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September 26, 1988 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-26

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 26, 1988 - Page 51

Interns r
summer
BY NOELLE SHAD WICK
Tensions were high on the fourth floor of Rackham
yesterday as one student after another remarked: "Do I
look nervous?" or "Oh no, I haven't read the speech
yet."
But Associate Dean James Jackson told them to re-
lax. "Think of this afternoon as a rare opportunity to
share the work which has been important to you and
your mentors," he said.
The students were gathered to share the results of
their summer internships as participants in the Sum-
mer Opportunity Research Program for minority stu-
dents.
The program, sponsored by the Rackham School of
Graduate Studies, hired 55 minority undergraduates to
develop research projects that were either original ideas
or part of an ongoing faculty research project.
The projects covered psychology, chemistry, his-
tory, and other disciplines. Much of the research com-
pleted by the interns will be part of the "mainstream"
research of the future, said Charles Moody, university
vice provost for minority affairs.
Some of the research was prompted by personal ex-
perience. Rubina Yeh, an art school junior, examined
the Asian-American woman's perception of the Ameri-

ecount
research
can beauty.
"When I was younger, I didn't see myself as beauti-
ful. I used to clip a clothespin to my nose for five
minutes every morning... because my nose would grow
narrow and have a bridge," she said. "As an art student,
I wanted to express my culture which hasn't been done
before."
Her project included many large paintings and
sketches of Asian-American woman doing unusual
things to make themselves beautiful.
The purpose of the program is to introduce minori-
ties to what research is like, Jackson said. "It's easy to
know what a doctor or dentist does, but what a profes-
sor does... well," he shrugged.
The program works, he said.
"It opened my eyes up; I'm now considering a joint
degree," said LSA junior Antoinette Hall.
The program has 250 students on 13 campuses, in-
cluding the 55 from the University. Rackham received
over 100 applications for the program.
To apply, students must submit a preliminary pro-
posal, then find a sponsoring professor. Sophomore
and junior minorities are eligible, and seniors are ac-
cepted under certain circumstances.

ALEXANDRA BREZ/Daily
Art School junior, Runia Yeh, explains how many Asian American women feel a need to
completely assimlilate into American culture. Yeh is standing in front of the artwork she
presented at the 3rd annual Summer Research Opportunity Program at Rackham yesterday.

'U' activist describes West Bank visit

BY SCOTT CHAPLIN
Robert Hauert, the religious
coordinator of the University's Of-
fice of Ethics and Religion, recently
visited the West Bank and the Gaza
Strip and spoke about his travels
Friday at the Guild House.
"The day after I arrived the whole
Gaza Strip was put on curfew,"
Hauert told about 30 people gathered
for a weekly brown-bag lecture se-
ries:
The Israeli Army is trying "to
c6n ol a population that they are
uname to control," he said. He listed
house destructions as well as labor
and curfew laws among other forms
of "collective punishment" that have
been used by the Israeli Government
against Palestinians in the region.
Israel has occupied the West Bank
and Gaza Strip since the 1967 war
with the United Arab Republic.
Hauert, a human rights activist,
lived for three weeks with Pales-
tinian families as part of a program
sponsored by the American Arab
Anti-Discrimination Committee.
The Israeli Army regularly im-

poses 24-hour curfews for entire
refugee camps and in many cases
they have shut off water, electricity,
phones, and food supplies, Hauert
said. He added that the Israeli Army
shoots tear gas - which has been
suspected of causing miscarriages in
women, among other things - into
private homes, clinics, and Mosques.
Palestinians are being forced out
of the territories, said Mayada
Shafie, an advisor to the Palestinian
Aid Society at Michigan State Uni-
versity, who attended the talk. The
Palestinians want to co-exist; they
want their own state, flag, and
political representatives as well as
the chance to build their own econ-
omy and infrastructure, she said.
Benjamin Ben-Baruch, co-chair of
the Middle East committee of the
Ann Arbor chapter of the New Jew-
ish Agenda said that "the Israeli
Government's Policies (in the occu-
pied zones) are in opposition to
democratic, humanitarian, and Jew-
ish values. The collective punish-
ments and population transfers are in
violation of international law and are

in no way justifiable."
He added, "as a Jew I have strong
emotional feelings towards Israel. I
am pro-Israel - the New Jewish
Agenda is pro-Israel - but because

we are pro-Israel, we feel we have to
speak out against the present trends
in Israeli society. The trends are
damaging to the center of the Jewish
religion and therefore damaging to
all Jews."

Episcopalians elect

first woml
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The
Rev. Barbara Harris, elected the first
woman bishop in the Anglican
Communion's 450-year history, said
yesterday her elevation is the latest
step in a movement to bring the
church into the mainstream.
Harris, a former public relations
executive, was elected Saturday to
the position of suffragan, or
assistant, bishop for the eastern
Massachusetts diocese of the
Episcopal Church. The diocese,

an bishop
wihincludes Boston, is the
nation's largest in both geography
and population.
"A fresh wind is blowing across
this church of ours," she said in her
first sermon at Philadelphia's
Church of the Advocate since her
election.
Several elections earlier this year
show the church is changing, said
Harris, who is Black. Two Black
priests were elected coadjutor
bishops, who are first in line to
succeed their presiding bishops.

Fam ily visit Associated Press
An Iraq i prisoner-of-war-holds his daughter while being
reunited with family members in a POW camp in Tehran
yesterday.
'Thwusands of tites both classic and current
Publicity stiffs, lobby cards, movie memorabilia

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pricing requires a valid, current term, UM ID card.

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September 26 - 30

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