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April 10, 1987 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-10

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In Weekend Magazine:

Using animals for research " The List " Logie
0 Police Academy 4 " Interview: Frank Canciola

Ninety-seven years of editorialfreedom

VOLUME XCVII - NO. 131

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN - FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1987

COPYRIGHT 1987, THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Officials
consider
racism
courses
By MARTIN FRANK
University officialsare currently
reviewing proposals for courses on
cultural diversity and racial
awareness as a part of a $1 million
program to improve undergraduate
life at the University.
The initiative was established by
University Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost
James Duderstadt in January.
Each course proposal, which was
submitted last week, is being
studied by two or three reviewers -
students, faculty, and staff members
- familiar with the subject of the
proposal.
THE PROPOSALS will be
reviewed by the Grants Review
Board which will make its recom-
mendations to Duderstadt, who will
then make the final decision.
One proposal, sent in by the
Women's Studies program, in-
evolves training upperclass under-
graduates to teach a mini-course on
racism and sexism.
According to Margaret Lourie,
associate director of Women's
Studies, the course would last for
one or two weekends.
The course will hold between six
and eight students, who will receive
one credit for their work. Lourie
thinks that the "marathon session"
will help students learn more about
the issues.
Lourie said some sort of course
of cultural diversity and racial
awareness should be required for
See ORIENTATION, PAGE 3

Wallace

to

speak at
gradunation

By STEPHEN GREGORY
and ROSE MARY WUMMEL
University alumnus and CBS
correspondent Mike Wallace told
the Daily yesterday he will speak at
the University's May 2 commence-
ment ceremony.
Communication Prof. Charles
Eisendrath said he nominated
Wallace to speak at commencement
because of Wallace's achievements.
"He's not simply a journalist; he's
a pioneering journalist," Eisendrath
said.
WALLACE said last night that
he was honored to receive the invi-
tation. Wallace graduated in 1939
with a Bachelor of Arts degree.
"I love the school... It's going
home," he said.
Eisendrath said Wallace was
integral in the formation of the
CBS investigative news program
60 Minutes. "He has combined
investigative reporting with the
dominant medium of the century,"
Eisendrath said.
According to Eisendrath, Wallace
has spoken at the University
previously and has presided over
various events for the Department
of Economics.
Wallace worked for CBS since
1963, when he began as a

correspondant and anchor for CBS
Morning News. In 1968 he began
his ongoing work as a reporter for
the popular 60 Minutes program.
WHILE AT the Univer-
sity,Wallace worked as an
announcer at the University radio
division, was a member of now
defunct Kappa Nu fraternity, ran
track, and was involved in
University play production.
Wallace was born in 1918, in
Brookshire, Mass. to Russian-
Jewish immigrants.
Wallace's broadcasting career
began in Grand Rapids, Mich. and
then at Detroit's WXYZ. In 1941,
he began working at a Chicago
radio station as a newscaster, but
his career was interrupted in 1943
by service in the United States
Navy.
In 1946, Wallace returned to
Chicago to work on a variety of"
interview, news, and entertainment
programs. 1n1949, he teamed up
with his actress-wife, Buff Cobb, in
a local radio interview program. In
1951, the pair were put under
contract by CBS and began a
television series called Mike and
Buff. The show was a first in its
See WALLACE, Page 2

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Racism will not be tolerated, says UCAR spokesman Roderick Linzie, at a rally on Palmer Field yesterday.
Linzie gestures towards Couzens Hall, scene of two racist incidents this year.
UCAR protests dorm racism

By WENDY LEWIS
Saying it would be "dangerous
for'us to start to- relax,"members of
the United Coalition Against
Racism rallied in Palmer Field last
night to protest racism in
University residence halls.
Coalition members said the field
-located behind the hill residence

halls - is a strategic location.
Racial flyers have been distributed
to Black students in Mosher Jordan,
Couzens, and Stockwell.
"These dorms are the very seats
and bastions of racism," said
Roderick Linzie, a UCAR spokes-
person and sociology graduate
student.

A flyer advertising the rally, but
with "nigger" written on it, was
slipped under the door of a Black'
woman in Stockwell yesterday,
according to UCAR spokesman
Roderick Linzie. Last week, LSA
junior John Simms received two
racist flyers in poem form at his
See RALLY, Page 3

Campus Politics

I College Republicans
ride conservative wave

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
The University has always been
considered a stronghold of liberal -
ism, a reputation acquired from the
student demonstrations in the 60s
and 70s. But "the days of liberal
dominance on campuses are over,"
according to Debbie Buchholtz,
former president of the University's
College Republicans.
Current president Dave Staels
added, "The campus at Michigan is
more liberal in that the quiet
conservatives are here to get an
education and get out. The liberals
want to 'change the world."'
"We offer an alternative to what
we think is a far-left bias on
campus... But the College
Republicans are a diverse group,"
said Stael, an LSA junior.
Stael said, for example, that
group members support a range of
presidential candidates, from
"extreme" conservative Represen -
tative Jack Kemp (R-New York), to
"moderate" U.S. Vice President
George Bush, and even Democrat
Senator Sam Nunn (D-Georgia).
Members of the College Repub -
licans work in individual groups for
candidates, and help to act as
liasons between state Republicans
and the University community.
"Michigan is a swing state,"
Staels said. The group therefore is
seeking to create more awareness

go," she added. Currently about 400
students belong to the group.
Nationally, the College Repub -
licans have about 100,000 members
on 1,200 campuses across the
country. The group emphasizes
their relatively large size compared
to the 150 College Democrats clubs
nationwide.
"The College Democrats on
campus here seem much more
'The campus at Michigan
is more liberal in that the
quiet conservatives are
here to get an education,
and get out.'
-College Republican
president Dave Staels
liberal, and less moderate, then in
the years past," said Staels. "This
may be due to the number of
students involved in Dean Baker's
campaign." Baker is a graduate
student who unsuccessfully tried to
unseat U.S. Rep. Carl Pursell (R-
Plymouth) last fall.
Many college students, however,
are not committed conservatives or
liberals.
"I vote for an individual
candidate and not their party because

Student
opinions
differ on
65 mph
By HEATHER ROSE
While lawmakers were over-
whelmingly in favor of raising the
speed limit on rural interstate
highways from 55 to 65 mph,
students seem undecided about the
value of the law.
Last month, both houses of
Congress approved the highway
bill, which also earmarks $87.5
billion for transportation projects,
then overrode a veto of the bill by
President Ronald Reagan.
In an effort to save energy, the
speed limit was changed in 1974
from 70 mph to 55. Supporters of
theincreased speed limit say the
change is needed to keep up with
the driving habits of Americans.
Trucks today are equipped to handle
See STUDENT, Page 5

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
College Democrats President Jesse Levine and Vice-President Suzanne Saunders listeh attentively as Bill
Weinzel, an aide to U.S. Senator Donald Riegle (D-Mich.), addresses the group yesterday, in the Anderson
Room of the Union.
College Pemfs. seek support

INSIDE
The Supreme Court's affirmative
action decision was a step in the
right direction.
OPINION, PAGE 4
Another six Art School grad -
uates get to show off their stuff
at Slusser Gallery this week.
ARTS, PAGE 7

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
In the face of a national wave of conservatism,
stand the College Democrats. "Liberalism still
exists," says the University's College Democrats
President Jesse Levine, an LSA sophomore. "And I
don't think it's on its way out."
John Bhushan, former College Democrats'

"Its a way for undergraduates who have an interest
in affiliating with the Democrat party to meet with
others who share their interests," says College
Democrats Vice President Suzanne Saunders, an LSA
sophomore.
The College Democrats are affiliated with the
Democratic party at local, state, and national levels.

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