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April 20, 1988 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-20

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, April 20, 1988

Inmate wins Hopwood

By LIZ ROHAN
Susan Fair, who won a Hopwood
Award for her short story, "The
Visit," thought attending the awards
ceremony yesterday wasn't worth it.
And for good reason.
Fair, an inmate at Florence Crane
prison in Coldwater, Michigan,
wpuld have had to pay two security
guards $500 in overtime t o
accompany her to the ceremony.
Instead, she received $1,200, as well
as the prestige associated with the
highest literary award given by the
University, for her fictional piece
about prison life.
Fair, a senior at the University,
receives instruction with the help of
several University faculty members
who recruit students to tape lectures
and gather notes for her.
ALTHOUGH FAIR could not
leave prison the Rackham Student
Government and the Coalition for A
New Domestic Policy held a press
conference in her name after the
ceremony. There, speakers talked
about the dehumanizing conditions

'Susan's story is an example of an individual's attempt
to overcome this oppression.'
- Political Science Prof. Alfred Meyer

award
Hopwood, up to a million dollars
have been awarded to talented
writers. This year $28,400 dollars
was awarded to the 31 winners.
There is both a major and a minor
contest with categories in drama,
screenplay, essay novel, short story
and poetry.
THE HIGHEST winner of this
year's awards is Residential College
senior Laura Gladhill, who won
$2,000 for two short stories which
demonstrated "particular
achievement."
Gladhill, a Russian studies major,
says her prize-winning stories are
emphasizes the difference between
Eastern and Western attitudes. "I
write from a Western point of view,"
she says.

which prisoners suffer in the state's
criminal justice system.
Prisoners in Michigan are denied
their right to privacy by law, which
robs them of their dignity and
individuality, said Fair's academic
counselor, Political Science Prof.
Alfred Meyer at the conference.
"Susan's story is an example of an
individual's attempt to overcome
this oppression," he said.
Those Hopwood winners who did
attend last night's ceremony at
Rackham Auditorium were honored
by poet Donald Justice, winner of
the 1980 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry.
JUSTICE WAS introduced by
Hopwood Chairman Prof. John
Aldridge as a poet who has "a
romantic and Wordsworthian view of

the past." He entertained the audience
with his speech, "About the Prose
Sublime."
Justice said prose has special
qualities apart from poetry and
defined it as "a frozen picture which
represents complex meaning and
feeling." He read prose passages by
Sherwood Anderson to the audience
to emphasize his theme
He concluded his speech with his
poetic claim that poetry and prose is
the means with which we see
"momentarily into the heart of
things. Such is the power derived
from a lifetime of reading and
writing.
Since the Hopwood Awards' were
established over fifty years ago by
Broadway playwright Avery

Both stories
American visiting

deal with an
the Soviet Union.

The Hopwood winning works
were judged locally by several
University professors, and nationally
by 10 prestigious writers, such as
poet Marge Piercy.

HEALTH & FITNESS
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HA VE AN ENJOYABLE SUMMER!

2 voting machines
erred int city election

By LISA POLLAK
The discovery of two defective
voting machines in the April 4 city
elections will not change the results
of those elections, City Clerk
Winifred Northcross said yesterday.
The city's other 219 machines will
not be examined for flaws, she said.
Voting machines at the East Quad
(Ward 3, Precinct 2) and Thurston
School (Ward 2, Precinct 11) voting
sites failed to correctly register votes
for Proposal C - the rent control
ordinance. Only 39 "yes" votes were
recorded at East Quad; only 19 "no"
votes were recorded at Thurston
school, Northcross said.
"What this means is that voters
who came in to vote on the ma-
chines involved after the numbers at
that point did not, in effect, vote on
Proposal C," Northcross wrote in an
April 18 memorandum.
Because Proposal C lost by more
than 8,000 votes, the errors at the
two affected precincts would not
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have affected the election's outcome,
she said.
There is "a small possibility" that
other machines malfunctioned,
Northcross said, "but there is noth-
ing we can do about it at this point.
The official recount date has passed."
The city has no way to know
how many votes were lost, she said,
adding that she is confident the elec-
tion results are accurate.
"It is obvious, however, that if
the determination had been closer,
these two machine malfunctions
could have made a crucial difference
in the results. We were extremely
lucky," her memorandum said.
City officials were prompted to
check the two defective machines
after finding discrepancies in the
voting results at those precincts, said
Herb Katz, director of election re-
cruiting the the city clerk's office.
At the East Quad site, for exam-
ple, Democratic candidate Liz Brater
beat Republican Isaac-Jacobein
Campbell, 145-45, but Proposal C
lost, 92-86.
"The vote should have been
stronger for rent control," Katz said.
Northcross plans to resume the
battle for an alternative voting sys-
tem that she abandoned in June,
1985, when she failed to convince
the city council that the machines
are obsolete, frequently in need of
repair, and inconvenient to store and
move.
Considering Abortion?
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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
French detect 3 mines in gulf
MANAMA, Bahrain - A French warship spotted three mines and
Iranian speedboats raided two tankers yesterday, the day after battles in the
southern Persian Gulf in which Iran fired missiles from shore at U.S.
Navy vessels.
A marine executive said the gulf appeared "ghostly" from lack of ship-
ping. He and others said commercial vessels were avoiding the waterway,
where Iran and Iraq have been at war since September 1980 and the U.S.
Navy sank or damaged six Iranian vessels Monday.
They also said the United States had suspended escorts of Kuwaiti oil
tankers temporarily, but Defense Department spokesperson Dan Howard
denied it.
Iran claimed its speedboats in the southern gulf sank an "American
naval logistical ship," killing its crew, an hour after Navy ships destroyed
two Iranian oil platforms Monday.
Israel deports 8 Palestinians
JERUSALEM - Israel yesterday deported eight more Palestinians to
Lebanon, including six involved in a stoning attack on a group of teen-
age Israeli hikers in a West Bank village, the army said.
Army officials said for the first time that the April 6 attack on the
hikers had been planned in advance by some of those who were deported
and alleged they belonged to an outlawed PLO youth group.
Also yesterday, Ezer Weizman, a Cabinet minister without portfolio,
criticized the slaying of PLO military commander Khalil al-Wazir, warn-
ing it would backfire on Israel. The army censored a newspaper editorial
that sought to criticize Israel's reported role in the killing.
The army reported relative clam elsewhere, although troops remained
on alert for possible attacks.
Kuwaiti royalty radios plea
ALGIERS, Algeria - A relative of the emir of Kuwait said yesterday
she and the other hostages aboard a hijacked Kuwaiti jetliner "are all in
danger" if her royal kin did not meet the demands of the Shiite Moslem
terrorists.
The plea from Anware Al-Sabah, the second in as many days from a
member of the royal family aboard the plane, came as the ordeal entered
its third week with no outward sign of progress.
"We want you to tell our families that my sister and I and all the pas-
sengers are well, although our morale is low and Fadel is naturally deteri-
orating," she said via radio in a tense but firm voice, referring to her
brother, Fadel Khaled Al-Sabah and her 22-year-old sister, Ibtesam.
The hijackers, thought to number eight, have killed two hostages since
the plane was hijacked April 5 on a flight from Bangkok to Kuwait with
112 people aboard.
Iacocca' s earnings irk UAW
HIGHLAND PARK, Mich. - Lee Iacocca, the nation's top-paid ex-
ecutive in 1986, earned nearly $18 million last year in salary, cash, and
stock bonuses and exercised stock options, Chrysler Corp. reported yes-
terday.
Iacocca's 1987 earnings of $17. million included nearly $13.5 mil-
lion by exercising stock options granted earlier in the decade, when
Chrysler's stock was worth a fraction of its present value.
Iacocca also received $765,890 in salary, $725,00 in cash bonuses,
$249,000 in stock bonuses and a stock grant worth nearly $2.7 million
when it was issued Dec. 8. The figures were contained in Chrysler's
proxy statement, mailed yesterday to stockholders.
United Auto Workers Vice President Mark Stepp, who leads the unit
which opened national contract talks with Chrysler on Monday, called the
payments "an incredible rip-off'.
EXTRAS
Stop the presses! The Daily
takes its two-week vacationI
Yes, we've got those one-week extensions on our last few papers, and
we even borrowed notes for our classes which we've missed for the past
several weeks.
We didn't think it was true either, but now that classes are over and
final exams are beginning, even Daily editors and staffers will be
making their way to campus libraries and computing centers - if we
can remember where they are.
Today marks our last day of publication for the term. But The Daily
will be back before you even begin thinking of that summer tan.
Our Summer Weekly paper begins May 6, and will come out every
Friday through Spring and Summer terms (If you are interested in'

working on the Daily this Spring/Summer, call us at 764-0552, or
show up May 1. at 7:00 p.m. for our first staff meeting).
Good luck on finals!
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
Vol. XCVIII - go. 136
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the
University of Michigan. Subscription rates for May through August
- $6 in Ann Arbor; $8 outside the city. The Michigan Daily is a
member of The Associated Press and the National Student News
Service.

4

4

i

FLEXIBLE EVENING HOURS
at Michigan Telefund
allow Andy Stenzler time to:
- study for his engineering degree
- act as social chairman of
his fraternity
. earnrmoneyforafun
summer vacation

Editor in Chief..................REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
Managing Editor........................MARTHA SEVETSON
News Editor.......................................EVE BECKER
City Editor.....................................MELISSA BIRKS
Features Editor..........................ELIZABETH ATKINS
University Editor..........................KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS STAFF: vicki Bauer, Anna Borgman, Dov Cohen,
Steve Knopper, Theresa Lai, Kristine LaLonde, Eric
Lemont, Michael Lustig, Alyssa Lustigman, Dayna Lynn,
Andrew Mills, Peter Mooney, Jim Poniewozik, Liz Rohan,
Micah Schmit, Elizabeth Stuppler, Marina Swain, Melissa
Ramsdell, Lawrence Rosenberg, David Schwartz, Ryan
Tutak, Lisa Winer, Veronica Woolridge.
Opinion Page Editors.............JEFFREY RUTHERFORD
CALE SOUTHWORTH
OPINION STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed, Sarah Babb,
Rosemary Chinnock, Brian DeBroux, Betsy Esch, Noah
Finkel, Joshua Ray Levin, I. Matthew Miller, Sandra
Steingraber, Mark Williams, Andrea immerman.
Sports Editor.........................................JEFF
RUSH
Associate Sports Editors...................JULIE HOLLMAN
ADAM SCHEFTER
ADAM SCH RAGER
PETE STEINERT
DOUG VOLAN 1

ARTS STAFF: VJ. Beauchamp, Cherie Curry, Michael.
Fischer, Andrea Gacki, Lynn Gettleman, Timothy Huet,
'Juliet James, Brian Jarvinen, Avra Kouffman, Preeti
Malani, Mike Rubin, Mark Shaiman, Todd Shanker, Lauren
Shapiro, Chuck Skarsaune, Mark Swartz, Marc S. Taras,
Marie Wesaw.
Photo Editors..........................KAREN HANDELMAN
JOHN MUNSON
PHOTO STAFF: Alexandra Brez, Jessica Greene, Ellen
Levy, Robin Loznak, David Lubliner, Danny Stiebel, Lisa
Wax.
Weekend Editors.......................STEPHEN GREGORY
ALAN PAUL
WEEKEND STAFF: Fred Zinn.
Display Sales Manager.........................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Display Sales Manager...........KAREN BROWN
DISPLAY SALES STAFF: David Bauman, Gail Belenson,
Lauren Berman, Sherri Blansky, Pam Bullock, Jeff Chen,
Tammy Christie, Milton Feld, Lisa George, Michelle Gill,
Matt Lane, Heather MacLachlan, JodiManchik, Eddy Meng,
Jackie Miller, Shelly Pleva, Debbie Retzky, Jim Ryan, Laura
Schlanger, Michelle Slavik, Mary Snyder, Marie Soma,
Cassie Vogel, Bruce Weiss.
NATIONALS: Valerie Breier
LAYOUT: Heather Barbar,.

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