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March 30, 1987 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
1 9 8 7 C O L L E G E

A C H I E V E M E N T

A W A R D S

Boxing Federation as a top Olympic can-
didate, Anton is now going for it all. He
is training for the 1988 Olympics.
DAPHNE DASCOM
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW
YORK AT BUFFALO
She would like to be the first practicing
physician in space. It is an ambition that
combines Daphne Bascom's two major
fields of interest-space and medicine.
But Bascom, a 4.0 average biology major,
is also a realist; she knows a trip in space
is a long way off. What will she do in the
meantime?
In the laboratory, Bascom has been
studying the way organisms adapt to en-
vironmental stresses; she is delving into
this knowledge to discover possible ap-
plications that will advance manned
space exploration. She also envisions
many applications of such research on
earth. Bascom points out how experi-
ments in microgravity, for example, are
leading to new techniques in cardio-
pulmonary rehabilitation and new ways
to recover from long-term bed rest.
Bascom's next step? Medical school.
And how does NASA fit into her busy
schedule? She's already completed the
Kennedy Space Center's Life Sciences
Training Program there. She's getting
ready to launch herself and her medical
know-how into space.
ADAM DURKE

COLORADO COLLEGE

and self-worth. Various addictions, and
ultimately suicide, reveal a sense of
futility that allows people to desecrate
one of their most valuable possessions:
their own bodies."
Burke is also president of BACCHUS,
a student organization that promotes the
responsible use of alcohol. Committed to
helping others through community ser-
vice, Burke states, "I refuse to remain
idle while those around me destroy
themselves because of ignorance or
desolation."
KRISTIN CADRA
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Kristin Cabral freely admits that there
are many things she wants to do, and
that she's not at all sure which will come
first. A political science major, Cabral
cites academia, public sector law, and
political journalism as three possible
career paths, and she seems determined
to have them all.
Cabral is the 1987 editor-in-chief of
The Michigan Journal of Political Science, a
polished, scholarly periodical that claims

the distinction of being the only
academic political science publication in
the United States put out by undergradu-
ates. Having worked her way up from
editorial assistant, Cabral has learned
the ropes-everything from editing and
rewriting to computer typesetting and
printing. She's managed, nevertheless,
to find time to contribute to The
Michigan Daily's opinion page, serve as
administrative director of the graduate
school student government, and partici-
pate on the Michigan Student Assem-
bly's student rights committee.
The values important in Cabral's
world: public discourse, free speech,
involvement.
ELIlADIV OEGDA/IA_
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
At 23, Elizabeth deGrazia is a bit older
than the average college junior. But how
many other 3.9 average public policy
majors have put in two years as a profes-
sional dancer with New York's Joffrey
Ballet, followed by a year's stint as budget
analyst for the New York City Mayor's
Office?
Financially on her own since the age
of 17, deGrazia gave up a successful
dance career for a very simple reason: she
wanted to go to college. "No matter how
good I might have been," deGrazia
reminisces, "I didn't want to wake up
when I was 35, have just a high school
education, and have to teach dance the
rest of my life. I wanted an education."
A year working in New York City's
Office of Management and Budget
helped to crystallize deGrazia's interest
in government. Her recent naming as
the 1986 Truman Scholar from New York
has only reinforced her commitment to
education.
Does she ever regret giving up a career
in the arts for one in public policy? Not
for a minute.
JIONAIHAN FENG
HARVARD COLLEGE
The parallels between music and physics
have long been noted-many musicians

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Adam Burke's personal and scholarly in-
terest is also a very timely topic: teenage
suicide. A political science major, Burke
recently completed a research project
and paper that's been recognized by Dr.
Mary Giffin, one of the nation's leading
teen suicidologists. Giffin praised Burke's
paper for its thoroughness and accuracy,
and she is using it as a primer for the
parents of her adolescent patients.
Burke sees suicide-and the accom-
panying problems of alcohol and drug
abuse-as symptoms of greater societal
problems. "We are rapidly becoming a
nation of individuals devoid of self-value

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