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September 10, 1987 - Image 45

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 10, 1987-Page 13

Heat! ev:

'U'

By CATHY SHAP
When Director of Campus
ecurity Leo Heatley came to the
University in 1985 to assume his
position, he brought with him a
goal - to turn campus security
ir4o a police force. And if a state
bill allowing public colleges and
universities to establish their own
police forces passes the legislature,
Heatley may get his wish.
"The University of Michigan is
the-only Big Ten, four-year, public
.m_ titution without sworn police
officers," Heatley said. "We depend
on outsiders for authorized safety."
Heatley said a separate Univer-
sity police force would be more in
tune with the University. "Police
response would be much better if
officers were here everyday,
working with the students and
staff," he said. If deputized, security
officers would be sworn in,
authorized to carry a weapon, and'
able to make arrests.
CAMPUS Security has a bu-
d"6t of approximately 2.2 million
d tlars, 25 percent of which goes to
the Ann Arbor Police Department
for the use of seven patrol cars, 14

JO lt.Olj w

officers and two detectives. Heatley
said that Ann Arbor Police have
been responsive to the needs of the
campus to the best of their ability.
But he said, when security
officials get into a situation where
they need police support, it usually
takes some time before the police
arrive.
He also said the extra burden of
the campus population on the
police can affect the safety of
campus security officers who are
not authorized to carry weapons or
make formal arrests.
"(The police) try their best to
respond to us. They are extremely
busy," said a Campus Security
Officer who wished to remain
anonymous. "I have sometimes
wished, though, that I had instant
assistance, and it is that moment of
waiting that I'm concerned about."
He said'
HE ALSO said there have been
instances when security officers
have been threatened because alleged
criminal know security officers do
not carry a weapon.
. Although Heatley has wanted a
campus police force since he came

needs
here, the University has not attem-
pted to establish its own force.
To get one the University would
have had to go through the city
sheriff's department for author-
ization, and according to Heatley,
the University has historically
wished to remain out of local
politics.
But if Senate Bill 309 is passed
in the fall, it will empower the
University regents and other public
institution governing boards the
ability "to vest their public safety
officers with certain powers and
authority and to require those public
safety officers to meet certain
standards."
UNDER this bill a University
police force would also be free from
subordination to local law enforce-
ment agencies and would receive
state funding for necessary training
programs. Heatley said there would
be no necessity for an increase in
the budget in order to establish the
police force.
He said his ultimate goal is to
establish a force of 20 sworn polic
officers. There would still b ;
campus security officers withoL'

Iwn
arresting powers who woul
respond to the minor and les
dangerous calls.
According to Heatley, ther
would also remain a workir
relationship with the city polic
because the campus could neve
have the resources to operate con
pletely alone.
If the bill passes Heatley woul
like to see a police force trainir
program begun in the next year ar,
a half. But James Brinkerhoff, Vic,
President and Chief financi
officer, said that the regents haven'
even discussed the idea, so 1
doubts that, if the bill passe
anything would get started unt
three years from now.
ALTHOUGH there has bee
no organized opposition to the id
of a University police force, Mik
Phillips, chair of the Stude
Rights Committee, is against t]
idea. "Just because the idea wor
on other campuses, does not mea
it will work here," he said.
But Sherry Veramay, chair of t
Campus Safety Committee said sh
would like to see the committ
support the idea of a campus polic

police

force
"The campus is a completely
separate entity from the city and our
department is here as a service for
the students, faculty and citizens of
MSU," she said.
Smith also said that patrolling a
campus population is a unique
situation. "Some of these young
people haven't matured, and they
have an aversion to authority and
because of this our situation is
unique.
"It is a plus to have a police
force strictly for the campus, which
understands the needs and behavior
of the population," Smith said.

Heatley
... wants a campus police force

force. She said, however, "The
en sentiment towards the proposal is
ea varied because people might not be
ke totally informed about the issue."
nt Michigan State University has
[he had a separate police force since
ks 1947. If it were not for the
an department, the city police force
would have to be vastly expanded,
the and according to Beth Smith,
he director of the MSU Public
ee Relations Department, this would
ce be a tremendous burden.

RweM
We
D04~
M06aj44

The Daily has both proponents and bitter critics
(Continued from Page 4) sure your own information is faculty and university policies. When asked what could be done press anytime an effort is n
deviant and run counter to to those accurate. Tell people that when they They were soon disappointed, about The Daily, University do something about it."'
deUithe comunit t large claim they've been misquoted six however, when Board chair Prof. President Robben Fleming wrote in Despite the often de
os the community at larged times." Fred Scott adopted a hands-off 1970: criticism, The Daily staff
observed Fred Ferris, who studied Occasional inaccuracies have lost policy on editorial matters. "College newspapers everywhere the gaffs are only an unfo
DTta lil shilP nioa ctffr

ade 'to
served
insists
rtunate

1 i
!9 1

I*A~ [la y veue Posing as a sa er.
-'But if Daily staffers don't lead
tie life of the average student, they
at least are reaching the average
student, as some Daily editors
ond when they asked readers their
opinions of the paper in the
fighbowl last winter.
, M OS T passersby said they
liked the paper. Some joked. "It's
almost like reading a real
newspaper," one student said.
One doctoral student, who was
also a University undergraduate,
said she appreciates The Daily more
w than she had as an
"Most people here have never
lbeen exposed to another college
newspaper and don't know how bad
most of them are," she said.
: But love for the Daily is not
Oniversal since it is run by
journalism newcomers who are apt
to make occasional mistakes. Some
f the Daily's most vocal critics
all the staffers "proto-journalists"
qr "pseudo-journalists."
BUT according to 1986 News
9ditor Jerry Markon, "There's
nothing you can do to make up for
vast mistakes, but you can make

'The Daily has successfully created and is currently
maintaining a separate culture that supports values
and a social system that.. .run counter to to those of
the community at large.'
- Fred Ferris, University alumnus

have always been, and probably
always will be, a thorn. They are
inaccurate, biased, often in poor
taste, inflammatory and usually
staffed by people who are
considerably more radical than the
student body
"IN MOST of these charac -
teristics, they find their parallel in
commercial newspapers. Perhaps
this is the reason the Daily is so
vigorously defended by the public

byproduct of a necessary process
that has gone on for nearly a
century.
"The sad truth is that people
want a free press only as long as it
doesn't hurt them or their friends,"
said 1968 Editor Roger Rapoport.
"The Daily doesn't ask you for your
love, but we do hope you
understand that one permanent risk
of a free press is that you might get
caught by it.

The Daily some readers. "It's too
inaccurate to bother with anymore,"
said former Architecture and Urban
Planning Dean Robert Metcalf.
Physics Prof. Daniel Axelrod
said in an editorial last March,
"Virtually every newsworthy event
on this campus with which I have
been familiar in the last few years
has been routinely misunderstood,
misreported, and misquoted by the
news staff. Several months ago I
resolved totally to ignore The Daily
in favor of the University Record
and Ann Arbor News."
WITH some organizations,
however, hostility toward the Daily
seems to be the norm. The faculty
and administration are practically
natural enemies of the paper. In
1903 the University Senate
established the Board in Control of
Student Publications, hoping to
curtail The Daily's criticism of
hwmi

"Although the Board has on
occasion experienced anxiety and
even chagrin over some of the
articles in The Daily, it has
carefully and consistently refrained
from interfering in any official way
with the policy of the editorial
staff," Scott said in 1904.
ALTHOUGH there are now
fewer editorial clashes betweenthe
Board and The Daily staff, any
dispute with the Board over editorial
content must always be resolved
favoring the Daily.
According to former Board chair
Charles Eisendrath, "Regents Bylaw
11.33, which determines the powers
of the Board for Student
Publications, specifically enjoins
the Board from determining editorial
policy for constituent publi -
cations."
But administration frustration
with The Daily is nothing new.

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