday, September 27 7pm - 8:30pm
North Campus Recreation Building $5.00 Clinic Fee

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