100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Speech
assails
South
Africa
BY PAUL DE ROOIJ
Apartheid is immoral and we
should get rid of it, an Ayn Rand
Institute associate told students and
members of the Ann Arbor
community at Angell Hall last
night. But the alternative, the
African National Congress program,
is even worse, he said.
The only acceptable alternative
for Paul Schwartz, who was brought
to campus by the Students of
Objectivism, is one which fosters
"freedom" - and freedom to
objectivists means an extreme
implementation of laissez-faire
capitalism.
Schwartz started his speech by
briefly condemning South Africa for
the repressive situation and the
violence perpetrated by the state
against its people. But he directed
most of his criticism against Soviet
oppression and American liberals.
"The Soviet Union is more
repressive than South Africa," he
said. "So why do we use different
standards when talking about the
atter?"
The earth's worst evil is the
Soviet Union, he said, and the
emphasis on South Africa is
missplaced. He blamed the liberals
for accepting the situation in the
Soviet Union and clamoring for
change in South Africa. In addition,
he blamed American liberals for
implementing "racist" policies such
4s welfare programs in the United
States.
Pressed to offer a solution to the
situation in South Africa, Schwartz
said, "We should not talk about
power-sharing, but to obtain
unrestricted laissez faire capitalism."
Majority rule, he said, "did not
guarantee individual rights."
Schwartz acknowledged that only
a small minority in South Africa has
proposed a similar program. The
prospects for any meaningful change
are not good, he said. "It is a choice
between moderate collectivists or
brutal collectivists," he said.
The question-and-answer session
following his speech generated a
heated debate.
David Colbert, an LSA junior,
said after the debate, "If he intended
to talk about the Soviet Union, it
should have been billed as a talk
about the Soviet Union, and I
wouldn't have to hear it."
; But the audience seemed to be
evenly divided between those
accepting the position of the speaker
and those critical of it. He seemed to
generate no converts, however.

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 21, 1988 - Page 3
Argument
stalls MSA

meeti
BY KRISTINE LALONDE
Debate over a resolution to send
$5,000 to Jamaica for hurricane re-
lief dissolved into an exchange of
personal attacks at last night's
Michigan Student Assembly meet-
ing, but the assembly regrouped
quickly to adopt an amended version
of the proposal.
School of Social Work Rep. and
graduate student William Holmes
and President Michael Phillips, an
LSA senior, exchanged heated accu-
sations after Phillips spoke against
adoption of Holmes' resolution.
The resolution called for MSA to
donate $5,000 to the Jamaican Hur-
ricane Relief Effort of Washtenaw
County. The charity organization is
helping to relieve the Hurricane
Gilbert's destruction of Jamaica.
Phillips and other representatives
spoke against the resolution on the
grounds that MSA does not give
money directly to charity, but in-
stead assists fundraising organiza-
tions. This type of donation requires
far less expense, representatives said.
The amended version, which
passed 7-0 with six abstentions, en-,
couraged financial assistance if the
county organization plans a
fundraiser.
After Phillips spoke, Holmes ac-a

ng
cused him of failing to further the
cause of Blacks. Phillips responded
with anger, and both began making
personal attacks. MSA Vice Presi-
dent Susan Overdorf's pleas for order
were ignored until several other rep-
resentatives echoed her demands.
In response to the outburst,
Phillips said, "I'm sick and tired of
Blacks and women on this campus
making unfactuated comments...
People take things and blow them
out of proportion."
Phillips said Holmes was over-
reacting to the opposition to his
resolution rather than making a sub-
stantiated argument against
(Phillips') actions.
Holmes stood behind his accusa-
tions saying, "His accomplishments
only pertain to people outside (the
Black community)." He said he be-
lieved Phillips' opposition to the
University's anti-harassment policy
and deputization was racist.
LSA Rep. Rob Bell, a junior,
said of the exchange, "These kinds of
outbursts are understandable when
we're in a situation where we decide
conflict resolutions. Nevertheless,,.it
does not help the meetings progres
any." Bell cited the recent "conflict
management" workshops held at
MSA as a possible solution to such
problems.

ROBIN LOZNAK/Daily

Outdoor pulpit
Diag preacher Cliffe Knechtle speaks
invited to speak at the University by

to about 100 people on the Diag. Knechtle was
the Intra-Varsity Christian Fellowship.

MIRLYN debuts at 'U'

BY LISA POLLAK
The shiny new computer, face blank, sat on a table
in the Graduate Library reference room. More than 200
people - carrying balloons, sipping white wine, eat-
ing crackers and green dip - stared at it curiously. A
few spilled crumbs on it. A tall man wearing a suit cut
the ribbon off its keyboard. The man tried to use the
computer, but it didn't work.
The man was University President James Duder-
stadt. The computer - which he didn't know how to
operate - was MIRLYN, the library's new $2.6 mil-
lion card catalog. The event was a MIRLYN dedication
party. And the food was delicious.
If MIRLYN could talk, it might have wondered
what yesterday's fuss was about. After all, new
University acronyms are about as common as new
University computers. And just who calls the caterer,
MIRLYN might have wondered, for a computer -
even if it is one of nearly 100 new machines on cam-
pus.
BUT UNIVERSITY librarians and administra-
tors, who could talk, said MIRLYN's inception war-
rants celebration.
"It's probably one of the most important events in
the library in decades. It will dramatically change the
use of the library," said library spokesperson Chris
Mclntrye.
All right, MIRLYN might have thought, I under-

stand. But what about the buttons, balloons, visors,
adhesive-backed note pads, even plastic bags inscribed
with my name. The giant banners. The thousands of
fliers. Why am I worth it?
"It's the first step towards getting library resources
closer to students," said Bob Houbeck, director of li-
brary serials and acquisitions. In fact, by 1991, MIR-
LYN will have entirely replaced the University's card
catalogs, making books, journals, periodicals, and cir-
culation information available within seconds.
"MIRLYN will allow us," Duderstadt said, "to col-
laborate, cooperate, and communicate."
THE KEY word there, MIRLYN might have
added, was just plain "ate" - which most of yester-
day's guests, including party crashers like law student
Chris Brock, did eagerly.
"Stress the food," Brock said, grabbing a pastry, "It
was great."
If MIRLYN could talk, it might have wondered why
library officials yesterday allowed pate, but usually re-
strict potato chips. It might have wondered who made
up its acronym (MIchigan Research LibrarY Net-
work) and why.
But the truth is, MIRLYN can talk. And yesterday,
after the party was over, this is what it said: NO EN-
TRIES FOUND.
But no one was listening.

Computer virus

spreader
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) -
A former programmer has been con-
victed of planting a computer "virus"
in his employer's system that wiped
out 168,000 records and was acti-
vated like a time bomb, doing its.
damage two days after he was fired.
Tarrant County Assistant District
Attorney Davis McCown said he
believes he is the first prosecutor in
the country to have someone con-
victed for destroying computer
records using a "virus."
"We've had people stealing
through computers, but not this type
of case," McCown said. "The basis
for this offense is deletion."
"It's very rare that the people who
spread the viruses are caught," said

convicted
John McAfee, chair of the Computer
Virus Industry Association in Santa
Clara, Calif., which helps educate
the public about viruses and find:
ways to fight them.
"This is absolutely the first time"
for a conviction, McAfee said.
"In the past, prosecutors have
stayed away from this kind of case
because they're too hard to prove,"
McCown said yesterday. "They have
also been'reluctant because the vic-
tim doesn't want to let anyone know
there has been a breach of security."
Donald Burleson was convicted
Monday of charges of harmful access
to a computer, a third-degree felony
that carries up to 10 years in prison
and up to $5,000 in fines.

Mich. bill to fight prejudice
against N.Ireland Catholics

HEALTH & FITNESS

i

LANSING (AP) - The state
House Judiciary Committee passed a
bill yesterday that would allow
Michigan to use the voting power of
its pension fund stocks to fight dis-
crimination against Roman
Catholics in Northern Ireland.
The legislation, which passed the
committee 14-1, would require the

state to use the voting strength of its
pension fund to urge U.S. compa-
nies with operations in Northern
Ireland to live up to a set of anti-
discrimination guidelines known as
the MacBride Principles.

"This is not a divestiture bill,
this is not a bill which would mean
the state of Michigan would incur
any financial losses," said Sen. John
Kelly (D-Grosse Pointe Woods),
sponsor of the measure.

JUST A SHORT WALK
FROM CENTRAL CAMPUS

JI

THE

LIST

What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Speakers
Henry N. Pollack - "The
Earth as a Thermal Engine,"
Rackham Amphitheatre, 8 pm.
Inagural Lecture of the Turner
Lecture Series. Sponsored by the
Geology Department.
Teodor Shanin - "The
Question of Socialism and
Gorbachev's Political Universe."
Aud C, Angell Hall, 8 pm.
Organic Chemistry Seminar
- Introduction to Research
Programs in Organic Chemsitry.
Presentations by Profs. Ashe,
Coward, Ege, Knochel, and
Townsend. Chemistry Building,
Rm. 1300, 4 pm.
Brown Bag Lecture - Center
for Russian and East European
Studies. Graduate students recount
summer experiences in the Soviet
Union and Eastern Europe. Lane
Hall Commons Room, Noon.
Meetings

1161 for more info.
Holden Village Vespers -
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, 9 pm. Call 663-5560.
Furthermore

Recreational Sports
* TOUCH FOOTBALL OFFICIALS NEEDED *
WE TRAIN WE PAY $4.60/HOUR
YOU CAN SET YOUR WORK HOURS
TO MEET YOUR SCHEDULE!
FOR INFORMATION, CALL MOBY BENEDICT 763-3562

-
"

Nautilus * Raquetball cou
Two Pools " Dance studios
Gymnasium * Excercise bikes
CONVENIENT MONTHI
OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK!7

irts " Free Weights
" Fitness Testing
* Qualified instructors
LY MEMBERSHIPS-
7$2
350 S. Fifth Ave.
663-0536

i

t i

Introduction t
Career Planning
Office, 3200 SAB,

to
and
2:30

CP&P -
Placement.
- 3 pm.

Arlo Guthrie - Rare solo
appearance. At The Ark, 8
Tickets: $15. Call 763-TKTS.

club
pm.

Ann Arbor
Court Club
STUDENT PROGRAMS AVAILABLE

Pre-Interview - With Arthur
Andersen, 1303 EECS, 5:15 - 7:15
pm. Sponsored by Society of
Women Engineers.
Fall Reception - UM Students
of Objectivism. Pond Room,
Michigan Union, 8 pm.nFree.
Star Trax - Record your own
vocals over background music -
free! Mountain Jacks, Stadium and
Maple, 8:30 pm - 12:30 am.

4'0.
p- (

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

r
f .
A

24 HOUR
FITNESS!
(Avoid the crowds at the CCRB)

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
*IM CROSS COUNTRY MEET ENTRIES DUE:

* AEROBICS* RACQUETBALL* NAUTILUS

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan