100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 10, 1988 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 10, 1988

Daily Photo by KENNETH DINTZ
Michael Dukakis speaks to supporters at a campaign breakfast in Des Moines, Monday. Dukakis finished third
in the Iowa caucuses behind Richard Gephardt and Paul Simon but predicted he would carry New Hampshire
next Tuesday, saying, "I think after New Hampshire the field will be narrower and we will be the frontrun-
ner."

Delegates
help to
d t
choose
candidates
(Continued from Page .)
The group moved on to discuss
the precinct's platform. Here all six
were in agreement in their dislike for
President Ronald Reagan. "He don't
give a damn about the midwest -
he thinks food is something you buy
in the grocery store. They're break-
ing (the small farmer) up a bit at a
time," Gary Read said.
The group's platform included a
Right-to-life provision, and a de-
mand for a cure to the foreign trade
imbalance. Mary Bartelt, speaking
on behalf of a clause demanding a
balanced budget, said "you've got to
be sensible, you can't keep going to
the store and buying, buying, buy-
ing. . . you can't buy Co-Co Puffs
if you can't afford them."
The members of this caucus have
a precarious relationship with the
federal government. While corn sub-
sidies are needed to make their farms
profitable, the government places
conditions on the money that are of-
ten demanding and, they said, occa-
sionally ridiculous.
Gary looked for sense in a law
that requires him to carry a quarter in
his first aid kit - to make a phone
call should he have an accident on
his tractor. His fields are six miles
from the nearest telephone. "I can't
decide which quarter of my land to
put the pay phone in, I don't know
where I' m going to have the acci-
dent," he said.
After the laughter passed the
group quickly finished up their
work, the Bartelts had to pay a
babysitter to get away for the cau-
cus, and they needed to get home.
Mary explained why attending the
caucus was important to her, saying
"you feel as if you don't count any-
way, but you hope somehow you
will."

Dole, Gephardt s
By The Associated Press
Republican Sen. Bob Dole and Democratic Rep.
Ricard Gephardt blew into New Hampshire yesterday,
two Midwesterners angling to turn their first-place
Iowa caucus finishes to advantage in next week's lead-
offpresidential primary elections.
Vice-president George Bush, the national front-
runner humbled by a third-place finish, redoubled his
campaign efforts and requisitioned one of Dole's cam-
paign themes. "I'm one of you," he told New Hamp-
shire voters.
-But Pat Robertson, Iowa's surprise Republican run-
ner-up said the vice president's "myth of invincibility"
was gone. Another rival forecast Bush's swift political
demise; despite the vice president's lead in New
Hamtpshire polls.
Unlike Dole, Gephardt notched only a narrow win in
Iowa. He immediately declared himself the "clear
underdog" in the state and pronounced Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis the Democrat to beat.
IEven so, he said, "I'm gonna do fine."
-Sen. Paul Simon, runner-up among the Democrats
in Iowa, also pegged Dukakis the man to beat, and
said, "The important thing is who comes in second."

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Waldheim report spurs debate
VIENNA - Claims that an investigative panel found President Kurt
Waldheim innocent of war crimes "stand in starkest contrast to our
findings," a commission member said yesterday. After the report was
presented to him Monday, Waldheim said it cleared him and made clear he
would not resign. Some newspapers proclaimed him innocent.
The international panel of six historians declared in the report that
Waldheim was in "direct proximity to criminal actions" during his World
War II service as a German army lieutenant in the Balkans.
They said Waldheim knew of Nazi atrocities and did nothing to stop
them. The 202-page document said the investigators found no proof that
he was guilty of war crimes, but were leaving the question of guilt open.
At a 90 minute news conference by panel members yesterday, Yehuda
Wallach of Israel and Manfred Messerschmidt of West Germany defended
the report against conservative attacks and disputed Walheim'a contention
that he was cleared.
Official says Panama general
involved in drug trafficking
WASHINGTON - A former associate portrayed Panamanian general
Manuel Antonio Noriega yesterday as the driving force behind a "gigantic
machine" that generated hundreds of millions of dollars through drug
trafficking, money laundering, gunrunning and other criminal enterprises.
Jose Blandon, a former Panamanian intelligence official fired by
General Noriega as his country's counsel general in New York, said also
Cuban President Fidel Castro once personally intervened in a dispute be-
tween Noreiga and the Medellin drug cartel in Columbia.
One cocaine shipment by an alleged Noriega associate involved an ap-
parent connection to the U.S.-backed Contra rebels in Nicaragua, Blandon
told a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee.
Gov. may reinstate MLK day
PHOENIX - Acting Gov. Rose Mofford's call for reinstating a
Martin Luther King holiday drew a partisan reaction from legislators
yesterday, with Republicans calling it a "divisive" reminder of the
problems facing impeached Gov. Evan Mecham.
One of Mecham's first moves after taking office last year was to
rescind former Gov. Bruce Babbit's order for a holiday honoring the slain
civil rights leader, to be observed by all executive branch workers.
Mecheam rescinded Babbit's executive order in January 1977,
contending it was illegal. He also said he did not believe King deserved a
holiday, creating a storm of controversy.
Months later, he declared a civil rights day to fall on the Sunday before
the Monday holiday for King that is observed in about half of the states.
Mofford, who like Babbitt is a Democrat, said Monday a King holiday
would be a major priority. Mecham is a Republican.
Gas tax hits local governments
WASHINGTON - Congress' war on tax cheats is producing some
innocent casualties: state and local governments that may be forced to cut
services in order to pay a federal tax on gasoline.
The gas tax will be refunded by the federal government but no one is
sure how long that will take. In the meantime, states, cities and counties
will lose the use of the tax money.
State and local governments were caught in the net that Congress
threw out in an effort to halt cheating on the 9.1-cent-a-gallon gasoline
tax. Lawmakers found oil-industry interinediaries often were buying tax-
free gasoline at wholesale under a false claim that it would be taxed when
resold.

I

4

I

.4

I

!ek victor in N.H.
Dukakis predicted he would carry the state next
Tuesday but neither he nor his aides wanted to predict a
margin. "I think after New Hampshire the field will be
narrower and we will be the front-runner," he said in an
interview.
He added, "I think it's going to be more aggressive,
only because the field now is going to begin to
narrow."
There was no disagreement on that point.
Traditionally, the first primary is also the last for many
of the also-rans.
And with only a week until the election, Iowa's
winners scarcely had time to savor their success before
flying halfway across the country.
Dole attributed his easy Iowa win to sticking to the
issues and holding onto his temper in the face of
provocations from Bush's campaign aides.
But he said he faces an uphill battle against the vice
president in New Hampshire. "Let's face it, I'm
behind," he said. "I'm not the front-runner in New
Hampshire."
The Senate Republican leader said he still viewed
the campaign as a two-man race between himself and
the vice president, Robertson's surprising finish aside.

,a'

1f4

9

Iowans debate national issues during caucuses

4

4 By MARINA SWAIN
Special to the Daily
IOWA CITY, Iowa - Monday's Iowa caucus,
the first stepping stone in the 1988 presidential
election, culminated over a year of grassroots
c mpaigning in the midwest.
Since the Iowa caucus traditionally has a great
impact upon the election prospects for each
candidate, every trend or turning point along the
Iowa campaign trail has attracted national
attention.
But state residents, many of whom contribute
tine and money to the campaigns, appear to be
more concerned with the candidates than the
national limelight.
TAKE THE residents of Victor, Iowa - a
farming town of 1,092. The town became the
hub of the county, as township representatives
attended the caucuses. The Democrats gathered at
the Knights of Columbus Hall, while the
Republicans met at the firehouse to discuss

issues and candidates - generating ideas which
will be passed on to the state and national
conventions.
Dole supporter Kent Tibben said, "I like Dole
because his roots are in the agricultural
community and he has a strong pro-life stance,
which, to me, is very important."
The grassroots democracy and ardent
campaigning was also apparent at the larger Des
Moines political rallies.
Marty Meehan, a supporter of Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis, traveled from
Massachussets to support his candidate.
"Basically, I'm out here at my own expense," he
said. "(Dukakis) is a Democrat who can win -
that's important."
HARRY JENSEN, of Des Moines, is
more interested in the qualifications of the
candidates than his chances of getting elected.
"I'm an old fashioned Democrat - taking care of
the sick and the oppressed as opposed to spending

billions on armaments," he said. "(Illinois Sen.
Paul) Simon has been in the legislature long
enough to know all the problems."
Even Gary Hart, last in the polls, maintained
a group of Iowa followers. Joe Rodecap of Des
Moines said, "He's down for the working class
people."
Former televison evangelist Pat Robertson
supporter Vicki McMillan of Illinois wants
Robertson to be elected, "mostly for the moral
issues. We need a conservative foundation."
JESSE JACKSON, the other reverend
running for office had a smallibut loyal
following. "I've supported him since 1984.
Jackson is going to help everyone - white, red,
and black through the rainbow coalition, said
Edward Beechum of Des Moines. "And he's
going to help the farmers too."
-Daily staffer Alan Paul contributed to this
story.

EXTRAS

Y

HEALTH & FITNESS

ConsideringAbortion?
Free Pregnancy Test
Completely Confidential
Pregnancy Counseling Center
529 N. Hewitt, Ypsilanti
Call: 434-3088 (any time)

UM News in
The Daily
764-0552

MINORITY & INTERNATIONAL
STUDENT GROUP
. WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES WITH STUDENTS
FROM OTHER PARTS OF THE COUNTRY OR THE WORLD?
" ARE YOU FEELING BOTH SATISFIED BUT BEWILDERED ABOUT
COLLEGE LIFE?
" STILL FIGURING OUT NEW FRIENDS AND ROOMMATES?
" ARE YOU WONDERING HOW YOU REMAIN YOU AND STILL FIT IN?
" TRYING TO DECIDE HOW TO BALANCE YOUR SCHOOL WORK AND
SOCIAL LIFE?
A group for minority and international men and women will begin February, 1988.
Students will have the opportunity to meet others and share their thoughts and
experiences about life at The University of Michigan. The Group will run from four
to five weeks. Blanca Charriez, the group facilitator, would like to talk briefly by
phone or in person with interested students prior to first meeting. Please call
Blanca at 764-8312.

Texas town dubs itself 'Lea
Year capital of the World'
ANTHONY, Texas (AP) - New Orleans is famous for reveling
during Mardi Gras and Boston is acclaimed for its St. Patrick's Day
celebrations. Now, the town of Anthony would like to be known for
living it up on Leap Year day.
Anthony, which straddles the Texas-New Mexico border 15 miles
north of El Paso, already bills itself "The Best Little Town in Two
States."
Now, the town has proclaimed itself the "Leap Year Capital of the
World," and plans to sponsor a Worldwide Leap Year Birthday Club and
hold a quadrennial celebration.
Mary Ann Brown, who was born Feb. 29, 1932, said town leaders
seized the opportunity whien they had the chance. Brown said she knows
two other Leap Year day babies in town, which seemed like reason
enough to claim the title.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
V01. XCVIII-No.'91
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday
through Friday during the f all and winter terms by students at the
University of Michigan. Subscription rates: January through April
- $15 in Ann Arbor, $22 outside the city. 1988 spring, summer,
and fall term rates not yet available.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the
National Student News Service.
Editor in Chie........ REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN.Todd Shanker, Lauren Shapiro, Chuck Skarsaune, Mark
Mnagws Editor .....................RHEVETECKE Swartz, Marc S. Taras.
NewsEdtor.............................VEB RPhoto Editors............KAREN HANDELMAN
City Editor ...........................MELISSA BIRKSJONM SN
F h~o MEL AATJOHN MUNSON
Features Editor ..................ELIZABETH ATKINS
University Editor ... .........KERY MURAKAMI PHOTO STAFF: Alexandra Brez, Jessica Greene, Ellen
NEWS STAFF: Vicki Bauer, Dov Cohen, Hampton Lvy Robin Loznak, David Lubliner, Danny Stiebel, Lisa
Dellinger, Ken Dintzer, Sheala Durant, Heather Eurich, Wax.
Steve Knopper, Kristine LaLonde, Michael Lustig, Alyssa Weekend Editors.....................STEPHEN GREGORY
Lustigmoan, Andrew Mills, Peter Mooney, Lisa Pollak, JimAANPU
Poniewozik, Micah Schmit, Melissa Ramsdell, David ALANFredAiUL
WEEKEND STAFF: Fred Zinn.
Schwartz, Steve Tuch, Ryan Tutak, Rose Mary Wummnel. DipaSleMngr......... ..AN
Opinion Page Editors..JEFFREY RUTHERFORD Dipay Sales Manager............. ...ANNE
CALE OUTHWRTIIAssistant Display Sales Manager..KAREN BROWN
OPINION STAFF: Muzammil Amed, Sarah Babb, DISPLAY SALES STAFF: David Bauman, Gail Belenson,
Rosemary Chinnock, Molly Daggett, Noah Finkel, Jim Lauren Berman, Sherri Blansky, Pam Bullock, Jeff Chen,
Herron, Eric L. Holt, Joshua Ray Levin, L Matthew Miller, Tammy Christie, Milton Feld, Lisa George, Michelle Gill.
Steve Semenuk, Mark Weisbrot, Mark Williams. Matt Lane, Heather MacLachlan, Jodi Manchik, Eddy Meng,
Sports Editor ..............................JEFF RUSH Jackie Miller, Sheilly Pleva, Debbie Retzky, Jim Ryan, Laura
Associate Sports Editors .............JULIE HOLLMAN Schlanger. Michelle Slavik, Mary Snyder, Marie Soma,
AAA SC EFI'E Cassre Vogel. Bruce Weiss.
ADAM $CHRAGER NATIONALS: Valerie Bmr
PETE STEINERT LAYOUT: Heather Barbar,.
DOUG VOLAN TEARDOWN: Tara Porton.
SPORTS STAFF: Adam Benson, Steve Blondr, Steve Finance Manager....................ERIC
Cohen, Richard Eisen, Lisa Gilbert, Mike Gill, Steve Ginna N
Kenneth Goldberg, Bob Green, David Hymans. Lori Assistant Finance Manager ............LISA DEV OS
Knapp, Taylor Lincoln, Kristin Matthews, Greg Molzon. FINA~,N C TAFRian RD..,., fl.,... Kim.4. 1....

4

WHAT DAY?
WHAT TIME?
STARTING
DATE?

Wednesdays
3:00 - 4:30 PM
Tentatively to Begin February 10
Led by: Blanca Charrez, ACSW

" .i._

JUST A SHORT WALK FROM
CENTRAL CAMPUS

What's
- Happening
Recreational Sports
. INTRAMURAL MINI SOCCER MANAGER'S MTG.
WED., FEBRUARY 10 6:00 pm

r
r

4

I ML

'd

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan