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March 30, 1987 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPECIAL ADVFIRTISIN( SFCTION
1 9 8 7 C O L L E G E

A C H I E V E M E N T

A W A R t) S

1
ur Leaders
Heeaeof the Future
Here are 100 of the most outstanding college
juniors in the nation. They excel in academics
and stand out as best in their chosen paths of

M pursuit. They

are the winners of the second

annual TIME College Achievement Awards.

TIME conducted a rigorous nationwide search
to find them. A panel of judges from the busi-
ness, academic and public sectors chose the
winners. TIME awarded $2500 to each of the
top 20 winners and $250 to each of the 80
finalists.
They're enterprising, scholarly, enthusiastic
and determined to succeed. But more impor-
p tantly, they're looking beyond their own selves
to the world at large. They're our young leaders
of tomorrow, and they're already making a
difference.

KAMAL AHMAD
HARVARD COLLEGE
Kamal Ahmad came to Harvard from his
native Bangladesh, via Phillips Exeter
Academy. Early on, at the age of 16,
Ahmad demonstrated leadership. He
was just a high school junior when he
showed his concern for the poor, unedu-
cated children in his neighborhood. He
saw they were not able to read or write, so
he did something about it. He started the
Bangladesh Juvenile Association, and
now those children are learning to read
in formal classroom settings. A promi-
nent newspaper in Bangladesh called
Ahmad's efforts, "a literacy milestone of
private initiative in a very constructive
national direction."
While hes not on Harvard turf, grants
from Harvard and the Ford Foundation
enable Ahmad to travel and study in the
developing world.
It is Ahmads hope "that as Americans
become more involved, they will learn
not only about the Third World, they
will learn more about themselves."
WILLAM ANTON
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
Bill Anton is both an exceptional
scholar and athlete. He's a straight-A
student at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson
School of Public and International
Affairs; he's also a highly ranked amateur
boxer. In 1986, Anton was named New
Jersey's Truman Scholar as well as the
state's Open Class Heavyweight Boxing
Champion.
Raised in a comfortable suburb of New
York, Anton trained in gyms in econom-
ically depressed areas. He sought this
experience, because he wanted to under-
stand people who were different from
himself. "I've had the privilege of meet-
ing and learning from people of all ages,
classes, and races," says Anton.
"However, I've also seen many of our
nation's problems first-hand-problems
that I want to help solve." How will he
do this? Most likely, hopes Anton,
through public service, possibly as a
legislator.
Right now, Anton's concerns are more
immediate. Chosen by the International

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