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September 24, 1987 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-24

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 24, 1987- Page 5

'U'

drops possible carcinogens on North Campus

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
Possible carcinogens in insecti-
cide pellets used in a University
weed-killing program have alarmed
residents of the Northwood area on
North campus.
The graduate family housing area
was scattered with pellets of "2,4-
D," an herbicide, early Tuesday
morning.
Some residents feel the herbicide
is- unsafe to their health. All resi-
dents contacted asked that their
names not be used for fear of being
denied leases in the future.
One resident complained that the
pellets remained on the ground for
several hours. They were swept up
Deans'
views of
Bork
conflict
(Continued from Page 1)
Sandalow intends to testify to the
contrary. He hopes to disprove
charges that Bork has tried to modify
his views to gain the nomination.
An expert on constitutional law,
Sandalow intends to "show that the
positions Bork now takes, he took
before the confirmation hearing."
Sandalow, who is on a year-long
sabbatical from the University and
will return next fall as a professor,
said he was approached personally by
Bork to testify.
The second part of Sandalow's
testimony will deal with what he
terms "the real reason for the Bork
controversy... During the past 25
years, the main direction of the ar-
gument of students of constitutional
law has been between people who
think we ought to use the constitu-
tion as an institution-of social re-
form and those who believe that un-
der the constitution, the task of
achieving social reform is primarily
the responsibility of the politically
accountable branches of govern-
ment."
Sandalow, who belongs to the
latter school of thought, said that he
would try to explain at the hearings
"why it is so important to appoint
to the court someone of Bork's judi-
cial philosophy."
"The nomination process has de-
teriorated very badly," Sandalow
said, "It's become like a political
campaign." He called it "the in-
evitable outcome when the Court
intrudes into political decision mak-
ing."
"Judicial appointments are going
to look more and more like elections
to political office and we will lose
the benefits of a politically indepen-
dent judiciary," Sandalow said.
Many students shared the view of
third-year law student J.P. Wilson
on the dueling deans: "I think it is
healthy. What you're hearing from
the deans is something you'd hear if
you were a fly at-a faculty meeting."
See 'U', Page 7

Herbicide scattered near grad ate family ho using

with blowers, which propelled the
dust into the air, through open win-
dows and doors, and onto children's
toys and sandpiles, the resident said.
According to one resident, the ac-
tions taken to warn the members of
the community of the pelleting were
"completely inadequate."
"There was no warning to keep
children out of contact with the pel-
lets, or to close doors and windows.
The herbicide was treated as a totally
benign substance," he added.

Robert Hanselmann, the general
foreman for grounds maintenance,
responded, "Every thing we use is
approved by the EPA and by the
University environmental health de-
partment. The fertilizer we use is not
dangerous."
According to Eric Luskin, director
of Family Housing, the University
is only carrying out its annual weed
and feed program. "We have to
fertilize the lawns without fertilizing
the weeds. The fertilizer contains an

herbicide."
Mike Garfield, the issues coordi-
nator at the Ecology Center of Ann
Arbor, said 2,4-D is a suspected car-
cinogen and mutagen. "A substantial
body of evidence says that it is ex-
tremely hazardous, although a num-
ber of industry sources say other-
wise," Garfield said.
The most recent study on the ef-
fects of 2,4-D come from the Na-
tional Cancer Institute and the Uni-
versity of Kansas. In the study,

farmers who worked with the herbi-
cide were six times more likely than
the average person to develop non-
Hodgkins lymphoma, a cancer of the
lymph nodes.
The Environmental Protection
Agency is reconsidering its stance on
the herbicide, Garfield said.
According to Garfield, 2,4-D is
also a suspected cause of birth de-
fects. Some chronic effects that re-
sult from low levels of exposure can

include numbness, chronic
respiratory impairment, bleeding
tendency and concentration and
memory problems, he said. Young
people's body size makes them more
susceptible to the herbicide's effects,
said Garfield.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

I I

JOSTENS
GOLD RING SALE
IS COMING!

S60
$4Q
'20

OFF
OFF
OFF

18K
14K

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Getting their kicks
Unidentified members of the Burns Park Soccer Team hold practice at Ann Arbor's Burns Park. They are
preparing for a series of Saturday matches.
UAW calls store unfair;
Herman's refutes charge
(ContinuedfromPage3)1 man's couldn't pay beginning em-
store is 38 cents lower than the ployees $5 and remain competitive
average wage at stores which employ with other sporting goods stores,2
mostly whites. such as MC and Dunham's which
Hawk said that during negotia- pay starting employees $3.50 per
tions management officials complied hour.H
lists of employees and rates of pay Hawks also said Herman's man-
and found "no trend where Blacks agement offered the union an
were paid less than whites." alternative health package to the one
She also said that during negotia- it demanded, but "they weren't inter- Copies, Binding, Passport photos.
tions the union rejected the stores ested at all."540 1. Uberty 1220S.University
proposed 30 cent per hour raise and She said Herman's management 761-439 747-9070
instead demanded a $5.00 per hour asked the UAW three times to give
starting wage. store manegers information on a tu-
Hawk said the demand was ition reimbursement program, but
"totally ridiculous." She said Her- that the union failed to do so.

Al

A M E R I C A' S

SL EN
C 0 L L E G E R i N G'

Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
Monday, September 21- Friday, September 25,
. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
to select from a complete line of gold rings.
A $20.00 deposit is required when ordering.

53YEARS '
MORE THAN A BOOKSTORE

549 East University
Ann Arbor, MI (313)662-3201
(at the corner of East U. and South U.)

GROUP THERAPY FOR
INCEST SURVIVORS
Therapy group is forming for incest
survivors who experience continued
problems in living.
Group will meet 1 1/2 hours weekly,
September 1987 to August 1988.
$7.50 per session.
Call the Counseling Center for
information, 764-9466.

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