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April 13, 1987 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-13

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, April 13, 1987 - Poge3

Jazz for Life
sponsors drive
for poor kids

By LAURA STERN
This week is a busy one for Jazz
For Life, a non-profit organization
dedicated to aiding poor children.
The group is sponsoring several
activities this week to increase
community awareness of the
problem and to raise funds.
Shakey Jake Woods and the Jazz
for Life Crusaders held a benefit
concert at Rick's American Cafe
last night, and Jazz for Life will
sponsor a bucket drive on the Diag
today and tomorrow.
The bucket drive will feature the
group Mosaic Art, playing from
noon to 1:00 p.m. The band Bop
Secret will be performing tomorrow
at the same time.
Other activities include a raffle, a
bake sale, and meal sacrifices in
dorms, fraternities, and sororities.
The meal sacrifice, promoted in all
residence halls last week, raised
more than $6200 for poor children
in Washtenaw County. 87 percent
of the residents of Mosher-Jordan
signed up for meal sacrifices, entit-

ling all residents to free admission
to last night's benefit.
Jazz for Life stresses community
involvement in helping poor
children. There are more than 5,000
of these children under the age of
six in Washtenaw County. Nation-
wide, one of every four children
comes from a family with an
income below the federally recog-
nized poverty level.
Jazz for Life also tries to benefit
Ann Arbor area children not only
with funds, but also through expo-
sure to the arts and cultural
programs.
In the past, Jazz For Life has
sponsored benefit concerts with
Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, and
Stan Getz. Local children targeted
for this program enjoyed these
concerts for free and benefited from
their proceeds.
The money raised from those
concerts was donated to the Student
Parent's Center, Perry Nursery
School, and the Headstart Program
of Ypsilanti.

Doily Photo by GRACE TSAI
-Anthony Henderson, political science graduate student and UCAR mem-
ber, speaks about racism to a group of 60 students at a UCAR-sponsored
teach-in in the Anderson room of the Union Saturday.
UCAJI sponSOrS
raim teah-.in

Associated Press
Car bomb blast
Rescue workers evacuate an injured boy on a stretcher after the ex-
plosion of a car bomb in the Sadd el-Boushrieh district of Christian East
Beirut on Palm Sunday.
Ed. speech program

By EUGENE PAK
and FAITH PENNICK
The United Coalition Against
Racism held a teach-in all day
Saturday to discuss racism and
strategies to combat it.
The teach-in featured a variety
of speakers including University
students, professors, student lea-
ders from other 'campuses, and
community members active in
minority affairs.
More than 60 people were
present at any one time, partici-
pating in dialogues on subjects
including the different faces of
racism, the history of anti-racist
struggle at the University, and
politics and strategies for building
national student movement.
Anthony Henderson, a UCAR
member and political science
graduate student, spoke on "The
Personal Politics of White
Racism and How to Combat It."
Henderson explained the dif-
ference between racism and
prejudice.
He said both minorities and
whites can be prejudiced, but
racism is an instrument of power
to oppress groups of other races,
and because minorities do not

have the economic and political
power to be oppressors, they
cannot be "racist."
Sociology graduate student-
Hector Delgado spoke on "Racism
and Reagan." Delgado said that an
increasing tolerance for racism and
a growing number of racist
incidents are attributable to the
actions and policies of the Reagan
administration.
Later in the teach-in, Black
student leaders from other univer-
sities spoke about their
experiences in organizing students
for anti-racist actions.
Pam Bozeman, president of the
Black Student Organization at
Northern IllinoisUniversity,said
it was difficult to get apathetic
students there involved in the
struggle, and groups such as the
Black fraternities and sororities
were more concerned with ful-
filling their own personal agenda.
Henderson suggested that in
order to involve groups with
specific interests, a coalition must
"co-opt" some of the smaller
groups' interests within its own
agenda.
"You have to speak the lan-
guage they are speaking," said
Henderson.

Texaco seeks protection

NEW YORK (AP) - Oil giant
Texaco Inc., fighting an $11 billion
judgment in favor of Pennzoil Co.,
filed yesterday for protection from
creditors under federal bankruptcy
laws. It is the biggest U.S. indus -
trial company to take the drastic
step.
The filing does not mean Texaco
is insolvent and should have little
or not effect on its day-to-day oper -

ations. But it means Pennzoil will
be unable to seize any Texaco as -
sets indefinitely.
Analysts interpreted the move by
Texaco as a tactical measure to stall
Pennzoil and pressure the rival into
a settlement of their two-year-old
court battle, in which Pennzoil ac -
cused Texaco of illegally interfering
in a planned merger between Penn -
zoil and Getty Oil Co.

mabe e
(Ctinued from Page 1)
from the college level down to
nursery school.
"The funds are extremely low,"
Berger said. "The committee will
have to decide if the program has a
central mission."
He said that if the committee
decides to continue the program
funds will be taken from other
departments.
"We are central to education,"
said first-year graduate student.Teri-
Anne Russini. "These people have

fimina ted
learning difficulties, and we help
them with their problem.
"What gets me is that I'm an out
of state student. So are others," said
first-year graduate student Teri-Anne
Russini. "We turned down scholar-
ships to come here, and we're
paying mega-tuition for a program
that's dying out. Berger says the
school is focusing its program. Of
course we know underlying all of
this are financial matters. That's
not what's coming out, but that's
the bottom line."

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EDUCATIONAL CENTER LTD.

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ITHELS
; What's happening in Ann Arbor today
fomneicuigwrsb

Campus Cinema

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48 Hours (Walter Hill, 1982),
MTF, DBL/7:00 p.m., Mich.
Great "odd couple" flick about a
tough, cynical detective (Nick
Nolte) who must work with a
smart-ass con (Eddie Murphy) in
order to track down a very
psychotic killer. The movie strikes
an amazingly adept balance betwen
it's comedy, which is utterly
hilarious, and it's action, which is
tense and gritty.
Trading Places (John Landis,
1983), MTF, DBL/9:00 p.m.,
Mich.
Very funny, well-paced comedy
about a snobbish executive (Dan
*Akroyd) who gets usurped by a
street-smart con (Eddie Murphy) in
_ order to test the "Pymalion" theory
of his amoral bosses. When the
men find they are being played for
pawns, however, they plot an
elaborate revenge.
Experimental Film Series,
A2 Film Fest, 7:00 p.m.,
Performance Network.

formance including works by
Tchaikovsky and Schumann.
Speakers
Alfonso Archi - "New
Information on the Ebla State,"
Department of Near Eastern
Studies, 4 p.m., Rm. 3050 Frieze
Bldg.
David Hoffman - Department
of Chemistry, 4 p.m., Rm. 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
Frank Bates - "Order. and
Disorder in Block Co-Pollymer
Melts," Macromolecular Research
Center, 4 p.m., Rm. 1017, Dow
Bldg.
Meetings
Christian Fellowship
Organization Meeting- 7:15
p.m., Michigan League.
Furthermore
S A F E W A L K - Night time
Safety Walking Service, 8 p.m.-
1:30 a.m, Room 102, UGLi (936-
1000).

Why"
WOULD YOU PAY FOR
NON-M EMORY TYPING?°
LOW PRICES ON:
* ACADEMIC PAPERS
(handwritten)
" Resumes
* Theses, Dissertations
" Letters and Application Forms
PRINTING CENTERS, .c
330 S. STATE ST., ANN ARBOR. Mf 48109
769-COPY 761-TYPE
CONVENIENT LOCATION: MICHIGAN UNION
(High-speed Copy Services Available)

BUSINESS
CEDAR POINT
AMUSEMENT PARK,
Sandusky, Ohio, will hold
Interviews for summer employment.
.J P E N INrT ER V .I E AS
rLDNCLSDAY APRIL 15, 1967
HUL I IOA Y INN
JS4 3 AT EXI T 37b
ANN ARBOR MI
9 AM TJ 9 PM
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Word Processing Light Industrial Technical Design
Secretarial Electronic Assembly Programming
Medical Transcribing Landscaping Computer Operation
Data Entry Printing Engineering
Accounting Warehousing Designing
Reception Maintenance Detailing.
General Office Drivers Drafting
More Lots More Even More
THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTION TESTS YOUR
EMPLOYABILITY AND SENSE OF HUMOR.
INSTRUCTION: Bring in this coupon to register.
Arbor Temporanes
Ann Arbor (313) 761-5252
315 E. Eisenhower Pkwy., Suite 2
.-.....--............- .............

Open projector night for local
filmmakers. For more info, drop a
dime at 663-0681.
The Prints And The Paper:
Our Airlines, Eye, 8:00 p.m.,
214 N. 4th.
8MM filmmakers Jeff Plansker,
Tom Ludwig, & Owen O'Toole
will be on hand.
Performances
Stacy Phelps-Wetzel Violin
Recital - School of Music, 8

Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48109. Include all pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an-
nouncements for FrI4ay and
Sunday events at least two weeks

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