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September 10, 1987 - Image 69

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-10
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The Michigan Daily, Thursday, S

Page 12 -The'Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 10, 1987

mamm.smRADIO

GUIDE

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By Brian Jarvinen
One of the good things about
moving is discovering the new
opportunities on the radio dial.
Perhaps you have already scanned
the Ann Arbor airwaves, hoping to
find the perfect station. If you
haven't, this article will help you
unlock the mysteries of the local
FM dial.
Two ,area stations play classical
music, WQRS at 105.1, and the
station with the most unoriginal
call letters, WUOM at 91.7. The
award for dullest local call letters
goes to WWWW, 106.7, a station
that concentrates on country music.
Two stations broadcast easy
listening music, WNIC, 100.3,.and
WOMC at 104.3. WOMC recently
hired Alan Almond and his deep,
deep voice to do his Pillow Talk
show week nights at 7 p.m.
Jazz lovers will never change
their dial oncethey discover
WEMU at 89.1. Broadcasting just
down the pike at Eastern Michigan
University in Ypsilanti, WEMU
plays jazz 24 hours a day with short
breaks for news from the National

Public Radio Network.
On Sundays WEMU hosts two
excellent blues shows, Martino D's
Big City Blues Cruise from 4 p.m.
to 7 p.m., followed by When The
Sun Goes Down from 7 p.m. to 9
p.m.
Students face a large number of
similar stations that play rock and
pop. Two stations provide standard
top 40 programming, WHYT at
96.3 and WCZY at 95.5. Standard
is the key word here, as it is nearly
impossible to tell the two apart.
Both stations play current top forty
songs, have fast talking DJs that
babble over the beginning and end
of tunes.
A third station, WDTX at 99.5,
also plays top 40, but with a slight
twist compared to the other two.
DTX used to champion new music,
which included sponsoring a
Smiths concert last August, but
now it is doubtful if they even own
the latest Smiths record. The
difference between DTX and the
other two stations is that DTX will
play some top 40 songs before they
reach the top 40, such as new
Duran Duran singles.

WJLB at 97.9 features the
soul/R&B charts in their pure form,
instead of the crossover songs heard
on the top 40 stations.
The most dominant format in
the area is AOR, short for Album
Oriented Radio. Five stations play
this style, which consists of
straight rock/metal/British Invasion
songs. Someone screwed up when
they named the newest of these
stations, 94.7 WCSX. They should
have named it after their favorite
group and called it WCSN, or
maybe just WSeventies. CSX plays
"classic rock," which consists of
only the biggest rock acts of the
'60s and '70s.
Three other Detroit stations,
WRIF, 101.1, WLLZ, 98.7, and
WIOT, 104.5, sound fairly similar,
but not are not as identical as the
top forty stations. WRIF, or The
Riff, is the most conservative when
it comes to adding new songs,
however WRIF's DJs have the
most personality of any local
station. Mark Addie's Rock Cafe
program from 1:15 a.m. to 6 a.m.
mixes his favorites, your requests,
44new"' music, and obscure album

By Brian Jarvinen
The best thing about Ann Arbor
other than the five dollar fine for
marijuana possession has to be
record prices. Most new releases
cost $7 instead of the $8 to $9
prices found in chain stores such as
Harmony House. The reason for
this is competition between five
new record stores and two used
record dealers, all of which are

within a few blocks of each other.
This competition is also starting to
drive CD prices down as well.
Classical music fans will be glad
to know that Ann Arbor has two
stores devoted to them on the same
street. Liberty Music at 417 East
Liberty St. features a large selection
of classical music and classic jazz
recordings on album, cassette or
CD. SKR Classical, the definitive
classical store in. the area, is just

down the street at 539 East Liberty
St. SKR has an absolutely huge
selection of classical music on all
formats, including rarely seen reel-
to-reel tapes. The compact disc
selection is the largest in town. The
staffs of both stores are very
knowledgeable on differences
between recordings of the same
work, and both stores offer a search
service as well.
The best prices in town are
found at Ann Arbor's two used
record stores. PJ's Used Records at
619 Packard is a bit off the beaten
path, but is worth finding. PJ's has
a large rock and jazz selection, a
women's music section, a
convenient new release section, and
every other conceivable type of
album.
The other used record store,
Wazoo Records, located above
Bivouac Travel on South State St.,
can be addictive. Wazoo has many
detractors who bitch about the
cramped conditions, rude help, and
truly random sounds on the stereo,
but these people keep going back
anyway.
Wazoo's large selection of new
and old rock, jazz, classical, soul,
and import records consistently
lures record fanatics back. To be
fair about the help, though, you

wouldn't like customers either that
have to be told that Bon Jovi
records are in the B section. Any
new record that comes out can
eventually be found there, usually
right after you pay full price
somewhere else.
If you can't find a rare bootleg,
45 or twelve inch from your
favorite artist, this is the place to
look. Both used record stores can be
good sources of cash in between
trips home, and both have used CD
sections, a cheap way to build a CD
collection.
If you like your records in shrink
wrap, State Discount, located where
else but South State St., offers the
best prices on new records. This
store, which is not really a record
store but closer to a newsstand,
frequently puts older records on sale
for three to five dollars, and recently
reduced CD prices to $12.
Discount Records, just across
the street at the corner of Liberty
and State streets, is a chain store
that manages to hold its own
price-wise. Discount was the first
local store to move into CDs in a
big way, with a very large section
devoted to the expensive little
creatures in the back of the store.
Discount also has the largest
cassette and top forty 45s selection

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Doily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
WCBN disc Jockey Sting Ray Belmont plays the Goldfinger theme song

First order of checks FREE
for new student accounts opened
at our two campus locations.

Checking and savings;
NBD 24-hour banker;
overdraft protection.
We look forward to serving you!
DANN ARBOR
SUBSIDIARY OF NBD BANCORP, INC./ MEMBER FDIC
Michigan Union, Lower Level " 995-8037
Campus Office - E. William at Thompson " 995-8080
Ten Other Convenient Locations

during his Music for the Good Life Show.
tracks from major artists into the
best late night show around.
WLLZ, also known as Wheels,
features the most heavy metal in
the area, yet they balk at playing
metal on the cutting edge such as
Metallica or Megadeath. WIOT
broadcasts from Toledo, making it a
little tricky to pick up. WIOT is
the most adventurous of the AOR
stations in adding new songs
typified by the presence of the new
Psychedelic Fur's single in their
rotation.
No matter what you might think
of the biggest local station, Ann
Arbor's 102.9 WIQB, one thing is
for sure - you won't be able to
escape hearing it, especially in a
dorm. WIQB plays songs in a top
40 style, but instead of the top
forty singles they play current hits
from the top selling albums. The
result tends to mirror whatever is
on MTV during the week.
WIQB also plays a large dose of
classic rock songs, but not as many
as the other stations. WIQB's best
feature is the Eleven O'clock
Special, an hour of material by one
artist, which makes for a great way
to record a greatest hits tape. The
biggest drawback about WIQB is
their DJs, who have to be the most
interchangeable generic jockeys in
existence.
Ann Arbor has a large variety of
stations available, however two
station's formats encompass many
musical styles all on one frequency.
The student run station, WCBN, at
88.3, has got to play the widest
range of music of any station in the
country.
WCBN is located in the
basement of the Student Activities
Building and has recently increased
its wattage to 200. This means that
the coverage area has increased

about twenty times from what it
was originally. Previously it
operated on a 10-watt channel.
According to Barry Bouwsma,
ex-chief engineer at WCBN, the
station is an "aural experience" that
no one should miss, and with the
increased wattage, there is no reason
to. Whether your musical taste is
jazz, classical, blues, funk or
reggae, WCBN plays it.
The music at this "happenin"
station - as one staff member calls
it - is as diverse as the people
who work there, and since it is a
non-commercial, non-restrictive
station, the disc jockeys are free to
play anything they want to. Frank
Uhle, who hosts a show form from
12 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Fridays, said
he plays "whatever inspires (him)."
The other station that plays a
variety of music is WDET, at
102.9. WDET is the only station
around besides WCBN where you
can hear Robert Cray followed by
Steel Pulse. WDET also has a large
variety of programs that feature
blues, jazz, international music, and
ethnic music. A schedule is
available by calling the station.
Some of you may already have
noticed what the metro Detroit area
lacks: a "new" music station.
WCBN plays a lot of new music,
but you have to know their
schedule to hear it. For now, new
music fans will have to be content
with programs that last two or three
hours on various stations. The best
of these is Brave New Waves , week
nights at 11 p.m. on CBE, 89.9.
WRIF broadcasts the Sonic
Rendezvous on Sundays at 8 p.m.
WDET hides then program, Radio
Clash, on Friday at 2 a.m. Two
shows can be heard on Sunday at 10
p.m., Radios In Motion on WLLZ,
and'Guerilla Radio on WDTX.

ROOM SERVI(

When the munchies attack...
When you're partying or studying...When you
want a great burger...CALL BURGER FRESH-
WE DELIVER! In 30 minutes or less,
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MENU

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON

PIZZA
HOUSE'.
Dine In or Carry Out
11m-lam

99-5-5095
FREE DELIVERY
618 Church Across from Rick's Cafe

Ann Arbor resident Fred Barnardin and Penn State student Doug
Bernardin look through records at P.J.'s Records on Packard St.
215 S. STATE
ANN ARBOR, MI
313-663-7403
JAPANESE RESTAURANT

SANDWICHES
FRESHBURGERTM
FRESHBURGERm WITH CHEESE
BIG FRESHTM BURGER
(Two 4oz. prime beef patties with cheese and our
special sauce)
BROILED BREAST OF CHICKEN
BATTERED BREAST OF CHICKEN
FILET OF FISH
FRESH FRIESTM
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STEAMED VEGGIE ENTREETm
(Fresh steamed vegetables on a bed of potatoes,
topped with cheese sauce)
GARDEN SALAD
(With your choice of our "Famous Ranch" or
Italian Lite dressing)
HOMEMADE BROCCOLI SOUP
BEVERAGES
l6oz. RC COLA
16oz. DIET RITE COLA
KID's MEAL
(Kid's Burger, Fresh FriesT' & a Surprise!)

$1.73
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Open 7 Days a We
Delivery Hours:
10:30 A.M.-8:30 P.
11:30 A.M.-8:30 PJ
Carry-out if you wish
We serve all of Ann
Call the BURGER FF
Northeast 1160 Bro
Northwest 1522 N.
West 2117 W.
South 1952 S.
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APPETIZERS
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CHIPATIS

LASAGNA 25 FLAVORS of Shakes, Malts
WELCOME BACK TO GREAT FOODI

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DAILY SPECIALS
TAKE-OUT
HOURS:
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Sun. - closed until Sept. 13
then 3PM-8PM

$1.73 2 FREE 16
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$ .67
$ Devery orders only. P
$ 16 coupon when calling in
coupon per order. Not
$2.21 other offers.
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Coupon Explrem Oct

kx.r:.

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