100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 10, 1987 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 14-The Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 10, 1987

0

.k.Fn "..................!:lmm w.AO M M NM ..S

Academic
counselors
help sort
out the U'

By LISA POLLAK
Remember your high school
counselors? Those people in the
principal's office whose primary
importance in your life was most
likely to staple your S.A.T. scores
to your transcripts and tell you that,
no, they wouldn't call Harvard and
put in a good word for you?
Well, counselors, like grades and
exams, will again be a part of your
life at the University. But unlike
high school, Orientation was
probably the only time in college
that your counseling was structured,
assigned, and arranged by somebody
else.
When and where to get your
academic advice at the University is

largely something that you choose
for yourself. And in the next four
years counselors will become much
more important in leading you
through the maze of courses,
requirements, and university proto -

students who request counseling
will be provided with a full time
counselor. Often students will see
a different counselor each time they
enter the counseling office.
"Of course, a student can request

'When and where to get your academic advice at the
University is largely something that you choose for
yourself.

consult, with a counselor before
their first-term of registration.
Students are expected to make any
additional appointments as their
individual needs warrant and as
questions arise as to what fields of
study to pursue.
So students are not expected to
have a close relationship with any
one counselor - a situation some
officials say would be impossible
because of size of the university.
LSA counselors also hold
regular office hours in the majority
of residence halls on a weekly
basis. Here students can develop
closer ties with their counselors
because the same counselors come
to the each week.

An alternative to making
appointments or dealing with staff
counselors is offered by the Student
Counseling Office, a student-run
group that provides counseling on a
walk-in basis to LSA students.
Billing themselves as peer
counselors "in an informal and
relaxed atmosphere," the SCO in U
Haven Hall is most popular for its
file of old exams.
SCO counselors can also inform
students about more than just the
content and credit of a class.
Students who have actually sat
through the classes will candidly
relate such facts as how hard, how
boring, or how worthwhile a class
may be.

col than every before.
Academic advising is provided
by all the schools and colleges at
the university. While sometimes
this advice will come from faculty
members or graduate students, most

a specific counselor, but sometimes
he will be available and sometimes
he won't" said an employee in the
LSA counseling office.
But LSA, like many other
schools, only requires students to

'/R,'.............!..............1..........! '. ,./ C

MAKING ENDS MEET

Students seek

financial aid

By BRIAN BONET
Due partly to increasing tuition
rates and the high cost of living in
Ann Arbor, nearly half of the
University's student body turns to
the the Office of Financial Aid to
help make ends meet.
"Our packages are among the
best of any schools, public or
private, in the state," said Harvey
Grotrian, financial aid director.
According to Grotrian, the primary
goal of the office is to aid students
who, without financial assistance,
would be unable to attend The
University, whose tuition is the
most expensive among public
universities in the country.
The office tries to meet the
financial needs of all in-state
students, he said, but non-residents
have no such guarantee.
Last year, the University awarded
nearly $40 million to under-
graduates, and currently an estim-

ated 12,000 undergraduate and
graduate students, excluding medical
and law students, receive aid.
The formula the University uses
to determine who is eligible for
financial aid is derived by sub-
tracting the estimated family
contribution to tuition from the
total cost of attending the
University for a year.
In figuring the family con-
tribution, the University determines
how much the applicant is expected
to contribute to their education and
how much their parents are expected
to contribute.
Student contribution is calcu-
lated by the amount of money the
applicant earns from summer jobs
and part-time jobs during the school
year. In addition, if the applicant
has a checking or savings account,
the University expects part of the
balance to go towards the appli-
cant's education.

Some students, though, have
found the financial expectations the
University places on them unrea-
sonable. Last winter the Daily
reported that one student, Laura, a
fifth year senior who didn't want to
use her real name, said the amount
of money she was required to earn
during the summer jumped
drastically during her junior and
senior years.
The amount of parental
contribution is determined by the
parents' financial status. The
University requires the parents of
each applicant to fill out a financial
statement. The form asks questions
about family size, the number of
dependents attending college,
parents' income, and the value of
parents' assets.
The estimated amount of
parental contribution for each
student is determined by how much
the applicant's parents appear to be

able to pay toward their child's
expenses and where they stand
financially compared to the rest of
the applicants.
Many students, however, say
their parents are expected to give
more money then they can afford.
The University has an appeal
process which considers unusual
circumstances surrounding financial
aid, but there has rarely been a case
when parents would be exempted
from contributing to the tuition.
The recenE change in the federal
government's student assistance
programs from offering grants to
private loans may have an affect on
the University's financial aid
process, said Bob Holmes, the
assistant vice president for academic
affairs.
"The federal government is less
generous than we would like, so the
University must find alternative
ways to help students," he said.

14

q

The bestlDaily Photo by SCOTT TUCH
Daily readers voted last spring that South Quad had the best dorm food iin
the Weekend Magazine's Best of Ann Arbor poll. The two SQ food service.
workers pictured said they were surprised to hear the news. (Maybe they
know something we don't.)

FROM

ONE

NEWCOMER...

Clubs can be
rewarding
.(Continued from Page 12)

T O
a e W
ea e a d Ope ne st-
ionth oa ess been b usy
rs for We haVe -jth
ir e thenur shelves eed to
get fft at

AN OTHER!

I'-G

I. "
/

the most practical and feasible
extra-curricular choices.
SIX. Do explore. Just because,4
you were a student government
leader, a newspaper editor, or an
actor in high school doesn't mean
you have to fall into the same
catagories once in college. While
the University does offer the
traditional clubs, it also offers
activities as obscure, controversial,.
varied, and unusual as life itself.
And isn't that what they've said
college is all about in the first
place?

11

I r-A
II PA 4 14

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

~~burlty yothe best.
embr o bly isbks
Rem blle pP yght boos
early, aran tethe
We .gur classes'
forYuC

I

book & supply
Three Floors of Almost Everything!

S8MHzXT
$888.00
640K, 2 floppies, par, ser,,.
game, clock-cal, monitor,.'
keyboard, 150W P/S
1OHMz AT
S$ 1748.00
512K (to IMB), 1.2 MB floppy, E
20MB hang drive, par, ser.
keyboqrd, monitor, runs
Full 1-Year Warranty
SHERWOOD COMPUTER

4

4

First Floor
UofM INSIGNIA
CLOTHING & SOUVENIRS
GREETING CARDS
PRINTS & POSTERS
BACKPACKS
CANDY & SNACKS
AND MUCH MORE

Second Floor
OFFICE SUPPLIES
ART & ENGINEERING
SUPPLIES FOR THE
STUDENT & PROFESSIONAL
PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES
* CALCULATORS, BOOKS
AND ACCESSORIES

Third Floor
COURSE TEXTS
NEW AND USED
(We have course lists
from your instructors)
PROFESSIONAL BOOKS
* SPECIAL ORDERS
TEXT BOOK OFFICE

TAKE THIS HOME
TO YOUR PARENTSI (
We have a brief Brochure outlining .
the many advantages (saving money*1
& taxes, capital gains, real-life work
* experience, better living, better
* studying, security . . .) of having
your parents buy a condo or house
* fr your residence in Ann Arbor. It
* beats living in a dorm forever!
Call Today for your free brochure. .
* (We'll send a copy to your parents, too.)
(313)662-3958 Bob Hefner
The Michigan Group, REALTORS
* 2350 Washtenaw*
* Ann Arbor, MI 40104*
23 ari"4 0
Wlt
14r0 -
8a~,ji1

NOTICE OUR SPECIAL BOOK RUSH HOURS

Tuesday-Friday Sept. 1-4-8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 5-9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 6-12:00 Noon to 5:00 p.m.
Labor Day, Mon. Sept. 7-12 Noon to 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday-Thursday, Sept. 8-10-8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Friday Sept. 11-8:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Saturday Sept. 12-9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 13-12 Noon to 5:00 p.m.
Mon.-Wed., Sept. 14-16-8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Thursday Sept. 17-8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Friday Sept. 18-8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 19-9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

I - I 3

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan