100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 30, 1987 -Page 3

Health internships
offered to minorities

By EVE BECKER
Dr. Richard Lichtenstein, an
assistant professor in the University
School of Public Health, last year
saw a need to attract undergraduate
minority students to public health
fields.
So he developed a summer inter-
nship program to get minority stud-
ents interested in the health fields.
That program is now in its second
year.
The internship program arranges
paid ten-week positions with local
hospitals, health maintenance org-
anizations (HMOs), and health fin-
ancing agencies.
"Its purpose is to inform under-
graduate minority students about
the whole field," Lichtenstein said.
"It's an exciting area, there are jobs
available. We want to tell minority
students that they could work in the
health field if they don't have the
interest in or aptitude for clinical
fields."
LICHTENSTEIN said that in
Detroit, which is 63 percent Black,
only four out of 22 hospital chief
executive officers are Black. "It's a
real deficit, especially in top
levels," he said.
The School of Public Health has
10.8 percent minority student enrol-
lment.
So far 42 students, including

students from other universities,
have applied for the internship.
There are 18 spots available.
Although the application deadline is
April 1, Lichtenstein will be taking
applications through the beginning
of next week.
Lichtenstein said the program is
developed to provide students with
"real world problems and projects to
complete." The participating
organizations develop a job, arrange
for a supervisor, and commit to pay
the intern approximately $200 per
week.
TO SUPPLEMENT the in-
terns' experience, Lichtenstein
holds weekly seminars for the
students in which he discusses the
health field and health care systems,
occasionally bringing in guest
speakers.
Lichtenstein attributes much of
the program's success to the stud-
ents ability to conduct and complete
their own projects and their
exposure to top administrators.
LSA senior Traci Colvin worked
in Comprehensive Health Services,
a small HMO organization in
Detroit. She was placed in the
research department and worked
with a senior research analyst,
reporting the benefits that the HMO
provides.
Colvin, a communication major,
has changed her career goals after

her exposure to the health field. She
has applied to the School of Public
Health for the fall as a result of her
summer experience.
She was particularly pleased
with the level of work she was able
to do within the organization. "In a
lot of summer jobs you don't get a
chance to see the inside, we got to
see (the health field) from an
administrative view."
LSA junior Billy Mann worked
in the Henry Ford Hospital in
Detroit, examining its patient
escort system to see how it could
work more effectively. He orig-
inally was interested strictly in the
medical sciences, but said he also
became interested in hospital
administration.
"The administrators were great.
One took me under his wing and
taught me a lot of things you can't
learn in a textbook. I was strictly
oriented to the medical sciences be-
fore," he said. "I thought admin-
istrators were always the bad guys,
but they were as concerned as the
doctors were."
Considering Abortion?
Free Pregnancy Test
Completely Confidential
Pregnancy Counseling Center
529 N. Hewitt, Ypsilanti
Ca: 434-3088 (Any Time)

Daily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Step on it!
Ann Arbor residents Angela and Melissa Satori, in search of a lawn, test out a John Deere lawnmower tractor
at the Home Improvements Show Sunday in the Track and Tennis building. Fortunately, they won't be hitting
the road for another 12 years.

BAM III di
(Continued from Page 1)
who participated lost their jobs.
In the second and then in the
most recent strike the police were
called as students staged sit-ins at
the Fleming building, but no
arrests were made.
In each strike, the students
presented the administration with a
set of demands focused on increas-

raws on protest legacy

ing Black student enrollment on
campus, providing tuition waivers
for underrepresented minority stud-
ents, establishing a University-wide
Financial Aid Appeals Board, and
granting tenure to all Black faculty
members.
A 1970 proposal to replace
"Negro" with "Black" in University

publications is updated in a current
proposal to capitalize "Black".
Each strike ended in settlement
with the University administration
and the Board of Regents.

BUSINESS

'U' scholars recognized

U U

(Continued from Page1)
have motivated you to excel so far,"
said Wright, who urged students to
keep an open mind while pursuing
knowledge.
Wright received a master's degree
in journalism from the University
in 1971 and has since served as a

foreign correspondent for the
Christian Science Monitor and the
Washington Post. She recounted
her experiences in countries where
access to information was severely
restricted and where citizens were
executed for having forbidden
books.

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

WE WORK AS
LATE AS YOU DO
kinko's
Whenever you need clear, quality copies, come to
Kinkos. We're open early, open late, and open
weekends.
When you're working late, it's good to know you're not
working alone,
Great copies. Great people.

FIRST SESSION
(6 weeks beginning May 18)
Registration by mail or in person:
MAY 11, 9:00-12:00
2:00 - 6:00

SECOND SESSION
(6 weeks beginning June 29)
Registration by mail or in person:
JUNE 16,.10:00-1:00
3:00-6:00

Day or evening classes " Wide array of courses in Business, Arts and
Sciences, Education, Nursing " All summer courses applicable to regular
Loyola University degrees " Classes at the Lake Shore, Water Tower, and
Medical Center Campuses. Special this summer: Art and Archaeology
in Mexico.

Campus Cinema
A City At Chandigarh (A.
Tanner, 1966), Eye, 8:00 p.m., 214
N. 4th.
Le Corbusier's construction of a city
from the dust of the Punjab is captured
on film.
She's Gotta Have It (Spike Lee,
1986), MTF, 7:45 p.m., Mich.
This highly-acclaimed low-budget
flick concerns a free-spirited urban
woman and thc three suitors she keeps
on a string, each of whom is interested
in a more monogamous arrangement.
A street-smart romantic comedy that's
been compared favorably to Woody
Allen.
Speakers
Debbie Mariano - "Chiral Metal
Nucleotide Complexes as Probes for
Enzyme Active Sites," Department of
Chemistry, 4 p.m., Room 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
Stuart Altman - "Impact of a
Changing Mcedical Payment System
on Technological Innovation and
Utilization," Department of Healh
Services Management and Policy, 4
p.m., Auditorium II, Thomas Francis
Building.
Sonia Garcia - "The Role of
Women in the Nicaraguan
Revolution," Committee for Soial
Progress in Rio San Juan/The Ann

Arbor Sister City Task Force, 4 p.m.,
Kuenzel Room, Union.
Meetings
Asian American Association
Meeting - 7 p.m., Trotter House,
1443 Washtenaw.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting -' 7:15 p.m., Michgan
Leaugue.
Ann Arbor Coalition for
Women's Rights Meeting -
7:30 p.m., Conference Room B, 3rd
floor, League.
Furthermore
SAFEWALK - Night time Safety
Walking Service, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
Room 102, UGLi (936-1000).
Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48108. Include 011 pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an-.
nouncements for Friday and
Sunday events at least two weeks
before the event, and announ-
cements for weekday events
must be received at least two
days before the event.

All in-person registrations in the Georgetown Room of the
Marquette Center, 820 North Rush Street, Chicago
Telephone 312/670-3011 or complete the coupon below to receive
a copy of the 1987 Bulletin of The Summer Sessions. The Bulletin
includes complete course listings as well as information on how to regis-
ter by mail or in person.
LOYOLA. REAL VALUES FOR YOUR MONEY.
' F The Summer Sessions
' ) LOYOLA UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO '
820 North Michigan Avenue - Chicago, Illinois 60611
NAMFPHONE
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
We are an equal opportnity educator employerIL
L - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -"-

OPEN 24 HOURS
540 E. Liberty
Across From Mich. Theater
761-4539

OPEN EARLY OPEN LATE
1220 S. University
Across From Village Corners
747-9070

I

REGISTRAR'S BULLETIN BOARD
IT'S TIME!
EARLY REGISTRATION FOR SPRING; SUMMER; SPRING-SUMMER;
AND FALL TERMS IS HERE!

REGISTRATION SCHEDULE

CORRECTIONS
It is The Daily's policy to acknowledge factual errors in this space. Readers
who spot errors are encouraged to contact the editors at 764-0552.

April 1-3
April 6-12

9:00 -
12:30 -

11:45 a.m.
4:15 p.m.

REGISTRATION FOR NURSING STUDENTS
AND GRADUATE / PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS
(EXCEPT BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION)

Registration by appointment begins April 6 and ends April 21 (except for weekends). Hours 8:00 a.m.
- 4:15 p.m. The exact appointment time and registration location will be printed on the Student Veri-
fication Form. Students will register according to the following priority group sequence.
Seniors 85 credits or more
Juniors 55 - 84 credits
Dos - Kom
Kon - Roa
CAw TO AWRob - Zzz
ICA TIONF Aaa - Dor

VETERINARY MEDICINE:
AN OPTION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS

LO

SCIENCE

* MEDICINE * ANIMALS

6v .1tERv4,

LA %q %,,

.0

V ERINq44

North Campus:
Central Campus:

153 CHRYSLER CENTER for all students enrolled in Arch. & U.P.; Art; Engineering;
Music; (including Rackham students enrolled in these units)
Room 17 Angell Hall for everybody else

Lad *4ph"

REMEMBER, YOU MUST HAVE THESE MATERIALS IN ORDER TO REGISTER:
Student Verification Form - this form will indicate the time and place to register
Student ID card

A veterinarian can combine these interests to tailor a career selected from
a wide range of opportunities that include biomedical research, private

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan