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October 06, 1987 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-06

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 6, 1987- Page 5

NAACP's efforts may

By STEPHEN GREGORY
If the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee votes
against federal Judge Robert Bork's appointment to
the Supreme Court today, the University's NAACP
chapter may have played a part in the decision.
Matthew Leitman, a member of the University's
National Association for the Advancement of Colored
People chapter, said the group collected roughly 270
letters from University students, urging senators to
vote against Bork's appointment.
The chapter mailed the letters to selected senators
last Friday.
Leitman, chair of the the chapter's Anti-Bork
Committee, said the group has worked in conjunction
with NAACP chapters nationwide to defeat the Bork
nomination.
Last summer, NAACP members agreed that
blocking Bork's appointment was the group's top
concern at its national convention in New York City.
Althea Simmons, NAACP Anti-Bork lobbyist in
Washington, D.C., said chapters across the country

have been "extremely helpful" in gathering support
against Bork.
Leitman said the letters were targeted at three
senators - William Cohen (R-Maine), Howell Heflin
(D-Alabama), and Arlen Specter (R-Pennsylvania) -
who have yet to choose sides on the Bork debate and
Senate Majority Leader and judiciary committee
member Robert Byrd (D-West Virginia).
Letters were also sent to Sen. Dennis DeConcini
(D-Arizona) who yesterday broke weeks of silence on
his decision and threw his weight against the
nomination.
Cathy Guest, a spokesperson for Cohen, said that
the estimated 3,000 to 4,000 letters he has received
from all over the nation "will be important in his
decision," but will only be one of the factors
involved.
She said Cohen will also consider his personal
study of Bork's rulings and essays, as well as the

,lp can Bork.
opinions of a majority of his constituents.
Guest said that at last count, the letters opposed
the nomination by a two-to-one margin.
An assistant for Heflin said the senator has received
"a lot of letters and phone calls" concerning the
nomination, but she refused to reveal either the
margin of support or the stance the majority of the
letters took.
She said, however, the letters and phone calls
flooding into his office will "weigh into his
decision."
Leitman said the chapter gained most its support
through minority organizations in the dormitories.
NAACP's Simmons said that aside from
encouraging letter-writing, a number of chapters
nationwide have worked together to compile a 99-page
report on how the ideology of potential justices has
been a consideration in making appointments since:
the high court began.
She said a copy of the report was given to all
members of the U.S Senate last Wednesday.

De Conceini
... says he'll oppose Bork

Undecided senators join anti-Bork camps; vote today

(Continued from Page 1)
option is being considered."
The decisions by Byrd and DeConcini
also will affect the Senate Judiciary
Committee vote Tuesday on the type of
recommendation the panel will make to the
full Senate.
They became the seventh and eighth
.awmakers on the 14-member panel to
innounce opposition to Bork. Cranston said

the vote "would likely turn out to be a
negative recommendation" although a
decision of "no recomendation" is still
possible.-:
Both sides have said the nomination
should be sent to the full Senate, no mater
how many committee members oppose
confirmation.
Five Republican members of the
committee favor Bork, and Sen. Howell

Heflin (D-Ala.) is to make his decision
known today.
Byrd said he would vote against Bork
because of concerns about privacy, the right
of Congress to sue the president in federal
court, and because the nomination is "too
controversial to go forward with."
The Supreme court has already acted this
year in:

-Turning down an appeal aimed at
scuttling the prosecution of Michael
Deaver, the former presidential aide charged
with lying to a grand jury about his
lobbying activities;
-agreeing to consider broadening the
remedy for workers who claim to be
victims of sexual harassment in a North
Carolina case.

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.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................. ............ """""...."" *....""" r~ ~r ' irr r
Huiron High parents r ally o ver racial slur

By EDWARD KLEINE
A group of Black parents of children
ittending Ann Arbor public schools is
lanning a rally tomorrow night to demand
hat a teacher who made a racial remark last
nonth be fired.
The Black Student Parent Support Group
vill ask that Ann Arbor Huron High School
iology teacher Dale Greiner be removed and
ransferred to a job where he will not have

Greiner was trying to quiet a group of
students last month and made a comment to
the effect of the students "growing up to be
dumb niggers," according to Zakiyyah Ali, a
parent of one of the students and facilitator of
the parents' group.
Greiner was suspended for one day with pay
for the remark.
Group spokesperson John Philpot said
Greiner's apology is not sufficient to mend the

"We want Mr. Greiner removed from all
contact with children," Philpot said.
Both Philpot and Ali had children in
Greiner's class when he made the remark.
Ann Arbor Public Schools Deputy
Superintendent Hayward Richardson defended
the day-long penalty, saying it was based on
Greiner's past record, which showed he "has
been very supportive of black students in the
past."
But Richardson added, "the remark was very

severe, and we said it was inexcusable."
The parents group has arranged for a
hearing with Public Schools Ombudsman
LeRoy Cappaert to appeal the action taken
against Greiner.
Richardson said that since the incident, the
Ann Arbor Board of Education has asked
administrators to draw up a policy regarding
disciplinary action for teachers who make
racist remarks.

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Restaurants reap profits from Sunday customers

(Continued from Page 1) '
Sunday is the store's third busiest
day behind Friday and Saturday.
Although businesses say the
revenue created by Sunday's hungry
students is not essential to their
continued survival, it does mean

that Ashley's can remain open on
Sunday during the school year.
There is not enough customers on
Sundays during the rest of the year
to warrant doing business, said
Ashley's manager, Keith Hunt. He
attributed the restaurant's increased
turnover largely to Sunday dinner

specials targeted specifically
towards dorm residents.
Dorm residents also patronize
the Ann Arbor's finer restaurants.
Jennifer Krolik, a Residential
College sophomore and a waitress
at Bicycle Jim's Restaurant and Pub

observed, "Although students do
not tip as well as the business
crowd we get during the week, the
money is still there because of the
high turnover rate caused by
underclassmen. In other words, you
work your ass off but in the end it's
worth it."

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