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April 15, 1988 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-15
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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MICH-ELLANY

Good friends are hard to find

Reach back, seniors, juniors and
sophomores, to when you left home
and stepped on campus for the very
first time. Wide-eyed at the awesome
structure of Angell Hall and weaving
your way through the maze of sun-
bathers, hacky-sackers, and Preacher
Mike in the Diag, you wanted only
one thing: to share this incredible and
somewhat frightening experience
with someone else.
You were alone at the time,
weren't you.
Do you remember the first person
you ever met here? It was probably at
Orientation, probably another first-
year student in the same lonely boat
as you. You extended your hand to
that person, smiled, and thought,
"This person is going to be my best
friend for the next four years."
(Oh, come on. Admit it. Sure you
did.)
The first person I ever met at the
University was Steve. He was from a
small town in Illinois and thinking
of majoring in Engineering. He had a
passion for Reese's Peanut Butter
Cups (he told me everyday) and his
interests were boats and movies. He
liked Apocalypse Now a lot. I did,
too.
We had lunch together that day.
And as we CRISPed and exchanged

JOHN
SHEA

A

Mitch

Albom

phone numbers, I thought Steve was
going to be my best friend for the
next four years.
I never saw him again.
The second person I ever met at the
University was Kurt Heyman. He
was my next door neighbor at West
Quad and was a year ahead of me. His
major was Political Science, and his
interests were politics and movies.
He liked Citizen Kane a lot. I did,
too.
We went out to dinner that night.
He knew where all the good places
were, and we ended up having pizza
at one of the local establishments.
As we ate, we talked. By the time the
appetitizer came, our topic of
conversation had shifted from school
to movies. And by the time the main
course came, it had shifted from
movies to dreams, hopes, aspira-
tions, and women. Intimate guy-talk.
We became best friends.
Kurt took me under his wing that
year and helped me get through all

the red-tape that comes with going to
a 40,000-plus University. The next
year, we left West Quad; I went to
Markley, and he got an apartment
somewhere. We still kept in touch
and had a genuine concern for the
welfare of the other. When my girl-
friend back East wanted to break up
with me, Kurt offered me a ride to go
see her; and when I learned Kurt's
grandmother had passed away, I
dropped everything and hunted down
his home phone number, so I could
call him.
That was last year.
This year, I hardly ever see him.
He has submerged himself in a radio
project at WCBN (he hosts "Access,"
a show designed to help the handi-
capped get campus news they would
otherwise have difficulty getting),
and I am buried in work at the Daily;
neither of us has enough time to
study, much less to set aside an
evening for dinner.
Somewhere along the line, we
stopped caring.
When you think about it, it isn't
too hard to stop caring at a school
like this. Its size alone demands that
once you leave the isolated worlds of
the dorms, you have to go out of
your way next year to keep up with
Sea SHEA, Page 29

BEST BREAKFAST: Angelo's
Another annual winner, and we don't disagree. The
place is actually a "waffle shop." Don't miss the blue-
be ry waffles and don't bother going on weekends. The
line starts at 6 am.
BEST LATE NIGHT EATS: Brown
Jug
W-t'h the demise of the Pantree, there wasn't much
competition. Yes, there is some sort of tradition to sit-
ting in the place late at night, or more to the point,
early in the morning. But hey, they're not even open 24
hous. White Castle finished a weak second.
BEST TAKE-OUT: Zingerman's
BEST DELI: Zingerman's
Let's face it, the place is good, whether you eat it in-
side, outside, in a box, on a fox, on a plane, in the rain,
or on a train. Your tummy will smile even as your
wallet weeps.
BEST NEW RESTAURANT: The
Great Wall,
It couldn't quite beat out the old time faves, Sze-
Chuan West and Middle Kingdom, for "Best Chinese,"
but it pulled this one out. This was a good year for new
eateries in Ann Arbor with both Gratzi's and China
Gate garnering considerable support. Oh yeah, check out
the hot and sour soup. Anyhow, we're glad to see that
our readers' sense of adventure has improved; McDon-
ald's won last year.
BEST FOOD BARGAIN: Jerusalem
Garden
Another new food establishment walked away with
this one in a tight battle. The $1.75 falafels just
couldn't be beat. As the former owner of the now-de-
funct Ralph's, Market Mr. R., Propeetioer said, "It's
because we have the best deal in town." Well, yes.
BEST GREASY SPOON: The
Fleetwood Diner
Another Ann Arbcr institution, the classic diner won
for the second consecutive year, edging out the Brown
Jug, Blimpy's Burger, and the venerable Frank's.

BEST PLACE TO TAKE THE
FOLKS: The Gandy Dancer
Your 'rents will love it when the whole building
rocks as an Amtrak express rumbles by. Escargot, raw
oysters, clams, mussles... Hmmmm. But if your par-
ents are a little squeamish, tell them to go for the
poached salmon with mayonnaise and dill sauce.
BEST DORM CAFETERIA: Stock-
Yes, people were actually responded to this category.
Somehow, someway, "none" finished fourth, behind
Burstey and South Quad.
Best
Businesses
BEST WOMEN'S CLOTHING
STORE: Jacobson's
A close finish between Jake's and Bivoac, with Jake's
pulling ahead. Both stores are fashionably up-to-date,
but for all around selection, the department store wins
out.
BEST MEN'S CLOTHING STORE:
Bivouac
Rugged types will love the outdoor outfitters, and the
city boys will go gaga over the cotton socks and de-
signer everything. They've got an excellent selection of
Levi's 501s, including those funny sizes for those of
you with waists wider than your legs are long. Some
worthwhile bargains can be found at the seasonal clear-
ance sales.
BEST USED CLOTHING STORE:
Cat's Meow
We saw a green taffeta dress shot with silver threads
there the other day, just like June Cleaver's. Need we
saw more?
Continued on Page 6

Acclaimed sports columnist discusses Bo,
Bill Frieder, and Ice Water Willie
INTERVIEW
Mitch Albom has quickly risen to the top of his profession. Since
joining The Detroit Free Press in 1985, he has been named the best sports
columnist in the nation by the Associated Press the last two years. Albom
just released a book, "The Live Albom," which he will be autographing
this Sunday at The Community Newscenter (Noon-1:30) on South
University. A graduate of Brandeis University and a holder of master's
degrees in journalism and business from Columbia University, he was
recently interviewed by Daily sports staffer Mike Gill.
Daily: Tell me about your book.
Albom: The book came about around a year ago. The Free Press came up
with the idea. I was flattered that they wanted to do it. I didn't think at first
that it was that hot of an idea but later I said; "You know, this is a really
nice recollection of three years in Detroit sports." Some great things have
happened here. It's like a sports photo album. I'm very proud of the book.
D: After dabbling in various professions, do you think you'll make sports
writing a long career?
A: I don't think I'll keep doing it for a real long time. I've been doing this
five years. Five more years would be plenty. I might then do a general
column for a newspaper or I might just get out of it. You can get burned
out in this business real fast.
D: Do you plan on staying in Detroit?
A: I'd like to stay here. I don't want another sportswriter's job in the
country. I'd be happy finishing my sportswriting column stint here. Re-
member, I lived and worked in New York. That's where I began. A lot of
people want to get back there. I was happy to get out. Los Angeles doesn't
hold anything for me and Chicago and Detroit, well, I don't see a whole lot
of difference. I'm real happy with this. But what happens in five years? I
could be back playing the piano on an island in the South Pacific.
D: Were you a class clown in your younger days? Is that where you gained
your humor?
A: I love to laugh. I watch comedies all the time at home. I read funny
books. I love to hang out with people who make me laugh. Sportswriting
is a crack-up of a field. You spend a lot of time laughing. That's why it's
so hard to get out of the business because it's so much fun to be in it.
Press boxes have so much laughing, so much joking on. That's where I
get my humor from, just hanging around with funny people and laughing
at life. I try not to take anything too seriously. I wasn't a class clown, but
I love to laugh.
D: What were your college days like?
A: I never went to class, if that's what you want to know. I was a musi-
cian and I played at night in little bars around the area. I lived in a kind of
Animal House, place - the same ten guys for all four years. It was the
best time I think I ever had.
D: Did you work at all for the school newspaper, while in college?
See INTERVIEW, Page 29

I

OFF THE WALL
To all those disgruntled about the
failure of proposal C, here's some
food for thought:
Dark and Lonely on a summer night
Kill my landlord, kill my landlord
Big dog barking... Do he bite?
Kill my landlord, kill my landlord
Open his winodw, break his neck
Then his house, I set to wreck
Why do I do it? What the heck
Kill my landlord, kill my landlord
C.I.L. my landlord.
- Rackham
There's a fine line between
sensitivity and censorship
-Student Publications
A coondog howls on a Saturday
night
I try to sleep but it don't feel right
The moon is full
My brain's abuzz
My head's a hole
all filled with fuzz
I'll get out alive
if it's the last thing I do
They've got me down
but I'll pull through
-East Quad

SKETCAD

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THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

A Van Boven employee careful
Amiga 500
Amiga 2000c
IBM-XT compa
Apple I[e/I[c o
Li ghtning Boft
ISRAEL'S 40TH fE
A CONCERT BY "THE
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 8

PjvY CoD , V4E

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Do~lir4 T

]dowers
Plants & Bouquets
" Corsages
" Bouquets of Flowers
It costs no more
for the e
209 S. State St. I
(nen co Olgas)
662-0042
cvzh &dfM7

1 1'
DINNER FOR TWO
I Come to Uno's for a regular size I
1 specialty pizza and your choice I
1 of soup or salad for only
$8.95
1 Dine in only1
1 not valid with any other coupon
1 expires 4/30/88
DINE IN
DELIVERY
CARRY OUT
(Limited Delivery Area)
Dai1W11002 .BerScil ghy
reMnna&bar

N,

I
p
K

5:30pm Anderson Room,
Michigan Union
Community wide memorial
service for the fallen
soldiers of Israel.

6:45pm Mi
Reception
to sample
munchies.

-' - " "-J
- - -Q-

Concert Tickets available at Michigan Th
$12, $8 and $5 (students and senior citiz
Group discounts/ credit card orders : 66E
Co-sponsored by the JCA/UJA.

u

PAGE 28 WEEKEND/ARIL 15,8 WEEKEND/APRIL 15, 1988

WEEKEND/APRIL 15, 1988

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