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March 23, 1988 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-23

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 23, 1988

4

Campaign
Continued from Page 1
- STILL, THE most important
part of their job is putting together a
crowd of people to attend the event.
It is vital that clips on the evening
news show a large and enthusiastic
group of supporters hanging on the
candidate's every word.
Lenny Wiles, organizer of Jack
Kemp's advance staff, said, "If there's
10,000 seats in an arena, and 9,999
are filled - that's a failure."
Wiles, who worked advance for
Ronald Reagan's presidential
campaigns in 1976, 1980 and 1984,
said the advance person is responsible
for everything from building the
stage to choosing the route the
candidate will take from the airport to
the event.
"When the candidate steps off the
plane it better all be perfect, or else
it's your fault. You've got to go out,
even if it's at 2 a.m., and drive the
Toute so if the driver doesn't know
where he's going, you do."
N-O O N E Y agreed, "You
reconfirm everything, you try to
anticipate everything that can go
wrong."
Still, inevitably, there are snafus.
Wiles said the hardest thing to
coordinate is a balloon drop. Once, at
a dinner he organized for Kemp, the
net holding hundreds of red, white,
and blue balloons got tangled up.
"You know how they're supposed to
float down - these dumped on one
small table of people, burying them
under 200 balloons."

calls, he arranged for Dukakis to tour
an abandoned 'crack' house with
Detroit Mayor Coleman Young
earlier this month. The morning of
the event he received a call from the
mayor's office cancelling the tour.
Left with just hours to organize an
alternative, he arranged a press
conference at a Detroit hotel. He
admitted "it gets tough sometimes
but it would be tough to walk away
from.,
WILES, WHO is 40 and claims
to have been "everywhere, at least
twice", quit advance work in 1984.
Working advance on Reagan's
reelection bid, he was taken hostage;
at a golf course in Augusta, Georgia
where the President was speaking.
The North Carolina native explained,
"A guy decided he wanted to talk to
the President. He took a whole group
of us. He was a southern boy and I
was a southern boy, so he thought{
we had something in common. He
let the others go and kept me."
Wiles managed to escape, but he
and his wife agreed that advance work
was too dangerous. Also, he said, it's
a job for the young, "Your legs can't'
take the long days and the nights in
the bars and all. You loose the killer
instinct. I'm getting too old to do
advance." He paused thoughtfully for'
a moment, then admitted "if I hadn't
fallen in love and gotten married, I
would be right out there in the heat
of the battle again."
Nooney, who has spent the last
six months on the road, said the
work can get tiring. He said "It gets
tough at times when you're by
yourself and you don't have much
support in an area. It can get lonely
at times, but not discouraging. For
an advance man you don't get a
chance to get discouraged, you're
always moving on to the next place.
You can't let it get you down, there's
too much to do."

Profile
Continued from Page 1
time now. I have to be," he laughed.
"I don't procrastinate as much as I
used to."
When he's not at Eclipse, Kauf-
man likes to sail and was a member
of the University's sailing team last
year.
"ECLIPSE CAN be time con-
suming. I'm really sorry that I had to
give (sailing) up; it was a lot of fun,
but I found that I didn't have enough
time to do that and Eclipse too," he
said.
Eclipse Jazz Radio Promotion
Coordinator Tamar Charney, an LSA
junior concentrating in psychology,
described Kaufman as a "good per-
son."
"You know that he really cares
about what he's doing and about
Eclipse and jazz. He gives 190 per-
cent to the organization," she said.
KAUFMAN said working with
volunteers is sometimes difficult be-
cause they do not get paid for their
work: "The only reasoning they have
for doing it is because they feel
strongly about the organization. I end
up doing a lot of cheerleading," he
said.
Kaufman described Eclipse volun-
teers as dedicated and unique people
who "want something more out of

life than just going to school and
leaving."
"'Eclipse' members want to be
involved in something and make
things happen," he said.
Rachel Clark, a member of the
Eclipse Research and Development
staff and a Residential College
sophomore studying psychology,
said Eclipse workers are "dedicated to
the music."
MOST OF the musicians enjoy
playing with Eclipse because it dif-
fers from the average promoter -
who Kaufman said "are only inter-
ested in making a buck. Eclipse is
very nice to the musician and we go
out of our way to get them exactly
what they want."
Kaufman - who wants to pursue
a career in concert promotion after he
graduates - summarized Eclipse Jazz
as a mutually beneficial relationship
between the organization and its vol-
unteers: "Eclipse can't survive with-
out the volunteers, and the volun-
teers, I think, have a certain need for
Eclipse."
In the future, Eclipse Jazz mem-
bers hope to expand to other college
campuses and increase media expo-
sure.
The organization is funded
through grants from National En-
dowment for the Arts, the Michigan
Council for the Arts, Arts Midwest
and the University of Michigan
School of Music.

Paven faced a different
problem. After numerous

sort of
phone

HEALTH & FITNESS

Congress
Continued from Page 1
agencies, and some corporations that
receive any federal aid. That means if
a college physics department, for ex-
ample, receives federal assistance, the
entire college would fall under the
civil rights laws.
Reagan and his congressional al-
lies argued for a less sweeping alter-
FULL PRIVILEGE
ADULT NAUTILUS
CLUB MEMBERSHIPS
JUST $25.00
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ANN ARBOR'Y'
350 S. FIFTH AVE.
663-0536

native, saying the act went far be-
yond simple restoration. They said it
would curtail religious liberty and
expand federal control over the pri-
vate sector.
Supporters in the House erupted
into cheers and applause when the
two-thirds mark was reached. In the
Senate, the mood was more subdued.

Search

Continued from Page 1
dent by September," said Dave New-
blatt, chair of the student advisory
committee. "It would be nice to have
one in the summer, but I don't think
that's going to happen."
Considering Abortion?
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Completely Confidential
Pregnancy Counseling Center
529 N. Hewitt, Ypsilanti
Call: 434-3088 (any time)
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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Satellite links U.S.-Moscow
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State George Shultz and Soviet For-
eign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze held a "businesslike, straight-forward,
constructive" session yesterday on nuclear arms control and human rights.
They also opened a satellite link with Moscow to reduce the risk of acci-
dental war.
Shultz extended the talks into the evening, treating Shevardnadze to a
buffet of hot dogs, hamburgers, and potato salad and arranged for "That's
Entertainment" to be shown.
Schultz has been pressing the Soviets to relax their emigration restric-
tions and liberalize cultural and religious practices. The Soviets, on the
other hand, have made a point of the homeless problem in the United
States.
Stamps to cost 25 cents April 3
WASHINGTON - Higher postage rates, including a 25-cent charge
for first-class letters, will take effect April 3, the Postal Service
announced yesterday.
"The Postal Service has been managing the costs of operating a
growing universal delivery system and moving a volume of mail that has
nearly doubled" to more than 160 billion pieces this year, said John
Griesemer, chair of the Postal Service Board of Governors.
Asked at a news conference when rates might increase again, Griesemer
would way only, "Our job is to fight against that."
The board set the effective date for the sweeping series of new rates,
recommended by the independent Postal Rate Commission on March 4
following10 months of study and hearings. Rates were last changed in
February 1985.
Sandinistas, Contras agree on
major points in truce talks
SAPOA, Nicaragua - Nicaragua's defense minister, Gen. Humberto
Ortega, said at the end of a second day of peace talks between Sandinista
and Contra rebel negotiators that he expected a "concrete agreement"
today.
The three days of meetings began Monday at this town on the Costa
Rican border, in which leaders are trying to end a civil war that President
Daniel Ortega says has cost 26,500 lives since 1981. Both sides
suspended battlefield action during the talks.
General Ortega and his Sandinista delegation proposed a 30-day truce
that could be extended to three months, during which the U.S.-supported
Contras would lay down their weapons and join a "national reconciliation
dialogue."
Strikers oppose Noriega offer
PANAMA CITY, Panama - Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega's oppo-
nents-scorned what they called a cynical offer to negotiate his resignation
and kept Panama shutdown yesterday with a general strike intended to
force him out.
An estimated 90 percent of offices and industries were shut by the
strike, which appeared to be gaining support on its second day. Most
shops and stores were closed, public transportation was halted, and many
government employees did not go to work.
Panama is out of cash because of pressure from the United States to
force the ouster of Noriega, who is the real power in Panama as
commander of its 15,000 soldiers and police. The U.S. dollar is the na-
tional currency and the supply has been cut off.
EXTRAS
California kid tastes flight-
trailing the tail of her kite
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - Little DeAndra Andrig was flying her
kite when it suddenly started to fly her, her parents say. It was just a short
hop, but one the 8-year-old isn't likely to forget.
A twin-engine plane caught the 200-pound nylon test line of
DeAndra's kite and carried her about 100 feet - over her daddy's head and
almost into a tree, she said yesterday.
"She said it was just a big jerk that lifted her into the air," said
DeAndra's mother, Debby. "It carried her right over my husband's head.
All he saw was a shadow going over his head. I'm just thankful she let
go."

"We always said, Hold on tight. Don't let go, honey,"' the mother
said, recalling their advice on proper kite-flying technique.
DeAndra said she was doing just that, until she saw what was looming
in front of her: "I thought that I was gonna hit a tree."
The plane, meanwhile, is grounded because of damage apparently
caused by getting tangled in the kite string.
Iffyou see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
Vol. XCVIII - No. 116
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms by studen s at the
University of Michigan. Subscription rates: January through April
- $15 in Ann Arbor, $22 outside the city. 1988 spring, summer,
and fall term rates not yet available.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the
National Student News Service.
Editor in Chief...................REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN Collins, Michael Fischer, Robert Flaggert, Andrea Gacki,
Managing Editor.......................MARTHA SEVETSON Timothy Huet, Juliet James, Brian Jarvinen, Avra
News Editor ....................EVE BECKER Kuffnan, Preeti Malani, David Peltz, Mike Rubin, Mark+
City Editor ...........................MELISSA BIRKS Shaiman,t
Features Editor..........................ELIZABETH ATKINS Todd Shanker, Lauren Shapiro, Chuck Skarsaune, Mark
University Editor..........................KERY MURAKAMI Swartz, Marc S. Taras, Marie Wesaw.
NEWS STAFF: Vicki Bauer, Anna Borgman, Dov Cohen, Photo Editors..........................KAREN HANDELMAN
Ken Dintzer, Sheala Durant, Steve Knopper, Theresa Lai, JOHN MUNSON
Kristine LaLonde, Eric Lemont, Michael Lustig, Alyssa PHOTO STAFF: Alexandra Brez, Jessica Greene, Ellen,
Lustigman, Dayna Lynn, Andrew Mills, Peter Mooney, Levy, Robin Loznak, David Lubliner, Danny Stiebel, Lisa,
Lisa Pollak, Jim Poniewozik, Aaron Robinson, Elissa Sard, Wax.
Micah Schmit, Elizabeth Stuppler, Marina Swain, Melissa Weekend Editors.......................STEPHEN GREGORY
Ramsdell, Lawrence Rosenberg, David Schwartz, Ryan ALAN PAUL
Tutak, Lisa Winer. WEEKEND STAFF: Fred Zinn.
Opinion Page Editors.............JEFFREY RUTHERFORD Display Sales Manager..........................ANNE
CALE SOUTHWORTH KUBEK
OPINION STAFF. Con Accibal, Muzammil Ahmed, Sarah Assistant Display Sales Manager......KAREN BROWN
Babb, Rosemary Chinnock, Brian Debrox, Betsy Esch, DISPLAY SALES STAFF: David Bauman, Gail Belenson.,
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Semenuk, Sandra Steingraber, Mark Williams. Matt Lane, Heather MacLachlan, Jodi Manchik, Eddy Meng,
Sports Editor .........................................JEFF Jackie Miller, Shelly Pleva, Debbie Retzky, Jim Ryan, Laura
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Associate Sports Editors.........JULIE HOLLMAN Cassie Vogel, Bruce Weiss.
ADAM SCHIEFITER NATIONALS: Valerie Breier
ADAM SCHRAGER LAYOUT: Heather Barbar,.
PETE STEINERT TEARDOWN: Tara Fortx.
DOUGVOLAN Finance Manager.............................ERIC
'SPORTS STAFF!. AAam Rns m_ Stev.e R...ndA..er_ Stave POM RANT

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OPen U Yde!

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Happening

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March 26
9am to 4pm
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The University
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For more info call
764-1516 between 9-11:30am
and 1-4pm, or simply walk-in
the day of the event

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